Heating Cores And The Pan Strips

Decorating By CakeLady1981 Updated 8 Jul 2009 , 9:57pm by Rylan

CakeLady1981 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:16pm
post #1 of 15

I have seen both the heating cores as well as the strips you put on the outside of your pan to make the cakes bake evenly and not bulge in the middle. I was wondering if these work and if they are a good investment?

14 replies
Stephi1 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:21pm
post #2 of 15

I don't use the cores - I just use a couple of flower nails. I love the bake even strips. They really do work.

CakeLady1981 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:23pm
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephi1

I don't use the cores - I just use a couple of flower nails. I love the bake even strips. They really do work.




So you just put flower nails in the batter standing up and they work the same?

tiggy2 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:26pm
post #4 of 15

I do the same as stephi1 and it works great. I love the bake even strips.

baycheeks1 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:33pm
post #5 of 15

Does the flower nail go flat side down in the bottom of the pan with the nail sticking up or is it put in after the batter is in the pan?

baycheeks1 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:36pm
post #6 of 15

Does the flower nail go flat side down in the bottom of the pan with the nail sticking up or is it put in after the batter is in the pan?

baycheeks1 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:36pm
post #7 of 15

Dup

baycheeks1 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:37pm
post #8 of 15

Does the flower nail go flat side down in the bottom of the pan with the nail sticking up or is it put in after the batter is in the pan?

CakeLady1981 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:39pm
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by baycheeks1

Does the flower nail go flat side down in the bottom of the pan with the nail sticking up or is it put in after the batter is in the pan?





also does this work with plastic flower nails or only the metal ones?

flourpowerMN Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:41pm
post #10 of 15

Instead of investing in bake even strips, I saw an idea from another backer to use strips of terry cloth towels wrapped around the outside of the pan & secured with pins or (my favorite) binder clips. Works like a charm!

That, and baking at a low temp (325) helps to keep the cake flat.

flourpowerMN Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:42pm
post #11 of 15

Instead of investing in bake even strips, I saw an idea from another baker to use strips of terry cloth towels wrapped around the outside of the pan & secured with pins or (my favorite) binder clips. Works like a charm!

That, and baking at a low temp (325) helps to keep the cake flat.

baycheeks1 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:44pm
post #12 of 15

CakeLady1981 I know its a metal nail...if it were plastic it would melt...

jawalk Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 7:48pm
post #13 of 15

The Flower Nail goes flat side down in the pan. You will need to grease & flour it as you would the cake pan. (or spray with baking spray.) The metal Flower Nail needs to be used because it helps conduct the heat and promotes even baking of the cake. Also, remember to bake your cakes at 325 degrees.

jdelaney81 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:58pm
post #14 of 15

Only the metal flower nails will work. The plastic ones will melt (not to mention the toxins released from the plastic). I only use flower nails for larger pans, but you put it in the pan flat side down and pour the batter over it. I spray the pan, put the nail in then spray the nail also.

Rylan Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 9:57pm
post #15 of 15

It depends on the recipe. With WASC, it works great. The baking strips makes the cakes moist. I've never had luck with using a heating core to make everything leveled out--but it did help bake the cake evenly.

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