kirs1019 Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 5:54pm
post #1 of

I'm making a few 3-tiered cakes this week (base 10 inches, middle 8 inches, top 6 inches) and I'm just curious about how many cups of batter should go in each pan.

Thanks so much!

22 replies
Price Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 6:08pm
post #2 of

Round
6" 2C batter
8" 4 Cups
10" 6 Cups
12" 7 1/2 cups
14" 10Cups


Square

4" 1 1/2 cups
6" 3 cups
8" 6 cups
10" 8 cups

jab2004 Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 6:13pm
post #3 of

This is quite a handy link, it's got all the pan sizes and depths.

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

Rylan Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 11:41pm
post #4 of

It depends on the recipe. Some recipes require only a bit of batter than regular.

sweetiesbykim Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 11:55pm
post #5 of

I use an ice cream/cookie dough scoop, in the largest size, to scoop batter into my pans. I record on each recipe how many scoops for each size cake I have made (6"round=3 scoops) which takes a lot of guess work out of it. Then, I also know how many times to multiply the recipe since I also record how many total scoop in each recipe. My chocolate cake batter is real thin and rises a lot, so it's a different calculation than my butter cakes, for instance. HTH icon_smile.gif

JaimeAnn Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 12:03am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by RylanTy

It depends on the recipe. Some recipes require only a bit of batter than regular.





I Agree... some of my cake recipes take less batter than others...

Are you using a cake mix, scratch, extender recipe? it all depends...

buggus Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 1:55pm
post #7 of

I'm resurrecting this post, as I need to know myself how much batter to use for my cakes. I making an 8, 10 and 14 inch cake this weekend, and the pans are all 3 inches deep. I've decided to make the tiers 6 inches high, so I'll have to double up the cakes. I've looked at this link: http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-3-inch-pans.cfm and I'm confused..does it really take 19 cups of batter for a 14 inch cake??

sweetiesbykim Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 2:38pm
post #8 of

Are you using cake mixes or scratch recipes? That definitely makes a difference in the amounts given on the chart. With pans that thick, I would use the insulating strips around the pans while baking for that long, or you will have some huge peaks of cake baked in the center and waste your batter.
I would try your 8" pan first, see how that measures up to the chart when baked, and go from there. In my experience, when I bake in 3" high pans, they don't always reach the full 3 inches after cooling. I make full 2" high cakes and layer them according to how tall I want the tier. HTH icon_smile.gif

buggus Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 2:43pm
post #9 of

I'm making mine from scratch.

I don't have a choice in pans at the moment, as I borrowed the ones I have as I won't have time to go and purchase 2 inch pans before Friday. The supply shop I go to is on the other side of the City (about an hour away).

Rylan Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 2:51pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by buggus

I'm resurrecting this post, as I need to know myself how much batter to use for my cakes. I making an 8, 10 and 14 inch cake this weekend, and the pans are all 3 inches deep. I've decided to make the tiers 6 inches high, so I'll have to double up the cakes. I've looked at this link: http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-3-inch-pans.cfm and I'm confused..does it really take 19 cups of batter for a 14 inch cake??




Again, like already mentioned, it depends what recipe you use.

sweetiesbykim Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 3:16pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by buggus

I'm making mine from scratch.

I don't have a choice in pans at the moment, as I borrowed the ones I have as I won't have time to go and purchase 2 inch pans before Friday. The supply shop I go to is on the other side of the City (about an hour away).




I have some 3 inch pans in my collection, but I just make a 2" layer. I would still try the 8" pan first, recording how much batter it takes and how high it bakes, and go from there.

Some recipes state they make 2-9" layers(usually 1-1 1/2" baked layers). I usually bake 2-8" cakes to get a little more height(again, depending on the recipe). And for the same recipe X1 usually bakes one 10" round.

I write down on each recipe how much batter it made(in cups or weight), what size and shape pan used, the baked height, and how many layers. That has REALLY helped me with the figuring!

sadsmile Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 3:30pm

It also depends on how high the recipe bakes up and how tall you need your layers. I like to have as close to two inch layers as I can get and I use two inch pans. I collar the pans so I can use more batter to ensure a tall layer even after leveling it. I fill my pans up to 1/4 inch from the top of the rim which you can still see through the parchment collar. That way after leveling and setteling my cakes are almost perfect two inch layers that I can fill stack up or torte and fill and stack, depending on the cake.

I always over fill(collared) but I always get the height I want.
I use 6" pan-2 1/2 cups batter
8" pan-5 cups batter
10"pan- 8 cups batter

AnythingBaked Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 3:48pm

If you are asking how much cake batter for different size cake pans then it truly depends on the recipe that you are using. The best suggestion is to experiment from the largest pan first and then work backwards. You will notice that the largest pan will not rise as much as the smaller pans (e.g 6") especially if you start going into dimensions like 14, 16, and 18" pans. One suggestion to keep your cakes level and even is to consistently use the Magic Cake Strips to ensure that you get a flat surface on your cakes. If you use these then there will be minimal waste and even texture to your cakes.

Thanks
AB

schoolbaker Posted 19 Feb 2013 , 11:57pm

I love Wilton round cake pans....and their batter measurements are perfect...whether I use a box mix or scratch mix....my problem is...I don't want to torte a cake, but I want to make my cakes just a wee bit smaller in height, so thinking about using two cups less batter per pan and hopefully I will still get the 1-in in height and not two inches that I normally get...for a 10-in round pan, it calls for 6 cups of batter, I am hoping 4 cup of batter will be fine...has anyone tried this for a 1-in high layer??

CakeMommy0125 Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 3:58am

A

Original message sent by schoolbaker

I love Wilton round cake pans....and their batter measurements are perfect...whether I use a box mix or scratch mix....my problem is...I don't want to torte a cake, but I want to make my cakes just a wee bit smaller in height, so thinking about using two cups less batter per pan and hopefully I will still get the 1-in in height and not two inches that I normally get...for a 10-in round pan, it calls for 6 cups of batter, I am hoping 4 cup of batter will be fine...has anyone tried this for a 1-in high layer??

Yes, I actually tried this tonight and it works perfectly! It doesn't really depend TOO much on the recipe you use, BUT if you can notice a difference in the thickness of a particular batter, I would do ab 1&1/2 cups less instead of two, just because it tends to rise a little less...does that's make any sense? Lol I don't know if I'm saying it the right way.. Example: When I use a cake mix: The Betty Crocker triple choc fudge calls for oil, so it's thin and tends to rise a lot, so in a 10 in pan I use 4 cups of batter instead of six. However, the Pillsbury Golden Butter Recipe(yummmmmm) calls for butter so it's super thick, (you actually have to spread it in the pan instead of it just dispersing by so I use 4&3/4 cups of mix instead of the normal 6 cups for a 10 in pan.....hope this helps! Good luck!

mrbakery Posted 8 Oct 2013 , 12:15pm

I would agree that wilton's measurements are fairly accurate, but (and it could just be the climate I live in) I don't get a full 2" layer in the end.  They tend to be about 1.5"=1.75" by the time I trim the dome off so I have increased, slightly, some of the batter amounts so that when I trim the dome off the top, I have a 2" layer left.

 

Also, if you ever want an idea on how much batter to put in the pan, just take a measuring cup and fill the pan with water, keeping track of how much water you put in it.  I've been going through my pans and making a chart for 1/2 full & 2/3 full, so, depending on how big I want the layer or how much rise I think I'll get out of a particular recipe, I know exactly how much batter to put it.  It helps with calculating the correct amount of batter to make and for calculating cost.

ddaigle Posted 8 Oct 2013 , 12:37pm

For me, none of the charts are accurate because the WASC is more dense.    I have my own chart with all of the combinations I bake so I know.   Some combinations I have memorized...for instance, a double batch WASC will give me 2 - 10" pans and 1-6".   I fill 2/3 and have a good hump so when I trim off the top...I have a 2" cake.

mrbakery Posted 9 Oct 2013 , 3:45am

Today I did the math to figure out the full volume capacity of cake round and square cake pans.  I posted it on my blog here: 

http://mandrbakery.com/blog

I also broke down how much you need for 1/2 full and 2/3 full.  This should help give you a better idea of what you need.

Obabinrin Posted 28 Oct 2013 , 9:54am

AHi, pls i'd love it if you could tell me the measurement in grams. I dnt have this measuring cup. Thanks.

crnewbold Posted 28 Oct 2013 , 3:54pm

Thank you mrbakery!!!!  Just read your blog post.  That information satisfies my inner scientist.  You really can't argue with math.

SweetDelights1 Posted 2 May 2014 , 10:33pm

I am making a cake recipe from scratch that makes 4 cups of batter.  I will be using a 12" round cake pan, so to get a 2inch height will I need 8 cups of batter or will 4 be enough??

 

I am using the pan for the first time. Thank you for your help.... :D

MBalaska Posted 2 May 2014 , 10:53pm
SweetDelights1 Posted 2 May 2014 , 11:10pm

Amazing!!! Thank you!  :)

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