Using 'cake Muggles'

Decorating By vtcake Updated 31 Jul 2009 , 1:50am by cakeschmake

vtcake Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 11:37pm
post #1 of 35

I am a huge Harry Potter fan, like so many others. And I realize the word Muggle is totally made up. However, it is used as a derogatory name depicting people who aren't wizards.

It really bothers me when decorators on here use the term muggle to refer to someone who doesn't decorate cakes. It seems like all of a sudden, a made up word is being bandied around bashing those whose artistic abilities lie elsewhere.

Does this bother anyone else, I wonder, or am I being overly sensitive?

Do more decorators than not really feel that superior to those who choose to buy their cakes?

34 replies
__Jamie__ Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 11:42pm
post #2 of 35

Are you kidding me??

__Jamie__ Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 11:43pm
post #3 of 35

And by the way, the derogatory term you are grasping for is....mudbloods, not Muggles, that term is perfectly acceptable amongst magical folk. (I can't belive ei am having this conversation.) icon_biggrin.gif

jonahsmom Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 11:45pm
post #4 of 35

O. M. G. icon_eek.gificon_confused.giftapedshut.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 11:51pm
post #5 of 35

Ok, I take back some of the snarkyness, you did ask if you were being overly sensitive...so yes, I think you are. icon_wink.gif

vtcake Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 11:51pm
post #6 of 35

That's ok, you can gasp and laugh, doesn't bother me.

icon_biggrin.gif

Doesn't affect my life at all. Just thinking out loud.

jonahsmom Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 12:07am
post #7 of 35

Sorry! I was thinking out loud, too! Truthfully, I was trying to figure out if you were serious or not. I thought maybe it was a play on how overly sensitive we have ALL been lately.

Seriously! We've all been so crabby! Not that we all have to agree all the time. I'm not naive enough to believe that will ever happen. It just seems we've been unusually touchy lately, that's all.

Doug Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 12:13am
post #8 of 35

not to burst a bubble or spell or charm

but even the grande dame of dictionaries --

the authority beyond all authority

the dictionary that will define a word to death.

The OED -- The Oxford English Dictionary

even it has deemed the word worthy of inclusion

http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/uk/newsid_2882000/2882895.stm

http://www.oed.com/help/updates/motswana-mussy.html

and yes, they too are saying it means those lacking in talent.

Deb_ Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 1:27am
post #9 of 35

Yes, you're being too sensitive.

is she really serious? cuz I'm thinking this has to be a joke........

Deb_ Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 1:28am
post #10 of 35

Ooops double post.......


Muggles? really? icon_confused.gif

jaybug Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 2:02am
post #11 of 35

Huh? icon_confused.gif

sweet-thing Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 2:06am
post #12 of 35

icon_eek.gif This is cracking me up!! Yes, I agree, way too sensitive. Jamie, you always make me laugh.

Those who do not do cakes ARE in fact "cake muggles" Not derogatory, just a fact.

I am just ROTFLMAO while I type this. Not making fun, just being entertained. This post made my night.
icon_biggrin.gif

DianeLM Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 2:28am
post #13 of 35

Don't worry vtcake. I'll take the focus off of you for a sec by admitting I've never read or seen any Harry Potter and didn't know until this thread that the word "muggle" originated there. *blush*

__Jamie__ Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 2:39am
post #14 of 35

Not taken from Google or any other source, just my years of Harry Potter fanaticism (is that a word?)

Muggle: Non magic folk; persons without magical abilities; can't fly, operate a broomstick, use the "Accio" spell, etc., etc.

Mugblood: A derogatory term penned by some snooty pureblood wizarding families to insult a witch or wizard who have muggles somewhere in their family tree. Example: Hermione Granger, Harry and Ron's best pal; her parents are both muggles. Dentists, to be exact. icon_wink.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 2:41am
post #15 of 35

My momma is a cake muggle, and I'd never insult my momma! Just kidding...I don't really talk like that. icon_biggrin.gif

Doug Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 2:42am
post #16 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Not taken from Google or any other source, just my years of Harry Potter fanaticism (is that a word?)

Muggle: Non magic folk; persons without magical abilities; can't fly, operate a broomstick, use the "Accio" spell, etc., etc.

Mugblood: A derogatory term penned by some snooty pureblood wizarding families to insult a witch or wizard who have muggles somewhere in their family tree. Example: Hermione Granger, Harry and Ron's best pal; her parents are both muggles. Dentists, to be exact. icon_wink.gif




not to mention Tom Riddle (aka HWSNBN) himself too! talk about bad bad bad self-esteem issues!

ps -- yes fanaticism is a real word -- just as Muggle is now too (thank you OED for saying so)

Deb_ Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 3:05am
post #17 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

My momma is a cake muggle, and I'd never insult my momma! Just kidding...I don't really talk like that. icon_biggrin.gif




Don't lie Jamie, you know you really talk like that........ icon_lol.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 3:19am
post #18 of 35

Hee hee....no really. Momma and "old man"....nails on a chalkboard I tell ya!

BlakesCakes Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 4:27am
post #19 of 35

Yes, I think you're being overly sensitive.

The context I get when I see it used here is someone who doesn't understand all of the work & effort that goes into making a cake--the person who thinks that it's "just flour & eggs", the person who thinks that you can magically make a 3 tier, custom cake appear in 3 hrs., the person who thinks that because the ingredients only cost $20 that you should donate your labor and only charge $15 , the person who wants to pay $10 for a 3-D sculpture of a Sorting Hat, etc.

Used here on CC, I've never seen it used to deride someone's talent, or lack thereof.

Rae

mcaulir Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 7:50am
post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtcake

Do more decorators than not really feel that superior to those who choose to buy their cakes?




I'm sure most professional decorators do feel superior in their decorating skills compared with those who have never done it, just like professional athletes feel their skills are superior to the average person etc.

Not a superior person, superior skills. I would hope that someone's skills would be superior to mine if I paid them to make a cake or fix my car or paint my house. icon_smile.gif

PinkZiab Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 12:39pm
post #21 of 35

I'm laughing my a$$ off at this post, and truly hoping you were only half-serious. I'm one of the biggest HP geeks around (including preparing to have the dark mark tattooed on my arm soon lol) and "Muggle" is NOT a derogatory term in the book... it's simply a word that means "non-magic folk" (to quote Hagrid). It's no different than a Jewish person using the word "Gentile" to describe someone who is not of their faith.

The derogatory word in the book used by some "pure blood" wizards to describe muggle-born wizards, or "half-blooded" (one muggle and one magical parent) is "Mudblood" (meaning dirty blood) and in their world it's considered a VERY bad insult that is not used in "polite company." From the reaction it gets from characters in the series, I would think it is likened to the "n" word.

So, for us, cake muggles, are just people who don't do cakes, and we use it because some people have no CLUE what is involved in creating these amazing designs. I watch food network and think we can pull these designs out of thin air in a few hours. Frankly, it's the perfect way to describe them, since the Muggles in HP are completely unaware of the magical world around them, and the "cake muggles" are completely unaware of what is involved in making a custom cake. I don't think any of us feel superior to our customers (okay maybe some of them lol--jk), we just possess a set of skills they do not. Just like I don't think my doctor, hairdresser, or dentist feel superior to me--they possess skills and training I do not and if they wanted to call me a "medical muggle" or "hair muggle," etc., well I'd find it funny.

sweet-thing Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 2:38pm
post #22 of 35

Funny stuff! Still laughing over here!! icon_lol.gif So happy I found this site. icon_smile.gif

Peridot Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 4:56pm
post #23 of 35

Well said PinkZiab. This place is really getting to be something. I too am laughing my self silly! What is the next word that is going to be misconstrued?

Peridot Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 4:58pm
post #24 of 35

Well said PinkZiab. This place is really getting to be something. I too am laughing my self silly! What is the next word that is going to be misconstrued?

Peridot Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 5:00pm
post #25 of 35

Well said PinkZiab. This place is really getting to be something. I too am laughing my self silly! What is the next word that is going to be misconstrued?

Mensch Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 5:01pm
post #26 of 35

HAHAHAHA.

This thread made my day!

__Jamie__ Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 5:01pm
post #27 of 35

http://www.scholastic.com/harrypotter/challenge/index.htm

Here ya go fellow HP geeks! Knock yourselves out! I know a lot, and this thing kicked my butt! icon_biggrin.gif

DeeDelightful Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 8:21pm
post #28 of 35

Just a little sensitive, maybe. I would consider myself a photography muggle, flower arranging muggle, automotive repair muggle...it's just people who "don't get IT", plain and simple. I think I read THE thread where the word originated on CC and don't believe any harm has been intended.

vtcake Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 3:04am
post #29 of 35

Ok, I give up...a few days have passed,and I'm feeling better. (I had just had surgery,.)

icon_confused.gif

I'll admit to being overly sensitive and HP thesaurus-challenged. tapedshut.gif

woodruffbn Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 3:17am
post #30 of 35

I had no idea what the origin of that word was and only half-guessed at what it meant because of the context in which it was used... I guess I'll have to go buy a HP book now...

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