First Wedding, 2 Questions About Stacking.

Decorating By kikster Updated 13 Jul 2009 , 3:37pm by indydebi

kikster Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 2:05pm
post #1 of 10

I have my first wedding on Aug 22nd, and I am SUPER nervous. Anyway, I have 2 questions for you more experienced ladies. If I have access to the venue in enough time to assemble the cake onsite, will it be ok to stack the cakes without using the super long sharpened dowel to go from the top tier all the way to the bottom? I only really need that if I am transporting the cake assembled correct?

My other question is about the cake seperators. Up until now, I have just used cardboard underneath each stacked tier, with ample dowel support. I am just wondering if the whole structure would be more stable if I used plastic cake seperator plates with wooden dowels, as opposed to the cardboard.

Any advice or past experience would be appreciated.

9 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 2:14pm
post #2 of 10

I always use foamcore, cut to size with a box cutter, because I want the cake circle to be the exact size of the tier.

I like the plastic dowels though, they're easier to cut than wooden and much more stable.

You don't need a center dowel if you're assembling it at the venue.

I just made my first wedding cake last week, and it had to travel 50 miles out into the country and up into the hills so I was really worried about it sliding around. I used non-slip drawer liners inside the boxes so that the cake wouldn't slide, and I used moving boxes cut in half rather than cake boxes because the cake boxes I've seen are pretty flimsy. I was transporting it in a little station wagon, and not all of it fit in the back. For the cake that I put on the back seat, I rolled up a towel and put it under the box to make the seat level. I also buckled the box in with the seat belt. We had to go up some hills so steep that we had to put the car in 1st gear and just chug our way up the hill...but when we got there, the cake hadn't moved an inch icon_biggrin.gif

kikster Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 2:36pm
post #3 of 10

Just curious, what do you cut the plastic dowels with?

mcdonald Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 2:47pm
post #4 of 10

I would say to stay with what works for you !! That is what I have learned. I use cardboard circles and bubble tea straws all the time and went to go change it up because I was nervous....

Texas_Rose Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 2:51pm
post #5 of 10

I cut the plastic dowels with a serrated knife...just a regular steak knife. You can also cut them with kitchen shears but they don't get as flat all the way around that way. They're hollow, look like giant drinking straws. They seem more stable than wooden dowels because they're bigger around...kind of like the way a shoe with a stacked heel is more stable than a stiletto icon_biggrin.gif

mcdonald Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 2:53pm
post #6 of 10

I guess I could have finished my post!!!

I just keep with my cardboard circles and by bubble tea straws. I have stacked a 4 tier cake that way and I have had zero problems. But that is just me... everyone here has their own preference.. there are lots of ways to do it... it is just what you are comfortable with..

thecakeplace2 Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 2:24pm
post #7 of 10

I always put cardboard between the layers (if stacked) and use regular drinking straws for the dowels, have done this for up to a 5 tier cake, stacked or pillared. I like that they are hollow and when pushed in cake goes up inside them. After using wooden dowels once and having them rip the cake up, I have used straws for over 10 years, I owned my own business and sometimes did 4 or 5 weddings a weekend, this method has never failed me. I push them into the cake, pull back up and cut where the top edge of the icing has stuck to it with a pair of scissors. I have delivered cakes up to 3 tiers stacked, depending on size of tiers and how heavy cake is. I put the staws in each layer after is has been iced.

thecakeplace2 Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 2:26pm
post #8 of 10

I always put cardboard between the layers (if stacked) and use regular drinking straws for the dowels, have done this for up to a 5 tier cake, stacked or pillared. I like that they are hollow and when pushed in cake goes up inside them. After using wooden dowels once and having them rip the cake up, I have used straws for over 10 years, I owned my own business and sometimes did 4 or 5 weddings a weekend, this method has never failed me. I push them into the cake, pull back up and cut where the top edge of the icing has stuck to it with a pair of scissors. I have delivered cakes up to 3 tiers stacked, depending on size of tiers and how heavy cake is. I put the staws in each layer after is has been iced.

hamie Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 2:34pm
post #9 of 10

I use leahs sps system, never any worries.

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-603925.html

hamie

indydebi Posted 13 Jul 2009 , 3:37pm
post #10 of 10

If you're assembling on site, then you dont' need the center dowel.

The cardboards alone are fine for supporting the cake. That's all I use. I USED to always put plastic plates between the tiers, then I started getting more orders for D&R cakes (Drop-n-Run) and I didn't want to screw around with returning or charging or plates. I've done 5 tier cakes with just one cardboard under each tier and they hold up just fine.

If you have time to order it, I'd also suggest the SPS system.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%