When A Kitchen Cake Doesn't Stay In The Kitchen...

Decorating By PennySue Updated 9 Jul 2009 , 4:13am by PennySue

PennySue Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 11:39pm
post #1 of 10

I'm baking for a wedding this weekend. 4 tiers and a 1/3 sheet kitchen cake. I'll also be serving. Here is my question...if the kitchen cake is served from the cake table, should it be decorated the same as the actual wedding cake? I wasn't planning on covering it with fondant like the wc, just iced. What do you think??

9 replies
vtcake Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 11:47pm
post #2 of 10

I'd be insulted if it was obvious that I didn't receive a piece of the 'real' cake, unless it was a different flavor that was part of a choice for guests.

__Jamie__ Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 11:50pm
post #3 of 10

Same here....completely defeats the purpose of being a kitchen cake if it's sitting next to the grand main cake.

Jayde Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 12:48am
post #4 of 10

Wouldn't that make people think that its the groom's cake if its sitting next to the regular cake??

Jayde Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 12:48am
post #5 of 10

Wouldn't that make people think that its the groom's cake if its sitting next to the regular cake??

indydebi Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 1:30am
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennySue

....and a 1/3 sheet kitchen cake.



Is it a sheet cake or a kitchen cake? Sheet = single layer, no filling. Kitchen = 2-layer sheet cake with filling.

If you are going to cut the cake from the cake table, why not just bring the sheet/kitchen cake out when you need it, after the wedding cake is all cut and served. *IF* anyone notices it's a sheet/kitchen, they'll just think it's an extra cake. If it's a true kitchen cake, I dont' think anyone will care since lots of weddings have sheet cakes on the side. It's not unusual to have one .... so it's not odd to see one.

PennySue Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 1:43am
post #7 of 10

Well, that was my thought, that maybe guests might wonder why they didn't get a piece of cake with a 1"x2" piece of fondant on it...which they may or may not even eat (though that is not the point). I wasn't going to have it sitting there next to the main cake, just bring it out when and if it was needed. I have someone helping me with the cutting, maybe I should have her cut it in the kitchen of the venue. Golly, as if I'm not stressed enough already about this cake! I guess I could go ahead and cover it with fondant. What to do, what to do!

miny Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 2:11am
post #8 of 10

If you are going to use it ONLY if you need it, I don't see reason to cover it, IMO frosted will be ok, people will think it's part of another tier.

miny Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 2:12am
post #9 of 10

If you are going to use it ONLY if you need it, I don't see reason to cover it, IMO frosted will be ok, people will think it's part of another tier.

PennySue Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 4:13am
post #10 of 10

It is a kitchen cake, just like the wedding cake with two fillings and all, just no fondant. I like the idea about bringing it out if needed, which I'm sure it will be.

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