Does Fondant Freeze?????

Decorating By hammer1 Updated 18 Jul 2009 , 12:18pm by btflsimplicity86

hammer1 Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 11:58am
post #1 of 7

don't do fondant, but do fondant accent pieces. that being said, if i put a rather large piece of fondant on a buttercream cake that is to be frozen (must travel to Canada-16 hour trip), when it thaws will the fondant still be ok, will colors run etc?

6 replies
2SchnauzerLady Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 12:15pm
post #2 of 7

I would like to know, too.

2SchnauzerLady Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 12:17pm
post #3 of 7

I would like to know, too.

rugonna_eat_that Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 12:40pm
post #4 of 7

I had been told never to refridgerate a fondanted cake but no reason was given. That was all the motivation I needed. I decied to "stress test" fondant. I put several small, experimental cakes both in the fridge and the freezer. As long as I kept them covered in plastic wrap as they warmed up afterwards, the fondant was OK. Parts of the cake that were exposed to the air collected a lot of condensation and the fondant got very moist and gooey to the touch. It firmed up again as it dried and didn't crack but this might have just been dumb luck.

Areas painted with food coloring didn't run but could be smeared by touch.

I have tried this with both homemade and commercial (Satin Ice) fondant with similar results. I live in a fairly humid area (Nortern Virginia) and I'm not a scientist so I don't know if my results are based on humidity and altitude and all those other variables that screw with things like fondant and jello.

My homemade fondant tended to get a bit shinier if condensation was alowed to collect on it. The commercial fondant did not.

That is my experience.

hammer1 Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 11:05pm
post #5 of 7

anyone else, sure are a lot of questions posted today.

btflsimplicity86 Posted 18 Jul 2009 , 12:17pm
post #6 of 7

I did this once and learned my lesson. It wasn't a cake but the decorations. I had to store them for a couple days and didn't want them to dry out, because I had more work to do on them. So I figured I do it with buttercream why not fondant. Like many of the other replies when I took it out of the fridge it got very sticky and gooey almost like the consistency of wet playdoh, and mine were wrapped in plastic wrap icon_sad.gif it was a little man that I had put in the fridge for a bachlorette party cake. Any of the pieces that were touching and had color on them bled to the beige color. It was a mess. I ended up tossing it and starting over. Lesson learned the only thing I put in the fridge and freezer are crumbcoated cakes. Once decorated they stay out of chill. icon_smile.gif Hope this helps

btflsimplicity86 Posted 18 Jul 2009 , 12:18pm
post #7 of 7

I did this once and learned my lesson. It wasn't a cake but the decorations. I had to store them for a couple days and didn't want them to dry out, because I had more work to do on them. So I figured I do it with buttercream why not fondant. Like many of the other replies when I took it out of the fridge it got very sticky and gooey almost like the consistency of wet playdoh, and mine were wrapped in plastic wrap icon_sad.gif it was a little man that I had put in the fridge for a bachlorette party cake. Any of the pieces that were touching and had color on them bled to the beige color. It was a mess. I ended up tossing it and starting over. Lesson learned the only thing I put in the fridge and freezer are crumbcoated cakes. Once decorated they stay out of chill. icon_smile.gif Hope this helps

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