Sharpened Wooden Dowel Through Whole Cake???

Decorating By The_Sugar_Fairy Updated 19 Jul 2009 , 2:55am by leah_s

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 12:51am
post #1 of 14

Hey all! I just don't understand the sharpened wooden dowel through the entire cake thing. I've obviously never tried it, but I can't imagine that the dowel would easily go through the cake boards of each tier without squishing everything. Can someone shed light on this for me?

13 replies
2SchnauzerLady Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 1:07am
post #2 of 14

I learned it in the Wilton 3 course. We sharpened the dowel with a pencil sharpner dedicated to cakes, and then tapped it easily through the cardboard cake circles with a tack hammer. My cake was on a foam core board, and I was able to tap it into that, also. So I had the dowel running through my tiers and my cake tiers did not slide at all with taking the cake in and out of the car to home, and then to work the next morning.

sweetcravings Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 1:11am
post #3 of 14

Yup, as the above poster said. Sharpen your dowel with a pencil sharpner then just hammer it down into the cake. you'd be surprized how easily it goes through the boards.

varika Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 1:14am
post #4 of 14

If'n you don't believe it, just try it. Do a small tiered cake, like a 6" and 4" rounds, sharpen a dowel, and shove it in with a good twist.

It's like hammering a nail or, if you twist it, using a drill. The nail had a point, and that's what makes it go through the wood neatly. If you just have a flat peg, whichever is softer material--the peg or the wood--gets all smashed up, but that point lets it go through smoothly.

Another analogy would be a sewing needle. You can't poke your finger through your shirt without making a big problem, but a needle goes in cleanly and out the other side without ever disturbing a thing.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 1:15am
post #5 of 14

So how thick does the dowel have to be? Does it have to be a special cake dowel sharpener then? Didn't understand the cake boards that you used, are they just the regular ones Wilton sells? Covered in facifoil wrap or no? Thanks!

Rylan Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 1:43am
post #6 of 14

I use those cardboard circles and cover it in plastic wrap. It usually has a white top and a brown bottom. The dowel depends on how thick you want it. Some people use sharpeneners to sharpen it, I use a serrated knife.

JaimeAnn Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 1:55am
post #7 of 14

I have a dedicated exacto brand pencil sharpener (the kind with the handle you turn) They were at the dollar store so I bought 3. 1 for cake dowels 1 for everyday pencils and 1 for art colored pencils .

I use foamcore and cut my own cake circles the sharpened dowels go in easily. I usually use 2 bamboo skewers for a 2 tier cake if it is much taller i use 1/4" dowels cut to length.
I clean them well with Vodka.

Karenreg Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 2:00am
post #8 of 14

Wat do you use to trim the excess end of the dowell? I tried sawing it with a knife but that's kinda tedious.Is there another alternative?

JaimeAnn Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 3:06am
post #9 of 14

I use a pvc pipe cutter or a garden pruner .. I have one of each in my cake kit that have only been used for cake stuff ...
LL
LL

Karenreg Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 5:18am
post #10 of 14

Tx JaimeAnn for having shared images as well.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 12:58am
post #11 of 14

Thanks so much for the pics of the garden pruners. I bought a pair today and they work great! I did put the wooden dowel through the entire cake and it worked out wonderfully!! I'm so happy... but now I'm curious, when the cake is served, do they need to pull out the dowel and then remove each tier or just cut each tier while the cake is all together?? Also, the icing pulled right off each tier when I took it apart, it stuck to the cake board from the tier above. Any ideas on how to fix this? Thanks all so much for the advice.

indydebi Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 1:30am
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

... but now I'm curious, when the cake is served, do they need to pull out the dowel and then remove each tier or just cut each tier while the cake is all together?? Also, the icing pulled right off each tier when I took it apart, it stuck to the cake board from the tier above. Any ideas on how to fix this? Thanks all so much for the advice.




When I serve a cake that is doweled, I lift the top tier off (lift it up over and off of the dowel), then pull the dowel out. I disassemble the cake to cut it. I always cut the largest tier first because *IF* there is any cake left over, it's easier to store the smaller uncut tiers than it is to store a partially cut large tier.

Icing sticks because wet icing comes in contact with the cardboard. I always let my icing crust before assembling the cake and I don't ever have this problem. (I cut and serve most of my cakes so I see it first hand.)

ALternate ideas are to place wax or parchment paper circles under the cardboard, sprinkle the top of the lower cake with p.sugar.

Some sprinkle coconut under the cardboard, but I always warn bakers to check with the client first. I hate coconut with a passion and some folks are allergic.

Ironically, I had a lady in the shop just this week who told me that she got a cake where the baker put coconut between the layers and didn't tell this customer. Customer ended up in the hospital due to an allergy. Customer sent the baker the medical bill, which the baker paid.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 1:44am
post #13 of 14

Oh my Gosh Indydebi, thank you so much for all your excellent advice. You're awesome! I love your Dream Buttercream icing by the way!!

leah_s Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 2:55am
post #14 of 14

Or, you can just uses SPS and avoid dowels altogether. And have a wonderfully secure cake.

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