Help Please, Elephant Skin And Bulging?

Decorating By thecarouselcloset Updated 14 Jul 2009 , 7:11pm by klallen21

thecarouselcloset Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 4:33pm
post #1 of 26

Hi I'm new here and to cake decorating as well, I have done a few cakes but I need help. I can't get a clean finish when I cover in fondant. I dont know if I'm using too much buttercream or not enough. Also I get the elephant skin effect on my cakes. I make my own buttercream but use wilton fondant. Does everyone here make their own?

I know there is tons of info on this site which is overwhelming, can anyone point me in the right direction please??

Thank you!
Here are a few of the cakes that i've done so you can see what i'm talking about.
LL
LL

25 replies
kitty122000 Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 4:48pm
post #2 of 26

your cakes look really good! I had a problem with buldging and for me it was because I had way too much buttercream instead of just a crumb coat. I'ver had to peel off the fondant and scrape off the buttercream and roll out all new fondant.

for some people though they are able to put a lot of frosting and wait for it to stiffen and then put the fondant on with no problem. I think it comes with practice

as for the elephant skin, I'm not sure, I've made my own Marshmallow fondant, and most recently tries Satin Ice. both are very easy to work with and I havent had any problems. are you kneading the fondant with crisco? that might help.

Renaejrk Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 4:51pm
post #3 of 26

sometimes when fondant gets kind of dry you get that elephant skin effect - I would use something other than Wilton, though, it tastes like chemicals and is disgusting. There are several other good pre-made fondants, and some good recipes for homemade fondant also!

missyd4e Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 4:54pm
post #4 of 26

2 things'
1) I have found that Satin Ice holds up much better than other fondants
2) Try the silicone mats when rolling your fondant, the side that is to your fondant should be the side up on your cakes. The silicone keeps the fondant from being exposed to the air, thus eliminating elephant skin.
Just a thought.

cakenutz Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 4:56pm
post #5 of 26

Just by looking I'd say to much buttercream. You only need a thin crumb coat. Let it harden for about 15 min or so in fridge. Use a viva paper towel lay it on cake and smooth icing Theres a thread on here called the Melvira method telling how to do it. Roll fondant no thicker than 1/4 inch I like a little thinner and smooth. If you are bulging between layers you are using to much filling. be sure you make a dam around edge before filling. HTH debbie

cakenutz Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 4:58pm
post #6 of 26

Just by looking I'd say to much buttercream. You only need a thin crumb coat. Let it harden for about 15 min or so in fridge. Use a viva paper towel lay it on cake and smooth icing Theres a thread on here called the Melvira method telling how to do it. Roll fondant no thicker than 1/4 inch I like a little thinner and smooth. If you are bulging between layers you are using to much filling. be sure you make a dam around edge before filling. HTH debbie

tonedna Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 5:14pm
post #7 of 26

I will say you have too much buttercream. I dont love the taste of wiltons fondant. I use Satin Ice. As for preventing the buttercream to shift while you put the fondant,
refrigerate the cake until it hardens so the weight of the fondant doesnt affect the shape of the cake.
Edna icon_smile.gif

thecarouselcloset Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 6:45pm
post #8 of 26

Well I know I use alot of buttercream because my cakes come out different sizes so I try to use frosting to even them out. Does everyone cut them to make them even?

Renaejrk Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 7:42pm
post #9 of 26

You can also roll your fondant out on a clear sheet of vinyl, then turn it over and lay it on the cake, then peel off - it works wonderfully, and you can use a permanent marker on the side where the fondant won't touch and write measurements if you need to!

kitty122000 Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 7:49pm
post #10 of 26

I cut mine to even them out

thecarouselcloset Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 7:56pm
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty122000

I cut mine to even them out


i tried to cut mine, I guess I just need practice?

thecarouselcloset Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 7:59pm
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty122000

I cut mine to even them out


i tried to cut mine, I guess I just need practice?

UpAt2am Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 8:00pm
post #13 of 26

the cakes look great! i suggest going to youtube to see how to make your own marshmellow fondant. to get your cakes even use "bake even strips." you can get them at michaels...they are amazing and you dont waste any cake like you would if you cut them to level them out. they also eliminate the sides from cooking too fast (no crispy edges!) good luck!

thecarouselcloset Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 8:18pm
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty122000

I cut mine to even them out


i tried to cut mine, I guess I just need practice?

thecarouselcloset Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 8:40pm
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty122000

I cut mine to even them out


i tried to cut mine, I guess I just need practice?

thecarouselcloset Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 9:02pm
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty122000

I cut mine to even them out


i tried to cut mine, I guess I just need practice?

thecarouselcloset Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 9:03pm
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty122000

I cut mine to even them out


i tried to cut mine, I guess I just need practice?

thecarouselcloset Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 9:04pm
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty122000

I cut mine to even them out


i tried to cut mine, I guess I just need practice?

Rylan Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 2:09am
post #19 of 26

Also, try considering ganache under fondant. It works perfectly.

kimmyboo925 Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 2:37am
post #20 of 26

The Cakes are beautiful. I have that bulging problem when it is too hot... the cake gets bubbles under the fondant. I usually take a pin and pop the bubble and try to smooth it back out if the fondant isnt too googy. I never had the elephant skin with wilton, but I do get it with Satin Ice... I think everyone has there own perfected method using thier perfered fondant. Everyone hates wiltons taste, but I dont. I do like the Satin Ice better though.

thecarouselcloset Posted 12 Jul 2009 , 5:04am
post #21 of 26

Sorry for all of the reposts guys, my iphone is acting silly.

I have never heard of satin ice, where could I get it at?

thecarouselcloset Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 11:05pm
post #22 of 26

Also could someone share the best ganache recipe, these were just my second and third cakes so i have alot to learn.

mkm25 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 6:02pm
post #23 of 26

I just recently bought some cake supplies from fondantsource.com and they were VERY fast with getting it in the mail to me! I know they sell Satin Ice, but they're not the only ones.

disubu Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 6:25pm
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

I will say you have too much buttercream. I dont love the taste of wiltons fondant. I use . As for preventing the buttercream to shift while you put the fondant,
refrigerate the cake until it hardens so the weight of the fondant doesnt affect the shape of the cake.
Edna icon_smile.gif




I have had problems with bulging too. Sometimes my fondant looks great and sometimes it doesn't. I can't figure it out!! I HAVE tried putting a dam...I HAVE tried using thin buttercream (although I have noticed on cake shows that most of the professionals put a thick enough buttercream layer to hide the cake entirely--even if they are calling it a crumb coat...I HAVE tried putting the cake in the fridge.

I think cakes with fondant taste better when they have a thicker layer of filling; otherwise, guests who do not like fondant end up eating plain cake with no icing.

tonedna,
When I let my cakes set up in the fridge before covering with fondant, I sometimes end up with little bubbles from trapped air as the cake comes to room temp.

This one has me stumped!! I have been trying to figure out why I have this problem sometimes, and sometimes I do not. I know many professionals use moisture controlled refrigerators.

bakesuzy Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 6:55pm
post #25 of 26

I am not expert at this as i have only been doing it for four months now and taught myself thus far, but i used to have the bulging thing going on too, so i googled and found some tips:

You need a level cake, if you dont want to cut your cake level bake it level by pressing on the cake slightly to flatten it the second it comes out of the oven(this sounds rediculous - i know, but it works like a charm),use a paper towel or something so you dont burn your hand. this has to be done in the first 10 seconds after the cake comes out of the oven. press it as level/flat as you can. Also when you start decorating it(if you are not already doing it) flip the cake so the top part of both layers is pointing down and the bottom of the cakes is on top/pointing up, this way it is even more level.

I used to have the bulging because i put too much icing in between the layers because the cakes wasnt flat and i plastered it to get everything looking good but if your cakes is level you dont need so much icing inbetween the layers. Because the second the fondant is placed over the cake and even though you tried to level it out with icing the cakes slide off and causes the bulging or the fondant just presses the excess icing out...


i hope this helps...with the bulging at least

klallen21 Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 7:11pm
post #26 of 26

I've had the bulging problem....the sugarshack lady has a small clip from her fondant dvd on her website

http://sugaredproductions.com/Fondant_DVD.html

It had some helpful info on this topic.

I haven't seen the whole DVD, just the clip....after watching the clips I want ALL of her dvds icon_smile.gif

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