Confused About Servings

Decorating By Pebbles1727 Updated 14 Jul 2009 , 11:29pm by xstitcher

Pebbles1727 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 7:21pm
post #1 of 21

Hi everyone,
I'm getting so confused about all of this serving charts and how many people specific size cake will feed. How many would you say 10-8-6 will feed? I need about 75-80 servings for my boy's birthday party, and don't feel comfortable going pass 3 tiers. Would it be wise to make additional 9x13 just to make sure everyone got cake. I'll just do 9x13 in the same color with simple borders-no decorations. Since it's for my son, I don't necessary want to stick to "wedding" servings, just want to make sure I have enough cake for everyone and at the same time do not want to be stuck with too much cake leftover.
Thank you all in advance and for your patience, I may be asking a whole bunch of questions in the next few weeks as I'm getting ready for my pumpkin's big 5.
Thanks again, P

20 replies
brincess_b Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 7:29pm
post #2 of 21

for most people, a wedding serving is enough cake. i think indydebi has pis of what a slice looks like - its bigger than it sounds.
10=38
8=24
6=12
= 74
id say you will be fine. maybe an extra 6 if you want piece of mind.
you could do the maths for wedding sized 9x13, wilton only gives party size = 45 - thats a load of extra cake.
xx

xstitcher Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 7:33pm
post #3 of 21

duplicate post

xstitcher Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 7:34pm
post #4 of 21

Here's a couple of links to Wilton's Party Serving Guide depending on the size of you pans. Instead of the 1X2 sizes you get for a wedding they are for 1.5X2. Hope that helps.

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-3-inch-pans.cfm

matthewkyrankelly Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 7:34pm
post #5 of 21

At 5, kids definitely eat a wedding size piece. Guests often do as well. For my family, many of the guests playfully announce that they won't go home unless they have cake to go with them. I usually send a 5 or more serving piece with them because they like it so much. And it's family. So, right now, you should be good. But if yoou have my kind of family, just up the sizes.

Pebbles1727 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 7:44pm
post #6 of 21
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But if yoou have my kind of family, just up the sizes.




That's one of the reasons I'm worried and confused about servings. There will be only about 24 kids of my sons age (4-6). The rest are older children and adults. It seems that when it comes to any kind of party we host, EVERYBODY shows up. Must have something to do is that we feed them and feed them good icon_biggrin.gif

xstitcher Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 8:25pm
post #7 of 21

Here's a link to indydebi's how to cut a wedding cake if it helps you visualize the size of the cake:

http://www.cateritsimple.com/id10.html

Pebbles1727 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 8:34pm
post #8 of 21

So, what I'm undestanding is that 10-8-6 combination will most likely not provide enough to feed 80 people if I use party serving sizes, correct?

brincess_b Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 8:46pm
post #9 of 21

party size only gives you 60.
xx

Pebbles1727 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 8:59pm
post #10 of 21

What would be the best tier sizes to give me at least 80 servings if I wanted to keep 3 tiers (don't feel very comfortable with 4-never done it)?

xstitcher Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 9:02pm
post #11 of 21

12/10/8 = 88 party servings

brincess_b Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 9:22pm
post #12 of 21

what better time to experiment with 4 tiers when its your own family, and you are quite happy to have a bit spare cake? worth thinking about anyway.
xx

Pebbles1727 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 10:20pm
post #13 of 21
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what better time to experiment with 4 tiers when its your own family, and you are quite happy to have a bit spare cake? worth thinking about anyway




3 tiers are already an experiment-I never done those either. I think 4 tiers will be pushing it.

Will 12-9-6 provide enough?

matthewkyrankelly Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 10:20pm
post #14 of 21

You certainly could just up the sizes of the tiers to 12/10/8. That's a fun cake to do. However, I agree with brincess_b that what better time to try a four? It is friends and family. And, if you can do a three, you can do a four. It is not harder, especially when it is home and doesn't have to travel far! I think you should go for it!

Pebbles1727 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 10:31pm
post #15 of 21

Two tiers is the most I ever done and this cake will have to travel for about 15 minutes to the local pool. 4 tiers scarry me just a little bit. How much will 12-10-8-6 will serve anyway?
Will 12-10-8 look ok? It just seems like having an 8 inch on top will make the cake look unfinished because of the surface area. Will 12-9-6 look better and provide necesary amount of servings?
Thanks, P

xstitcher Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 10:38pm
post #16 of 21
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Originally Posted by Pebbles1727

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what better time to experiment with 4 tiers when its your own family, and you are quite happy to have a bit spare cake? worth thinking about anyway



3 tiers are already an experiment-I never done those either. I think 4 tiers will be pushing it.

Will 12-9-6 provide enough?




12/9/6 = 76 servings

If you click on the links I provided it will give the # of servings for the various size pans then you can play around with the sizes to figure what is best for you. The first link was for 2" deep pans and the 2nd for 3" deep pans. HTH! icon_smile.gif

Pebbles1727 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 10:41pm
post #17 of 21
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The first link was for 2" deep pans and the 2nd for 3" deep pans.




Well, that confuses me as well. Why in the world does it matter what size pans I use, if the finished tier is 4 inches in height?

kputski Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 10:50pm
post #18 of 21

I did a "Sweet 16" cake for my daughter. I did double layers of 10/8/6. We chunked off pretty generous servings, and we fed between 35-40 servings with it. Now, this was done not really controlling portion size, but just whacking off a good chunk, as teenagers are sugar freaks as a rule.

A wedding cake I did was supposed to serve about 75. I did this same configuration, only I added a 10" double layer, frosted plainly to cover for lack. They said it did the job.

My general rule of thumb on birthday parties is to go with the 10/8/6 for anything under 30, then go from there.

xstitcher Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 11:05pm
post #19 of 21
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Originally Posted by Pebbles1727

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The first link was for 2" deep pans and the 2nd for 3" deep pans.



Well, that confuses me as well. Why in the world does it matter what size pans I use, if the finished tier is 4 inches in height?




The 2" serving guide will yield 4" of height based on 2 layers (2X2)and the 3" only yields 3" in height as it only uses one layer.

If you look at the heading under the # of servings column it will tell you how many layers they are basing their approximate servings amounts on. The only difference between the two is the overall height of the cake and slightly more cake. They still yield the same amount of servings. If you were to go with the 2" pans the serving sizes would be 1.5x2x4 and the 3" pans would give you 1.5x2x3.

Hope that helps with the confusion.

Pebbles1727 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 11:20pm
post #20 of 21

Thank you so much, I think I got it,
P

xstitcher Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 11:29pm
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pebbles1727

Thank you so much, I think I got it,
P




Glad I could help! icon_smile.gif

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