Beating Buttercream To Much Or To Little??

Decorating By juslivin77 Updated 19 Jul 2009 , 10:31pm by masterchef

juslivin77 Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 3:18pm
post #1 of 15

I have been on this site for almost a year now just trying to absorb everything I can and it is actually started to confuse me! I am getting conflicting advice about buttercream (for one). Some people say beat the heck out of it to prevent airbubbles and some say mix it to much to high and it creates airbubbles. Which is the way to go? Does it depend on the recipe? I usually go with indydebi's or wilton..going to try sugarshacks next.

I keep trying new techniques and forgetting what I did the last time. Sometime I get air pockets and sometimes I dont.

14 replies
tiggy2 Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 3:30pm
post #2 of 15

Beating at a high speed will definitely cause air bubbles. I use indudebi and sugarshack's recipe and sugarshack's method of covering the top of the paddle with bc to keep from incorporating air into the recipe.

GL79 Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 3:37pm
post #3 of 15

Last time I got air bubbles on my frosting was for Father's Day. the only difference in that one was that when I make my frosting (Wilton's recipe) I seperate in bowls to add color. Usually when I add the color I mix it with the spatula and the frosting is fine. For Father's day, I finished doing the frosting and since I was going to use two colors, but the same shade, I used the mixer, when I was done with the lighter shade I mix it again with the mixer to make a darker shade and I thinks that's what caused it to create the bubbles in frosting. Hope this helps

indydebi Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 3:37pm
post #4 of 15

I beat it on high when I'm in a hurry and really need to pulverize the fat and get it blended faster.

It may make a difference on the recipe you're using, I don't know, but you're right ... there are lots of differing viewpoints on here. I think using a whip "whips in" air, but I've really never noticed added air when using a beater.

But that's why I love CC ..... so many experiences to draw from, ideas to chooose between, until you find the one that really works well for you.

juslivin77 Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:06pm
post #5 of 15

thanks all. i still have to figure out how big my kitchen aid mixer is before i try sugashacks! I will just keep trying different things untill I figure out what works for me...and actually keep track at what i try

goof9j Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:15pm
post #6 of 15

I have a 6 qt. mixer and used sugarshacks recipe for the 6 qt mixer. It was fantastic. The taste and texture is wonderful. You can't go wrong with her recipe.

Doug Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:15pm
post #7 of 15

try this for conflicting advice:

saw on a show once that a professional bakery doing those 50qt batches in a big ol' floor size hobart beat it for anywhere from 30 to 45 minutes!

---

personally: indydebi's recipe (tho often done 1/2 butter + 1/2 shortening)

all fats and liquids in and blend until all liquid incorporated and it's light and fluffy.

then sugar and dream whip.

down to 2 on my KS Pro600 and let it go "awhile" -- usually about 10 min, sometimes 15 --- until it has the right "mouth feel": smooth and not gritty

chilz822 Posted 18 Jul 2009 , 4:49am
post #8 of 15

I'm soooooo confused too... I've only really ever used the Buttercream Dream recipe on this site, but read so many rave reviews about indydebi's that I finally ventured out of the ol' comfort zone! Below is what I got... I don't even wanna show the whole cake, it turned out so weird! It tasted great, but I did something wrong obviously and I don't know what...
It was almost spongy and the more I tried to smooth it, the worse it got. this pic is the point that I stopped messing with it and took it to work... by the time I got there, it looked like a loofah! icon_biggrin.gif Spongy, holey, and bubbly...

What the heck? Help! I'd like to use it again, but now I'm gunshy! heh
LL

mrsmudrash Posted 18 Jul 2009 , 5:31am
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by chilz822

I'm soooooo confused too... I've only really ever used the Buttercream Dream recipe on this site, but read so many rave reviews about indydebi's that I finally ventured out of the ol' comfort zone! Below is what I got... I don't even wanna show the whole cake, it turned out so weird! It tasted great, but I did something wrong obviously and I don't know what...
It was almost spongy and the more I tried to smooth it, the worse it got. this pic is the point that I stopped messing with it and took it to work... by the time I got there, it looked like a loofah! icon_biggrin.gif Spongy, holey, and bubbly...

What the heck? Help! I'd like to use it again, but now I'm gunshy! heh




If you're using Crisco that might be the problem. It breaks down because they changed the formula and it isn't the hi-ratio as it was in the past. Try Sweetex and I bet you'll notice a difference!!!

juslivin77 Posted 18 Jul 2009 , 12:17pm
post #10 of 15

that is actually how most of my cakes end up. I am from FL too so I am just blaming it on the humidity!

I am making a cake this weekend so I am going to try beating the heck out of the fat on a high speed, do a triple batch filling my bowl ( a double didnt do it last time), and then mix for a long time on a low speed. That seems to match everyones tips!!

chilz822 Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 4:49pm
post #11 of 15

(sorry for the double post.. poltergeists have invaded CC!)

chilz822 Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 4:49pm
post #12 of 15

I've had great successess with Buttercream Dream in FL... always smooth on the cake, I just don't know what I did wong on indydeb's to make it so spongy. (I did beat the heck of it too!)

Unlimited Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 8:37pm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiggy2

covering the top of the paddle with bc to keep from incorporating air into the recipe.




This is correct. As long as you're making a full batch that completely covers your paddle, it won't incorporate air into your icing.

You can fix a batch of airy icing by adding liquid to it, but it still has to cover the top of the paddle completely. You can also try to fix the amount you need to use from the batch that isn't full by whipping it up a bit by hand with your spatula either in that bowl or a smaller one (also works if you buy a bucket of airy icing... you'll be able to see when your efforts are working to know when to stop!)

Big bakeries that use huge Hobarts can get away with mixing for extended time periods because the bowl is still full of enough icing to cover the paddle. (they just need to be around to turn it off before it eventually puffs up and the bowl overflows!)

bostonterrierlady Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 10:04pm
post #14 of 15

I made sugarshacks recipe the way she does it and I got lots of air bubbles. I do not know why.

masterchef Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 10:31pm
post #15 of 15

icon_cry.gif well, you have every reason to feel frustrated...hang in there, i will enlighten you on the subject...Buttercream icings are light, smooth mixtures of fat and sugar. They may also contain eggs to increase their smoothness or lightness. They may be easily flavored or colored to suit the occasion. There are many variations of Buttercream recipes. I will only mention the top 4.
#1-Simple buttercream
#2-Meringue-type butercream
#3-French buttercream
#4-Emergency buttercream (can be Fondant or Pastry cream type)

Butter is the preferred fat for buttercreams. However, butter makes a less stable icing because it melts so easily. There are 2 ways around this problem:
Use buttercreams only in cool weather or blend a small quantity of emulsifier shortening withe the butter to stablilize it.
If you are making the French Buttercream icing do the following:
While you are waiting for the sugar and water to reach its boiling temperature, beat the yolks at medium speed until they are thick and light. A soon as the water/sugar reaches 240
degrees pour it very very slowly into the beaten eggs while the mixer is running at second speed. Continue to beat until the mixture is completely cool and the yolks are very thick and light. While the mixer is still running, add the butter a little at a time as fast as it can be absorbed by the mixture. Beat in the vanilla. If the icing is too soft, refrigerate it until it firms enough to spread. Should you have any questions, feel free to email me. Chef, Louise
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