I Have To Vent!!!

Decorating By 2SimplySweet Updated 17 Jul 2009 , 4:39pm by staten93

2SimplySweet Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 8:54pm
post #1 of 27

I had chocolate cake and crumbs!!!!! I just can't get past the crumbs. No matter what I do there they are!!!! I crumb coat it but of course the crumb coat is full of crumbs and then when I ICE THE CAKE YOU CAN SEE THEM!!! I am having a pitty party today. HELP!!

26 replies
Karema Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 10:06pm
post #2 of 27

This can be annoying but I've gotten a little better. I make sure that my first coat is not to thick. So I add a few extra tsp of water to thin it out then I do the crumb coat. Then when I crumb coat I don't run the knife over the same place twice. Then I put it in the fridge until it chills then I take it out and ice it again. Then I let that sit and usually I don't have crumbs. The trick is not to let your knife ever touch the cake or run the spatula or knive backwards.

Good luck
Karema

2SimplySweet Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 1:11am
post #3 of 27

Thanks so nuch for the advice!! This is a weak spot that I need to overcome. icon_rolleyes.gif

2SimplySweet Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 1:11am
post #4 of 27

Thanks so much for the advice!! This is a weak spot that I need to overcome. icon_rolleyes.gif

conb Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 1:20am
post #5 of 27

I crumb coat the cake with a thin layer of buttercream and then let it rest for at least 30 minutes. Once it crusts over I icing it with little problem. However if it does not rest long enough I get crumbs too. icon_sad.gif It gets better with practice.

dldbrou Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 3:41am
post #6 of 27

I know lots of bakers crumb coat, but my teacher taught me to seal the cake instead. It is powdered sugar, water & salt. It is a very thin consistency. You can actually pour it onto the to of the cake and smooth it all over. It then dries and hardens. I find that it helps keep the cake moist as well as keeping the crumbs from showing up.

Rainbow Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 4:00am
post #7 of 27

I use an Icer tip. I haven't had trouble with crumbs ever since and my icing is the same all over the cake.

Sue

leahk Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 4:08am
post #8 of 27

Here's another vote for the icing tip- it has made all the difference for me!

__Jamie__ Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 4:11am
post #9 of 27

I rarely crumbcoat, and never have crumbs. Too lazy. The trick, whether or not you crumbcoat, is spatula control. Don't swish it around, and don't pull it straight out from your icing. This is why you get crumbs.

Melchas Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 4:18am
post #10 of 27

I agree with Jaime. I rarely crumb coat my cakes, just laziness, and I never have crumbs show up. You have to get a thick amount of icing on your cake and only move in a forward motion, never lift up!

sillywabbitz Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 4:26am
post #11 of 27

Using homemade cake release to prep the pans has help me a ton. I still crumb coat with really thin icing and fridge for 15 minutes. Then ice. I have yet to get the hang of the icer tip but I'm still trying. Cake release is equal parts flour, oil and flour. Apply to pan with pastry brush. I think the recommendations on spatula movement are also helpful.

makeminepink Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 4:27am
post #12 of 27

I agree with _Jamie_ too. I don't crumbcoat. Be sure and have enough frosting on your spatula, don't pull it straight off the icing and if you do get crumbs on your spatula, never just keep going. Stop right then and wipe your spatula.

MLand Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 4:30am
post #13 of 27

I crumb coat also. I watched a video on youtube (Edna's I think) that said keep enough icing on your spatula so that you don't hit the crumb coat.

SugarFrosted Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 7:29am
post #14 of 27

Here's another vote for the icer tip. I never crumb coat, and I never see crumbs. Also, the thickness of my frosting is consistant all over the cake.

dhccster Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 7:41am
post #15 of 27

I use the icer tip as well. And I don't let the spatula ever touch the cake. Good luck with your next chocolate cake!!

mixinvixen Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 9:55am
post #16 of 27

i have a cheap plastic, coffee pot looking thing, i think it's originally from dollar general, that has a small heating ring in the bottom and a flip up lid. i put water in it deep enough to cover my spatulas, plug it in and set the small dial to high, and within a minute, literally!, my water is boiling.

i start out by putting a big dollop of icing on the top with a plastic spatula, and have two metal off set spatulas getting hot in the water. when they are hot, i switch out between the two to spread my icing...works like a charm!!!!!!!!

the key is taking the spatula out of the water, swiping it through a dry towel, and then using it to spread the icing for only 20 seconds or so...back in the water it goes, and changeout to the next spatula.

THIS ESPECIALLY WORKS WELL FOR CARVED CAKES THAT ARE SMOOSHED TOGETHER AND ARE FULL OF LOOSE CRUMBS.

OregonCakeLady Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:06pm
post #17 of 27

Be sure to chill the cake between crumb coat and final layer. Sometimes you need to do three layers of icing. Just make sure that they are super thin. Also, be sure you are working with cold cake. Don't even try to ice room temperature red velvet or chocolate.

Allidsk8 Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:16pm
post #18 of 27

I have the same problem dldbrou, what are the proportions for the "cake seal" please?

LovesPekes Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:21pm
post #19 of 27

I use the method that Sugarshack shows in her video. I've iced several chocolate cakes and have yet to experience crumbs in my icing. I'm still pretty new to cake decorating but feel that her DVD is well worth the money especially for beginners.

She has certainly taught me more in this one DVD than I learned in several classes that I took.

LovesPekes Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:24pm
post #20 of 27

I use the method that Sugarshack shows in her video. I've iced several chocolate cakes and have yet to experience crumbs in my icing. I'm still pretty new to cake decorating but feel that her DVD is well worth the money especially for beginners.

She has certainly taught me more in this one DVD than I learned in several classes that I took.

matthewkyrankelly Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:24pm
post #21 of 27

Try some of these methods posted here. I always crumb coat, but sometimes wonder why. Have you tried chilling (freezing - gasp!) the cake before frosting? It works wonders.

The good dollop of frosting also does the trick

And technique. You can probably identify when you get crumbs. When you move your spatula, it is not like the cake commercials where you playfully move the frosting back and forth across the cake.

This is what I do. A good smear around the sides. Depending on the cake, you might dip into the frosting ten times to get thick globs to stick and cover the sides. It is not necessarily pretty . Once, it is covered in a rough way, all of your crumbs are covered unless you dig into the side of the cake. Now go around the cake to smooth. Don't worry about the top edge.

Next cover the top in the same way making sure there is enough frosting so that the crumbs stay sealed. Smooth the frosting in one circular direction(for a round cake), making sure the entire top is covered in frosting.

Once this is done, clean your spatula and gently pull in the rough edges along the top edge.

pianocat Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:26pm
post #22 of 27

Icing Tip!!!!!!Lots of icing (some will be removed in the smoothing process). I don't crumb coat when I use the icing tip-don't need to if you are careful with your spatula

dldbrou Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:27pm
post #23 of 27

Allidsk8, this is straight from my teacher's notes from 30 years ago and it has never failed me.

Sealer Recipe

1 2/3 Cup Confectioners Sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon flavoring
about 1/2 cup water (more or less)

Mix ingredients to a spreading consistency. It should have the thickness of Karo syrup as it is on the shelf. Brush on sides and top of cake with a pastry brush. Allow from 2 to 5 hours (depending on Humidity) for it to dry.

Hope this helps. thumbs_up.gif

DeeDelightful Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:29pm
post #24 of 27

I crumbcoat sometimes. But i ALWAYS put a ton of icing on top of the cake and push it across the top of the cake and over the sides with the spatula. then i gently push the excess icing on the sides with a small offset spatula (cause i have more control over the small spatula). if the icing is at least a half inch thick on top (maybe more), you won't get crumbs, but still DO NOT pick up your spatula...just push to the edges and slide off. it does help to keep the spatula warm and dry.

Allidsk8 Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:30pm
post #25 of 27

thank you dldbrou. I will try it this weekend icon_biggrin.gif

Allidsk8 Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:34pm
post #26 of 27

thank you dldbrou. I will try it this weekend icon_biggrin.gif

staten93 Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 4:39pm
post #27 of 27

I never crumb coat either because I am lazy. I think finding a really good chocolate buttercream recipe is important. I like gourmetcakes crusting chocolate fudge buttercream. The recipe is here on CC. Like everyone said lots of frosting, don't pull the icing and don't pick up your spatula. Good luck.

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