Could It Be The Cake Pan?

Decorating By GHOST_USER_NAME Updated 25 Sep 2009 , 1:43am by tigerhawk83

GHOST_USER_NAME Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 5:50am
post #1 of 10

Hi Everyone! I'm a newby here & also a newby in the "cake world". I've only had one class in the Wilton's First Course. I look forward to learning more. Questions...I used a 9inch round cake pan. It is 2 inches deep. I baked that batter for an hour or so & it still wasn't done in the middle, just barely thickened. Grrr! lol I thought I read where you are suppose to fill the pans 3/4ths full. Maybe not. Do you bake the deep pan cakes at a higher temp maybe?
Also I used Pam on 2 other cakes (pans) I baked & let them cool. They still stuck to the bottom!! I used 2 Pillsbury Classic Yellow Moist Supreme cake mixes. Do you all like that brand or prefer another? Maybe a dumb question, but asking anyway...When you need 2 cake mixes, it IS alright to mix them up together in same bowl isn't it? I have to take an iced cake to class tomorrow, so will have to make a cake from scratch or go buy more mixes. I appreciate your help! Annie

9 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 7:54am
post #2 of 10

Welcome to Cake Central icon_biggrin.gif

A 9" round should have baked in an hour...how hot was your oven? Do you have a rose nail? You can spray the rose nail with Pam and put it upside down in the middle of the pan and it will help the middle get done. It also helps it to bake flatter so you don't have to cut as much off when you level it.

I tried the spray with the flour in it for the first time a couple of weeks ago and it works much better than plain Pam...but one important thing is to be sure you let the cake cool a little while before you turn it out of the pan, no matter what kind of spray you're using on the pan.

I like Duncan Hines cake mixes but there are some people who swear by everything BUT Duncan Hines...it just depends on your personal preferences. I used to use Pillsbury all the time because it was about 20 cents cheaper than Duncan Hines, but one time they were out of white Pillsbury mixes and I tried Duncan Hines and I've been using it ever since.

and yes, you can mix two mixes in the same bowl together.

G_Cakes Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 8:13am
post #3 of 10

Hi Annie and Welcome to CC...

First off if your cakes are still sticking to the bottom of your pan you can use cake release,I got a recipe here from a fellow CC'er who's name escapes me at the moment but I have never ever used anythin else since.

1 cup flour
1 cup oil
1 cup shortening and mix well, store in an air tight container, I keep mine in the fridge.

Your cakes will fall out of the pan and I doubt you will ever use Pam again for any thing you bake icon_smile.gif

Now regarding your cake not getting baked all the way through, there are a couple of solutions you can use to help that out.

Texas Rose is right where you could use a rose nail in the pan but I prefer to use bake strips. You can buy them online, any bake supply store like Michaels or Bulk Barn (Canada) or perhaps there available where you are doing your Wiltons classes at.

I always bake at a lower temperature than what the box suggests , so if they say 350 I go 325 or sometime 300.

Your cakes will take a little longer to bake but I find they bake without the edges getting super crusty and hard and I find that my cakes are moister this way too.

Talk with your Wilton instructor, I am sure she will guide you and you will learn a great deal in the end.

Hope this Helps icon_smile.gif

KimmyO Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 2:35pm
post #4 of 10

Sorry but I think this one is operator error.

I spray my pans liberally with Pam and then use some of my cake mix to flour them. I just put a bit in the pan and roll it around and then dump the excess back into the bowl that I am mixing my cake in.

Yes, you can mix two or three or four mixes at a time in one bowl assuming you trust your math skills and the size of your bowl. The most I can get in a bowl is three and that is a tight squeeze.

Invest in the bake even strips - these are SO worth the money. They do slow the cooking time down a bit but you will get a much more even cake and not have to worry too much about leveling the cakes after baking.

On larger cakes you can lower your temp to 325 and bake a bit longer. Just keep checking. You will get the feel for your own oven soon enough. I also have a thermometer hanging in my oven as the temp I set on the stove top control is not always what happens in the oven. Learn your ovens quirks - they all have them.

Good luck.

KimmyO Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 2:35pm
post #5 of 10

Sorry but I think this one is operator error.

I spray my pans liberally with Pam and then use some of my cake mix to flour them. I just put a bit in the pan and roll it around and then dump the excess back into the bowl that I am mixing my cake in.

Yes, you can mix two or three or four mixes at a time in one bowl assuming you trust your math skills and the size of your bowl. The most I can get in a bowl is three and that is a tight squeeze.

Invest in the bake even strips - these are SO worth the money. They do slow the cooking time down a bit but you will get a much more even cake and not have to worry too much about leveling the cakes after baking.

On larger cakes you can lower your temp to 325 and bake a bit longer. Just keep checking. You will get the feel for your own oven soon enough. I also have a thermometer hanging in my oven as the temp I set on the stove top control is not always what happens in the oven. Learn your ovens quirks - they all have them.

Good luck.

2SchnauzerLady Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 2:52pm
post #6 of 10

Do invest in an oven thermometer. As KimmyO says, what is on the control is not always the actual temp. Especially if your oven has any age to it. I bake all my cakes at 325, it takes longer, but they come out moist. I also use the bake even strips and for larger cakes, you can put in a flower nail, flate side down, I spray with Bakers' Joy, then pour in your batter. That will ensure your cake centers bake, too, and speed the cooking time. Flip your cake out after about 10 minutes to your cooling rack, and VOILA, there is your flower nail, ready to be removed and only leaving a tiny hole in the center!
I use the WASC recipie on the recipies here on cc. It starts with a cake mix (I use Duncan Hines), and then you add other ingredients. My co-workers are totally sold on the WASC - they are my taste testers and are not shy in giving their opinions. HTH

Kitcake Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 3:23pm
post #7 of 10

The Bake Even strips are great and you can make your own. Just take an old bath towel and cut it in strips long enough to go around your pan and as wide as the depth of your pan. Wet them, wring out excess water and secure around your pan with a "T" pin or safety pin. They work great to keep your cake level and moist. I also always bake my cakes at 300-325. It takes longer but it's worth it. Happy Baking!! icon_biggrin.gif

newbysara Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 8:49pm
post #8 of 10

Wow mom you got some great responses to that!! I'll have to try the flower nail and the towel strips tricks!

prterrell Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 8:52pm
post #9 of 10

If a 9"x2" round cake didn't bake in an hour, then your oven is running very cold. Get an oven thermometer stat! Two-inch deep pans are not considered deep (deep pans would be 3 or 4 inch deep!).

How long did you leave the cakes in the pan to cool? 10 minutes is all you should be doing before turning them out. If you leave them to cool completely in the pan, they might stick.

I use PAM w/ flour and spray very liberally and never have my cakes stick.

9" isn't really that big, so you should have to have a flower nail or bake even strips to get that cake to bake evenly through.

tigerhawk83 Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 1:43am
post #10 of 10

OK - all of a sudden I can't get cakes done either. I'm using a 8x3" pan, using baking strips and a flower nail. I've tested my oven temp and when I set 350, my thermometer reads 350. I'm baking on the center rack and I just can't seem to get them right anymore - my first cakes were great and they've gone downhill since then. And the tops are burning.

Wilton says bake this pan at 350 - another website says deeper pans should be 325. Should I lower the temp? Should I go to a lower rack? Am I overfilling my pans (again some say half full, some say 2/3 full)? I'm very disgusted right now icon_sad.gif

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