cakesbykerri Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 9:19pm
post #1 of

Hi all!

I did this cake last night at class. about 2 hours after I finished it it had a bubble on the left side of the flowers on the side of the cake. This morning the flowers were coming off (flower, buttercream, Fondant and all!)

Anyone know what could've gone wrong?

I used buttercream frosting. The flowers are made from royal icing

I frosted the cake and put it in the fridge while I rolled out the fondant.[/img]
LL

32 replies
enoid Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 9:32pm
post #2 of

Sorry I can't help with your problem but I just wanted to let you know I think your cake is lovely. I'm sure you will get an answer from several of the pros.

BitsnBites Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 9:33pm
post #3 of

Did you let it come to room temperature before applying the fondant? Sometimes that causes bubbles.

cakesbykerri Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 1:33am
post #4 of

Thank you all!

Meegh, No. I did not let the cake come to room temperature before I put the fondant....bummer.

Also, I had my cake in a cake carrier all night. I just read another thread that said that that was not a good idea.

Live & learn I guess.

brincess_b Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 9:11am
post #5 of

i would blame the temperature, not the cake carrier.
xx

Momkiksbutt Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 9:29am
post #6 of

Well, the cake carrier is partly to blame. Leaving it closed up in there can cause it to "sweat" alittle. At the very least it can keep it from getting cool air circulation. Fondant and gum paste are very picky when it comes to heat and moisture. Leaving the cake inside a plastic container, can contribute to both happening. Especially this time of the year, and depending on what area of the country you are in.

I am in the Pacific Northwest, we leave nothing like this out of the fridge, or in a place where it is likely to be negatively affected. Especially if it's going out to a client. If the heat doesn't get it, the humidity will. :/

From looking at your cake, and it's lovely by the way, you got a little of both. Sad, but a worthwhile lesson! Now you know! icon_smile.gif

Caking is a lesson of trial and error and eventually success! icon_wink.gif

sugarshack Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 6:12pm
post #7 of

the carrier is to blame.

sugarshack Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 6:14pm
post #8 of

the carrier is to blame.

sugarshack Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 6:16pm
post #9 of

the carrier is to blame.

__Jamie__ Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 6:17pm

I'd put my money on the carrier.

sugarshack Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 6:39pm

and in case u didn't catch it the fIrst 3 times, I think the carrier is to blame.

HHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

sugarshack Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 6:40pm

and in case u didn't catch it the fIrst 3 times, I think the carrier is to blame.

HHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

Momkiksbutt Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 10:01pm

LOL....yeah there is something funky happening to this site. I think it has to do with the many ads that are now embedded in it. Especially the animated ones...just sayin.....

You crack me up Sharon!

cakesbykerri Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 11:18pm

Are you saying that it may have been the cake carrier????? icon_smile.gif

Thanks for your help everyone. I'm just a beginner and I appreciate all the feedback.

sugarshack Posted 18 Jul 2009 , 3:14am

might have been. not sure though.






icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif

LittleLamb2 Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 2:55am

I had the same problem, except I had my cake class on Thursday night. Put the bottom tier in the cake carrier because my instructor had used my cake to show the class how to put in the plastic dowels and then we took it out. I thought it would be better in the cake carrier so that it wouldn't dry out from the hole. The top tier I left out on the counter. Then we went away for the weekend. Got back today and I noticed that the bottom tier was a little sweaty from being in the carrier so I opened it up and it seems fine now. But the top tier had a huge bubble in the side?? icon_cry.gif So what is to blame here? I have a wedding next month were I am delivering the cake 3 days before the wedding, what if this happens then?

MrsNewBaker Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 7:39pm

I have noticed that my icing seems shiny the 2nd day when i make cakes for home and keep them in my cake carrier - is this why??? icon_surprised.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 7:44pm

Yes. Don't put a fondant cake in a tightly sealed container. The humidity and the moisture from the cake and BC underneath will wreck it.

MrsNewBaker Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 8:13pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Yes. Don't put a fondant cake in a tightly sealed container. The humidity and the moisture from the cake and BC underneath will wreck it.




does the same go for buttercream as well??

MrsNewBaker Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 8:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Yes. Don't put a fondant cake in a tightly sealed container. The humidity and the moisture from the cake and BC underneath will wreck it.




does the same go for buttercream as well??

tiggy2 Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 8:43pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleLamb2

I had the same problem, except I had my cake class on Thursday night. Put the bottom tier in the cake carrier because my instructor had used my cake to show the class how to put in the plastic dowels and then we took it out. I thought it would be better in the cake carrier so that it wouldn't dry out from the hole. The top tier I left out on the counter. Then we went away for the weekend. Got back today and I noticed that the bottom tier was a little sweaty from being in the carrier so I opened it up and it seems fine now. But the top tier had a huge bubble in the side?? icon_cry.gif So what is to blame here? I have a wedding next month were I am delivering the cake 3 days before the wedding, what if this happens then?



icon_eek.gificon_surprised.gif So the cake will be 4 or 5 days old when it is served? That's a long time for a cake to sit out IMO but others may disagree.

LittleLamb2 Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 8:51pm

It was for my cake class and we were leaving to go camping for the weekend. We have had so much cake lately that we didn't want to eat it right away. We did end up having some on Monday night (4 days later). It was still moist and really good. The fondant must seal it pretty well. Still wondering about the bubble though?

__Jamie__ Posted 22 Jul 2009 , 8:57pm

I don't know. I just wouldn't ever put any cake in something that couldn't breathe.

tiggy2 Posted 23 Jul 2009 , 1:21am

I was talking about the wedding cake being delivered 3 days before the wedding.

cindy1176 Posted 23 Jul 2009 , 1:32am

Wow...I never thought about a cake not breathing in a cake carrier! I learn something new here every single day, lol! Oh, I was wondering about delivering 3 days before the wedding also...seems kinda long for a cake to sit uneaten, lol.

LittleLamb2 Posted 23 Jul 2009 , 2:30am

I told that to the customer and said I couldn't guarantee what the cake would be like but they said they were ok with that. My question was about the bubble in the cake that was not in the carrier not the freshness of the cake itself.

cindy1176 Posted 23 Jul 2009 , 1:33pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleLamb2

I told that to the customer and said I couldn't guarantee what the cake would be like but they said they were ok with that. My question was about the bubble in the cake that was not in the carrier not the freshness of the cake itself.




Sorry about going off topic about freshness...no answer for your bubble, but sometimes there are no answers...cakes have a mind of their own it seems icon_lol.gif

aligotmatt Posted 23 Jul 2009 , 1:51pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleLamb2

I had the same problem, except I had my cake class on Thursday night. Put the bottom tier in the cake carrier because my instructor had used my cake to show the class how to put in the plastic dowels and then we took it out. I thought it would be better in the cake carrier so that it wouldn't dry out from the hole. The top tier I left out on the counter. Then we went away for the weekend. Got back today and I noticed that the bottom tier was a little sweaty from being in the carrier so I opened it up and it seems fine now. But the top tier had a huge bubble in the side?? icon_cry.gif So what is to blame here? I have a wedding next month were I am delivering the cake 3 days before the wedding, what if this happens then?




I don't want to jack the thread, but it seems like the OP was answered...

Make sure your cake settles before decorating it, put something heavy-ish on top if you have to. trim, cover it in fondant. be very meticulous to make there are no bubbles at this time. poke them with an exacto or something if you have them.

I've done a couple of cakes that had to sit out for a while, not for a customer, all family cakes that we toted along on vacation, and when they were served, everyone said it was the best cake they ever had. And they were still really moist and tasty.

Momkiksbutt Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 5:45am

Well, in the case of delivery of a cake that won't be served for several days, you can always put it in the fridge, uncovered. The main thing is to make sure that your customer knows that you will not guarantee the freshness of the cake if it is delivered that early. That covers you if there is a spoilage or any other kind of problem.

SugarFrosted Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 7:28am

I've been making buttercream cakes and putting them in clear plastic boxes for over 20 years. I present the cake to my client in the cake box and they return the box to me sometime in the next few days, sometimes a week. They tell me they love the box because it keeps the cake from drying out, and if they have leftovers, the last piece is just as moist and delicious as the first, even days later. I have never...I repeat...NEVER ...had any issues of shininess or anything falling off because the cake was in the plastic carrier/cakebox. I don't do fondant, so I can only assume this is a fondant issue.

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