Hmmmm? Piping Gel Or Royal?

Decorating By mw902 Updated 13 Jul 2009 , 10:40pm by Dessert_Diva

mw902 Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 1:35pm
post #1 of 9

Hey all!

So what do you thing the dragees are put on the cake with piping gel or a tad of royal? I have not used piping gel so I am wondering if it is strong enough to hold the dragees on?

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo-1338830.html

Thanks for your help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Michelle

8 replies
-K8memphis Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 1:47pm
post #2 of 9

That's such a pretty cake. You could use either.

Not many people know this but the Great Wall of China has held up for all these centuries under the amazing vise grip holding power of piping gel. You won't find that in the history books though--state secret. Ever try to open a container of piping gel if a teeny tiny little bit got under the lid???? icon_biggrin.gif You can cut it open easier.

Seriously, either one.

mw902 Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 1:59pm
post #3 of 9

Thanks Kate!!!! LOLOLOL, like I said I have never used piping gel so I wasnt sure if its slippery or not, but thats what I wanted to use so you can't see it!!! Thanks for your answer, and for the history lesson! LOL!

-K8memphis Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 2:06pm
post #4 of 9

Since we're on the subject--less is more--use a teensy amount, just to moisten and I'd want to put it onto softer fondant--I'd want to apply them right away after fondanting.

So then also you'd want to have a few hours (minimum) after applying them for them to set up before delivery so they don't bounce off.

In order for the juju you use for glue to not show--you might even want to put on a dot of whatever then wipe it off leaving just a film.

Just some details--too much info maybe but there it is.

icon_biggrin.gif

-K8memphis Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 2:14pm
post #5 of 9

And here's another thought--I just can't shut up--slap a little piece of smooth fondant onto the side of a cake pan--don't cover the whole thing just a piece--then practice applying them--wait a few hours & see how they've stuck on. Maybe you will want to have the fondant crust up a bit--if you use too much they kinda sink in and look soggy.

Ok--I'll shut up now...probably-- icon_biggrin.gif

Dessert_Diva Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 3:05pm
post #6 of 9

On NO please keep going...I wanted to ask anyway what the other purposes of piping gel are. I used it as glue for gumpaste pieces on the side of a fondant covered cake, but it took a while to dry and I constantly had to straighten the pieces because they would slip. Why else would I use it besides paying Wilton along with all the other products they say I can't live w/o... icon_lol.gif

Dessert_Diva Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 3:10pm
post #7 of 9

On NO please keep going...I wanted to ask anyway what the other purposes of piping gel are. I used it as glue for gumpaste pieces on the side of a fondant covered cake, but it took a while to dry and I constantly had to straighten the pieces because they would slip. Why else would I use it besides paying Wilton along with all the other products they say I can't live w/o... icon_lol.gif

-K8memphis Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 10:03pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dessert_Diva

On NO please keep going...I wanted to ask anyway what the other purposes of piping gel are. I used it as glue for gumpaste pieces on the side of a fondant covered cake, but it took a while to dry and I constantly had to straighten the pieces because they would slip. Why else would I use it besides paying Wilton along with all the other products they say I can't live w/o... icon_lol.gif




Piping gel takes food color well and can be used for water and 'clear' kinda stuff. It really is amazing glue. See you mighta had too much on your pieces so that's why they slipped--when you adhere fondant & gum paste & stuff you just want to moisten the surface--like I said you can often wipe off most of the pg and leave the surface moist and it adheres and holds while it dries and sets up--otherwise you get the drooping thing going on huh.

Took me for freaking ever to learn otherwise. Scott Clark Wooley taught me that at an ICES demo--to use a moistened surface. Yes!

Dessert_Diva Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 10:40pm
post #9 of 9

Thanks so much!!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%