Does Anyone Dip Your Cake Balls(Cake Truffles) In Real Choc?

Decorating By EatSomeCake Updated 13 Jul 2009 , 3:23am by underthesun

EatSomeCake Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 11:37pm
post #1 of 22

I was just wondering if anyone does this. I haven't dipped them in the candy coating, I've been using Ghirardelli's choc chips(they have bittersweet, semi-sweet, milk, and white) They advertise its uses for baking and dipping fruits, etc.(it doesn't need to be tempered and hardens quickly once placed in the fridge or when contacting frozen cake ball) The cake balls taste excellent with the Ghirardelli choc and I have had no issues with the dipping the balls in dark choc and milk choc. The white choc always gives me problems though. It starts to turn very thick and globby and it's nearly imossible to dip and doesn't give a nice appearance afterward. I wonder if anyone could give me some pointers for what I'm doing wrong. I like to use premium ingredients because exceptional tatse is important to me so I'd like to stick with real chocolates but am thinking I might keep using the milk and dark chocolates and for any white choc requirements I may end up having to use the candy coatings. Thanks for any tips anyone can give!

21 replies
narfletta Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 11:53pm
post #2 of 22

Oh, I just made cake balls for the first time today, and had the same prob with white chocolate chips (i just used hershey's b/c it's what i had here).. i ended up putting them in a small saucepan on stove and mixing with some skim milk (what i had).. i stirred over low heat until all the way melted. then it was still VERY thick compared to the semisweet choc i had melted--- but it looked pretty when i spooned it over the cake balls. i test tasted one and it was good. i wonder if anyone has any other tips??? it was such a thick consistency that i am not thrilled to try it again. .... sorry this probably doesn't help much. icon_sad.gif

EatSomeCake Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:03am
post #3 of 22

Narfletta-

No, don't ever add liquid of any kind to real c hocolate whether milk, dark or white. You can't add it to candy coatings(fake choc) either. In both it causes the chocolate to seize and makes it even more difficult to work with and is unusable. Just a heads up for next time! Aren't the cake balls yummy?

nicolesprinkle Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:15am
post #4 of 22

I have the same issue with white chocolate! My tends to start crumbling. Maybe a double boiler would work better than the microwave. Can you add crisco to help make it smoother?

nicolesprinkle Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:16am
post #5 of 22

I have the same issue with white chocolate! My tends to start crumbling. Maybe a double boiler would work better than the microwave. Can you add crisco to help make it smoother?

nicolesprinkle Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:16am
post #6 of 22

Sorry for the double post! My computer went nuts! icon_confused.gif

EatSomeCake Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:27am
post #7 of 22

yeah, I have added a tblsp of crisco to 2 packages melted white choc and that works for about 5 minutes and then it gets stiff and unmanageable again. When that happens I add more crisco (another tblsp) and then it gets too runny(but good for dipping) but then when I set it down to harden on parchment it looks ok but has strange lumps of white chocolate all over in about the size of a half a dime and what's not a chunk of choc is so thin you can see the cake ball through it ....weird! White choc is still the only choc I have trouble with and I just want my cake balls to look nice!!!!
icon_sad.gif Help us someone! Please.... icon_smile.gif

rvercher23 Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:27am
post #8 of 22

I dont know if this works for anyone else, but when I am using any kind of chocolate for dipping, I always add a tablespoon of shortening or butter. It helps it to melt smoothly and gives it a nice sheen. After I dip my ingredients, I lay them out on wax paper and let them set up. HTH

tyty Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:31am
post #9 of 22

I like to use the Ghiradelli dipping chocolate, it comes in a large box (maybe the size of a sheet of paper). I've used the dark chocolate only, never tried the white chocolate, but this may work better for you. It also tates much better than candy melts or other dipping chocolates. I get it from the warehouse store but you can buy it directly from their website.

I have also used Guittard dipping/melting chocolate, the taste was good but it made large puddles under the balls.

Charmed Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:35am
post #10 of 22

Chocolate chips are not a good choice for covering or dipping because they are made in a way to keep their shape while baking. I have heard that you can add a tblsp of shortening to smooth it.

narfletta Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:40am
post #11 of 22

haha.. you guys are so helpful!!!! i can't wait till next time i try making these... although at least they are sooo tasty! (i did warm the milk up hoping it wouldn't seize so much... instead it just got really thick!! icon_smile.gif i was making them with my 5 year old and he was like "mom, i think something's wrong with this chocolate, i'll use the other one" i'm just glad i'm not the only one having issues with the white choc!!!!

EatSomeCake Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:42am
post #12 of 22

Thanks to evryone responded and I'd love to hear from anyone else with experience on white choc chips for dipping
icon_smile.gif

varika Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 12:50am
post #13 of 22

I haven't particularly used it for dipping, but I've had problems with white chocolate melts not melting properly. I've found that adding a handful of paramount crystals helps significantly.

I had to try THREE TIMES to get a plan flat pool of white chocolate for my chocolate tortilla chips last week. So you're not alone in it giving you trouble!

booklady Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 1:05am
post #14 of 22

Try adding parmount crystals to white chocolate. Thins the chocolate and works well with cake balls. I purchase them at the local cake and candy store.

EatSomeCake Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 1:06am
post #15 of 22

Thanks you guys, I will try the paramount chips!

underthesun Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 2:12am
post #16 of 22

White chocolate (not really chocolate at all) will burn very quickly and at a lower temperature than dark or milk chocolate. This is what causes the thick gumminess. Two suggestions: chop your white choc. chips into finer pieces. This will help melt the chips quicker, before they have a chance to burn. If you are microwaving be sure to only zap 15 seconds at a time and using a spatula, stirring for several minutes helping the melting process. Or better yet, use a white chocolate bar (Lindt white chocolate is a good choice) instead of chocolate chips. It'll melt quicker than the chips which are made to hold together. Good luck!

EatSomeCake Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 2:21am
post #17 of 22

Thank you so much UnderTheSun! All of the info you gave is so useful. Thank you!!!!!

LKing12 Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 2:30am
post #18 of 22

White chocolate does not have enough butter fat to melt like regular chocolate. That is why you never see a chocolate fountain with white chocolate. It isn't technically "chocolate"...

underthesun Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 11:18am
post #19 of 22

Actually cocoa butter is what makes the difference between white melting candy and white chocolate. I know this is more info than anyone ever really wanted, but the government requires a minimum of 20% cocoa butter in order to be labeled white chocolate. The higher the percentage of cocoa butter, the better the white chocolate. If you're looking for real white chocolate, check out the percentage of cocoa butter. Here is a site about Guittard white chocolate discs and how they melt. If you can find them, they are great. However, as I wrote earlier, chopping your chips to get an easier melt should work, also.

http://bakingbites.com/2009/06/guittard-white-chocolate-wafers-reviewed/

EatSomeCake Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 11:55am
post #20 of 22

Thanks UnderTheSun! I will definitely see if I can get my hands on Guittard! I'm so glad i posted, you've all been very helpful.

cakelovincrazy Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 1:57am
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by underthesun

Actually cocoa butter is what makes the difference between white melting candy and white chocolate. I know this is more info than anyone ever really wanted, but the government requires a minimum of 20% cocoa butter in order to be labeled white chocolate. The higher the percentage of cocoa butter, the better the white chocolate. If you're looking for real white chocolate, check out the percentage of cocoa butter. Here is a site about Guittard white chocolate discs and how they melt. If you can find them, they are great. However, as I wrote earlier, chopping your chips to get an easier melt should work, also.

http://bakingbites.com/2009/06/guittard-white-chocolate-wafers-reviewed/




Do you know if the brand Bakers White Chocolate would work okay to pour over cake balls? My daughter has a peanut allergy and this is the only brand that is peanut safe.
Any pointers for using this type of chocolate with cake balls? I was told to use an apricot glaze or simple syrup first. Any other suggestions?

underthesun Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 3:23am
post #22 of 22

cakelovincrazy: I read something recently about the white bakers chocolate. Can't find it now, but I know the site was talking about it melting better than chips, since chips are made to hold together. Just make sure you chop it up fine so it melts easier. If I find the site, I'll post it.

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