Question About Sturdiness Of A Box Mix Cake

Decorating By robinscakes Updated 22 Jul 2009 , 9:36pm by indydebi

robinscakes Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 12:18pm
post #1 of 17

I have a customer who specifically requested a box mix cherry chip cake for her 3-tier cake I need to do for her wedding this weekend. Ok, fine. I don't normally use this mix, but whatever she wants. My question is will a Pillsbury cherry chip cake be strong enough for a 3 tier cake (10", 8", 6")? Those Pillsbury box mixes are much lighter than the cake I make. I will use the same commercial support system I usually use and have been happy with. I'm just wondering if I should add something to the cake mix to make it a little sturdier. Any help would be appreciated.

16 replies
beachcakes Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 12:37pm
post #2 of 17

I've never used cherry chip, but check out the WASC recipe in the recipe section. It makes a nice, sturdy cake. Just wondering - wouldn't the commercial support system work on any cake since the supports hold up the cake, the cake doesn't hold up the cake?

mindy1204 Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 1:04pm
post #3 of 17

I just made a French Vanilla box cake per request. I added an extra egg based on something I read on here and it did seem to make it a little sturdier.

indydebi Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 1:49pm
post #4 of 17

You can make tiered cake out of cool whip and if the support system is a good one, the cake on top will hold up fine.

It's not the sturdiness or the texture of the cake ... it's the reliability of your support system.

I've used cake mixes for 30 years for all of my wedding cakes. I only started adding an extra egg a couple of years ago.

sadsmile Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 2:44pm
post #5 of 17

the cherry chip cake is a delicate one though. I would add a touch( 1 TBSP) more oil to make it more dense and bake at 320° until it is done, let it cool before handeling it or leveling it, let it settle or help it along by squishing it a bit and then let the layers get nice and firm in the freezer for a couple minutes before stacking it up.

I use boxed mixes all the time and don't have any issues with being too soft. I do mix it in my certian way... Mixing affects the gluten which affects how the cake bakes and hold together. The less you mix the lighter the more crumbly and if you mix too much well it won't rise and is heavy and flat. I mix all the wet ingredients together includiing the eggs then add in the box mix. I mix it till all the dry is mixed in and there are still little balls of dry cake mix like little dregees in the batter and then I turn off the mixer and prepair my pans by greesing with crisco on a plastic(to keep my fingers clean) baggie and lightly flouring and pounding out the exces flour over the sink.(mostly told you that for a time reference) Then I go back and turn the mixer back on for almost one minute. During this mixing time all the little balls of pwder smooth out most of the way and the batter thickens up quite a bit. Then I pour it into my pans and let it rest for another minute and then into the oven it goes. I do this religously and I never have an issue with soft textured cake from a box. They always turn out great.

Debi I love your comebacks..LOL But you are so right a tower of whip cream could stand up with the right supports.
And as for the extra egg... Lots of people do that and it comes out great. I don't like to add an extra egg into a white based cake because I think there isn't a strong enough flavor profile in the cake to cover the egg flavor from adding an extra egg- That is just my personal preference so I don't do it.

robinscakes Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 2:51pm
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

You can make tiered cake out of cool whip and if the support system is a good one, the cake on top will hold up fine.

It's not the sturdiness or the texture of the cake ... it's the reliability of your support system.

I've used cake mixes for 30 years for all of my wedding cakes. I only started adding an extra egg a couple of years ago.




I understand the support system is what holds the cake together, but if the cake itself can't support three layers of itself, it can sink and leave gaps between the separator plates. I don't want that to happen. I'm not worried about the support system not being strong enough. I'm just worried that three layers, or even two layers, of box cake mix will eventually settle and leave gaps. Maybe I should just flat ice them and let them sit for a while before doweling and tiering them. I never do that with my cakes because the size of the cake out of the oven is pretty much the size it stays. Has anyone ever had this happen?

zuzucakes Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 3:11pm
post #7 of 17

I mix my cake mixes with pound cake. I have used it for the cherry chip , nothing but complements. Using the pound cake makes it a little sturdier.

I just throw both in mixer and use directions on the box . Hope this helps

zuzucakes Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 3:13pm
post #8 of 17

I mix my cake mixes with pound cake. I have used it for the cherry chip , nothing but complements. Using the pound cake makes it a little sturdier.

I just throw both in mixer and use directions on the box . Hope this helps

zuzucakes Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 3:15pm
post #9 of 17

I mix my cake mixes with pound cake. I have used it for the cherry chip , nothing but complements. Using the pound cake makes it a little sturdier.

I just throw both in mixer and use directions on the box . Hope this helps

sadsmile Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 4:06pm
post #10 of 17

The pound cake is an excellent idea to firm this mix up(and I like it much better then an extra egg) except that this spesific flavor was requested and is expected. Any real change in the flavor they remember may make them unsatisfied -or it could make it better then they remember and they may love it even more. Some people can't tell when things are doctored and some can so it just depends. I would talk it over with the clients... if they do or don't like pound cake ect. Let them make the desicion.

zuzucakes Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 4:42pm
post #11 of 17

sorry it posted 3 times...

zuzucakes Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 4:44pm
post #12 of 17

sorry it posted 3 times...

zuzucakes Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 4:46pm
post #13 of 17

sorry it posted 3 times...

sadsmile Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 5:24pm
post #14 of 17

ROFLMBO!!!! icon_lol.gif It is pretty funny and ironic that you wanted to post sorry for posting 3xs and it got posted 3xs...LOL Oh thats great! hehehe

Loucinda Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 7:46pm
post #15 of 17

What I do may help you - I bake on Wednesday, cool, then wrap the cake in saran wrap - I then stack them however they will be stacked when the cake is done (2 -5's one on top of the other, 2 -8's one on top of the other - you get the picture) I leave them that way until the next day, they I take them and fill and crumb coat (again, making sure the one that was on the bottom is still on the bottom after crumb coating) I then ice and decorate them after they have set crumb coated for at least 8hours. I have always used cake mix based cakes, and have not once had a problem with it holding up. Hope this helps!

robinscakes Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 8:03pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

What I do may help you - I bake on Wednesday, cool, then wrap the cake in saran wrap - I then stack them however they will be stacked when the cake is done (2 -5's one on top of the other, 2 -8's one on top of the other - you get the picture) I leave them that way until the next day, they I take them and fill and crumb coat (again, making sure the one that was on the bottom is still on the bottom after crumb coating) I then ice and decorate them after they have set crumb coated for at least 8hours. I have always used cake mix based cakes, and have not once had a problem with it holding up. Hope this helps!




That's a good idea to stack them that way. Maybe I'll do that so I have a better chance of them not sinking too much. Like one of the other posters said, this is the flavor she requested (I looked at my order sheet and it's actually Betty Crocker cherry chip) I don't want to mess with it too much so I don't change what she likes about it.

indydebi Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 9:36pm
post #17 of 17

If you're nervous about the cake settling and leaving gaps, then it sounds like you're not letting the cake settle enough. I like them to sit at least overnight, crumb coated, to allow them to settle to the right height.

With a 3-layer (6" tall) cake, you might think about putting a cardboard between layer 2 and 3, with dowels supporting the cardboard, like you would with any other tier.

But I've done 3 tiers that have held up fine.

I think the key would be letting the cake set for awhile and naturally settle before you do the final icing.

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