Help!!!

Decorating By Ecope Updated 14 Jul 2009 , 2:46pm by Ecope

Ecope Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 5:35am
post #1 of 7

So I have a cake order. My very first paid one.
And I'm freaking out. Mainly because I tried to carve the cake tonight and it completely fell apart. WARNING: This might be long.

So, here's what I'm doing...
I'm baking this cake on a 16 inch cake pan- 2 layers. I put them on top of each other tonight to carve them prior to freezing so that I'd have the shape. The cake was REALLY sticky- the 2 layers were sticking to each other. The carving went really well. It was the separating of the 2 that broke it. The cakes just crumbled!

So, any ideas as to how I can make sure the top and bottom layers are carved the same shape? I'm using a stencil and using food writers to do an outline. Should I just cut separately, that way I can freeze separately until I'm ready to carve... Or, do you put the filling in before you carve so you don't need to separate?

Also, how much would you charge for this... it is 2 layers chocolate with chocolate mousse and strawberries filling- which I don't even know if I just add fresh fruit to the chocolate mousse recipe I found on here?
The whole thing would be piped buttercream- you know the drop star one. It's in the shape of a lion's head. For some reason, I can't upload the photo.

I totally appreciate ANY help!!
I'm going nuts and definitely frustrated!! I'm almost ready to buy them a cake!!

6 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 5:49am
post #2 of 7

I would fill and then carve, especially something that size.

My hand aches in sympathy for you having to pipe a million little stars icon_biggrin.gif I can't help at all on the pricing except to say that when people charge for a carved cake, they charge for the number of servings they had to bake, not the number they end up with...so if you have a per-serving charge in mind, then you'd figure out the servings for a 16" cake and charge for that.

anasasi Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 5:49am
post #3 of 7

I don't know anything about the pricing since I haven't made cakes for anyone besides friends and family, however, maybe I can help a bit with the carving. I'm assuming from what you wrote that you are carving a 3D cake. I've carved a number of cakes and I find it much easier to fill and chill them prior to carving....especially if you're trying to match up layers when carving. Or, often times what I do is freeze the layers seperately and then when I'm ready I allow them to defrost to the point where they're still slightly firm but easily carved. I then fill the layers, stack them and carve them right away. Haven't had any problems doing it this way so far. HTH!

poohthebear Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 5:51am
post #4 of 7

I freeze my cakes seprately. Then when I'm ready filling and carving while the cake is still pretty much frozen. Can't wait to see finish product.

JaimeAnn Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 6:18am
post #5 of 7

That is the best way .... wrap and freeze each layer.. and carve while still firm.

depending on how you are filling , I would probably carve before filling . If you make a dam and fill then stack & carve.. you would be cutting away the dam when you carve.

You shouldn't have the sticking problem with them if they are frozen and you can stack & carve then remove the top layer to fill, then replace.

HTH

Ruth0209 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 6:35am
post #6 of 7

You might be able to put parchment paper between them and either carve around it or cut it as you go. Then when you're ready to separate the layers, slip a spatula in between the layers to get you hands under the parchment and lift it off. If you froze or chilled it after you carved it, it'll be easier to put back on when you fill it.

Ecope Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 2:46pm
post #7 of 7

Thanks everyone!!

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