Does Anyone Make Their Own Cookie Cutters?

Baking By imamommy1205 Updated 17 Jul 2009 , 10:44am by TracyLH

imamommy1205 Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 5:13pm
post #1 of 16

I found a tutorial on making them, but I am having trouble finding metal ribbon. I looked up aluminum flashing, but the smallest width they make it is 6" and I need it to be more like 1 inch wide so I dont have to cut it. Any ideas? I have only looked at Lowes and Home Depot online, so I will have to look in the store in case it is called something other than what I have been typing in (I put in metal ribbon, copper ribbon, and aluminum flashing like my dad said). Thanks for any help!!

15 replies
donkeemom Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 5:22pm
post #2 of 16

Maybe try ebay. You can find all sorts of unusual things there. icon_cool.gif

MichelleM77 Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 5:53pm
post #3 of 16

There is a kit you can buy that comes with the metal and some bendy tools, or you can just buy the refill kit of metal strips. I've only made a few myself and try to avoid it at all costs! icon_smile.gif

http://cookiecutter.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=439

http://www.foosecookiecutters.com/store/cutterkits/index.html

bonniebakes Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 8:48pm
post #4 of 16

I've used the kit - it wasn't too bad, but not my first choice (I had a hard time with the shape). If you don't have to do a whole lot of one shape at one time, you can try making a template. Here's a link to info about templates/cutters....

KHalsteads article make your own cutters
http://cakecentral.com/article73-How-To-Make-Your-Own-Cookie-Cutters.html

making own cutters thread
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-607066-metal.html

mkm25 Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 8:52pm
post #5 of 16

I make my own cookie cutters and gum paste cutters all the time. I bought a roll of aluminum flashing from Lowe's and I just cut it in 1-inch strips. It only adds a little bit of time to the whole process so I don't really think it's a big deal. If you do decide to cut your own, invest in some metal cutters and gloves (I just bought gardening gloves). The flashing can easily cut you if you slide your hand along the side. I've never been cut by one of my cutters once it was shaped, only while making the shape.

cutthecake Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 8:57pm
post #6 of 16

I found instructions somewhere--maybe here on CC-- for making cookie cutters from heavy-duty aluminum roasting pans. I made a couple of cutters from those directions. They're okay for occasional use, but I don't think they will hold up to frequent and repeated use. Mine are kind of flimsy, but they were easy enough to make.
I just googled "how to make cookie cutters from aluminum pans", and I found the instructions. I don't know how to attach a link. Sorry.

varika Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 9:03pm
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by imamommy1205

I found a tutorial on making them, but I am having trouble finding metal ribbon. I looked up aluminum flashing, but the smallest width they make it is 6" and I need it to be more like 1 inch wide so I dont have to cut it. Any ideas? I have only looked at Lowes and Home Depot online, so I will have to look in the store in case it is called something other than what I have been typing in (I put in metal ribbon, copper ribbon, and aluminum flashing like my dad said). Thanks for any help!!




http://www.basiccopper.com/cocuco.html <--This site has strips just for cookie cutters, it says.

cutthecake Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 9:11pm
post #8 of 16

Those copper strips look great--but expensive. I found it very difficult to bend the aluminum strips into the exact shape I wanted, and I wasted a lot of the material, which was from cheap roasting pans. I suggest that you experiment with aluminum pans before you use the copper strips. I found that details were difficult to achieve, so I made simple cutters.

mkm25 Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 9:41pm
post #9 of 16

Yes, small details are difficult to achieve. I use plyers to help bend the aluminum into sharp turns and points, but there are some gum paste cutters I would never attempt - too many turns!

You need to get aluminum flashing that is thin enough that it's pliable, but thick enough that your cutter is sturdy. Old pans seem thick...how do you shape them? I'm sorry, but I can't remember what size I got. I asked an employee at Lowe's to help me - maybe (only maybe...I know how those stores can be) you can find someone to help you too.

rhondab Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 12:58pm
post #10 of 16

If you're not planning on making a lot of cutters, another workable option is to reshape another cutter into the shape you need. Find something that is similar and just go at it with some pliers.

rhondab Posted 11 Jul 2009 , 12:59pm
post #11 of 16

If you're not planning on making a lot of cutters, another workable option is to reshape another cutter into the shape you need. Find something that is similar and just go at it with some pliers.

CookieMeister Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 4:09pm
post #12 of 16

My husband has made a few cookie cutters for me - he got the aluminum flashing at Home Depot. It's with the roofing supplies.

TracyLH Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 11:34am
post #13 of 16

I make my own cutters all the time after doing a lot of research on the best metal to use. Everyone can use what they choose and I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but I did extensive research on supplies at Home Depot/Lowes and called the manufacturers of the aluminum flashing themselves and they said hands-down do not use it for cookie cutters. The metal is produced with toxic oils and you can wash and wash it, but it still should never be used for food. They were adamant about that. KHalstead used aluminum flashing, but the type she bought many years ago that was fine is no longer made without the toxic oils. It is on her tutorial (which is excellent, by the way).

I used 26 guage food safe stainless steel cut into 1" ribbons that I get from Joe at Speedy Metals(866-938-6061). Much better price than copper, is sturdy and will not rust. I have been very happy with it.

Here is a link to the posting I did about it:
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-607066-metal.html

Alagoas Posted 16 Jul 2009 , 7:11pm
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracyLH

I make my own cutters all the time after doing a lot of research on the best metal to use. Everyone can use what they choose and I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but I did extensive research on supplies at Home Depot/Lowes and called the manufacturers of the aluminum flashing themselves and they said hands-down do not use it for cookie cutters. The metal is produced with toxic oils and you can wash and wash it, but it still should never be used for food. They were adamant about that. KHalstead used aluminum flashing, but the type she bought many years ago that was fine is no longer made without the toxic oils. It is on her tutorial (which is excellent, by the way).

I used 26 guage food safe stainless steel cut into 1" ribbons that I get from Joe at Speedy Metals(866-938-6061). Much better price than copper, is sturdy and will not rust. I have been very happy with it.

Here is a link to the posting I did about it:
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-607066-metal.html


Hi Tracy! Is that stainless steel ribbon easy to shape... I use one that is very hard for me to bend, they end up really nice but it takes a lot of time to finish the shape...

TracyLH Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 10:41am
post #15 of 16

I wouldn't say it is overly easy, but I need it that strong to keep its shape. I tried lighter metal and it just didn't hold up. Needlenose pliers are the key. I have been able to do some intricate shapes (my witch for example) and am pleased with it, but no, it is not overly easy. I think it is well worth it though.

TracyLH Posted 17 Jul 2009 , 10:44am
post #16 of 16

I wouldn't say it is overly easy, but I need it that strong to keep its shape. I tried lighter metal and it just didn't hold up. Needlenose pliers are the key. I have been able to do some intricate shapes (my witch for example) and am pleased with it, but no, it is not overly easy. I think it is well worth it though, but that is just my thought.

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