Covering Cake Circles?

Decorating By MrsNancyB1 Updated 10 Jul 2009 , 4:54am by LillyLou

MrsNancyB1 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 4:52pm
post #1 of 28

I am making a 2 tier cake (10", 8"). I know that I will need to double up the bottom cake circle, and cover it. What about the 8" cake circle that will go under the 8" tier? Do I need to cover it? Does it matter if it gets greasy?

TIA!

27 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 4:58pm
post #2 of 28

I always cover mine with foil or plastic wrap. Last time I used press and seal wrap and it worked really well.

Texas_Rose Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 4:58pm
post #3 of 28

sorry, duplicate post

mkm25 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 5:03pm
post #4 of 28

Yes, you'll want to cover the cake circles between layers. First of all, the cake circle won't provide any structural support if it's greasy and flimsy. Second, no one wants to see a greasy cardboard circle...what wants to eat a cake that looks that greasy? icon_smile.gif

PinkZiab Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 5:16pm
post #5 of 28

Covering the circle between tiers isn't necessary... some people choose to do it, but it's fine without it.

indydebi Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 5:20pm
post #6 of 28

This is one of those topics that has multiple answers and you can pick the one that works best for you.

I never cover my boards. They do not get flimsy. They are cardboard, not copy paper or rice paper. (And I stay and cut most of my wedding cakes so I see it firsthand). They hold up fine. Cake is supported A-OK. The board doesn't look all greasy unless you sat the cake on the cardboard side instead of the white side. Yeah, the bottom of the cardboard (the brown side) might look discolored, but it's the bottom .... no one sees it.

I don't think there is a right or wrong answer on this. Just different ways to do it, which is one of the many reasons CC is a great resource for all things cake! thumbs_up.gif

mkm25 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 5:26pm
post #7 of 28

Hmmm...good to know! Thanks, indydebi and pinkzaib. Maybe I use different cake circles, but mine are always a mess if I don't cover them first.

KSMill Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 5:29pm
post #8 of 28

I always cover mine just because I think it looks better, especially if I'm not there to cut the cake.

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:01pm
post #9 of 28

I no longer use carboards.
I cut 3/16th inch foamcore to fit the tier sizes.
I don't cover that, nor would I cover cardboard (if I used it).

Any covering on the boards could easily be torn during cake cutting, resulting in bits of saran, foil, etc., coming up with the cake slices.

I'd rather see an ugly cake board than find "bits" in my cake.

Rae

icer101 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:09pm
post #10 of 28

most people say, you need to cover the foamcore boards. to make them food safe.. is this true. correct me if i am wrong..

LillyLou Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:14pm
post #11 of 28

Wilton makes some cake boards that look like corrugated plastic. They come in the smaller sizes and have a scallop around the edge. Those might work better and you won't have to worry about any bits getting on your cake and they won't show any grease. If you don't want the scallops, they should be easy to cut off.

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:23pm
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by icer101

most people say, you need to cover the foamcore boards. to make them food safe.. is this true. correct me if i am wrong..




There is no concensus regarding this issue.
I was taught to use them by Colette Peters. She doesn't cover them.

The surface is a heavy duty paper--much heavier duty than the kraft paper covering traditional cardboard rounds.

I have no issue leaving them uncovered--I believe it to be 6 of one and half a dozen of the other, lesser of 2 evils, whatever...........

Rae

unexperienced Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:25pm
post #13 of 28

I never use the cake board for my top layer either, I prefer to just use the dowel rods and stick them in the cake I have done this numereous times for 2 and 3 layer cakes and I havent had any problems. just a thought

unexperienced Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:25pm
post #14 of 28

I never use the cake board for my top layer either, I prefer to just use the dowel rods and stick them in the cake I have done this numereous times for 2 and 3 layer cakes and I havent had any problems. just a thought

unexperienced Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:26pm
post #15 of 28

I never use the cake board for my top layer either, I prefer to just use the dowel rods and stick them in the cake I have done this numereous times for 2 and 3 layer cakes and I havent had any problems. just a thought

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:33pm
post #16 of 28

If you're not putting a cake board under your top tier, you're not supporting anything by putting dowels under it, or thru it. You're relying on the cake under it to support it.

It may have worked for you, but you're tempting fate and not following an industry standard. If a cake is destroyed because it wasn't supported properly, someone suing you for the value of the cake (presuming you sell them) would win easily.

Even if you're just doing them for family and friends, why risk an embarrassing disaster for lack of a small cake board.

Rae

icer101 Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:53pm
post #17 of 28

thank you blakescakes for the reply. i do use foamcore. but have always covered.. now i will not cover.. one less task to do. ha! thanks again.

Rylan Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 9:35pm
post #18 of 28

Plastic wrap is the best way to go. That's what I use.

Texas_Rose Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 9:46pm
post #19 of 28

The reason that I cover my foamcore is that I buy it from the craft store and it's not wrapped up in any way. There's no telling whether someone picked his nose while unpacking and stocking the foamcore, or if anything else happened to it. I know the foamcore will hold up to the grease and moisture of the cake, it's just a hygiene issue...I wouldn't eat off of a plate I bought at Walmart without washing it first, for the same reasons.

If your foamcore comes wrapped up or direct from somewhere that sells it as cake boards, then there's no need to wrap it.

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 10:41pm
post #20 of 28

I understand the concern--to a point.

Fact is, if I go to the local cake supply shop, the cardboard rounds are sitting out on shelves, the same way that the foamcore is on display in a craft store. Actually, I rarely see people pick thru the foamcore, but I've seen people pick up and finger lots of cardboard cake boards, looking for the one that's not already bent, etc.

Now, if the cardboards are wax covered, you can wipe those off with clear alcohol, a mild bleach solution, etc.--in fact, that's what I do with the foamcore boards that I cut.

If the cardboards aren't wax coated, you CAN'T sanitize them because you can't wet them.

So, for me, a sanitized piece of foamcore trumps a covering that can be shredded during cutting.

Rae

__Jamie__ Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 10:47pm
post #21 of 28

Foam core. I cover it just because it isn't a lot of work to do. Plus, I am lazy, and if I have pencil marks from a previous measuring attempt...I'm not gonna throw the foam core out.

leah_s Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 1:06am
post #22 of 28

I have never covered a board for the interior of the cake. And don't plan to start.

aligotmatt Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 1:19am
post #23 of 28

no wrapping of interior cardboard here either.

JCE62108 Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 12:18pm
post #24 of 28

I have never covered the cardboard, nor would I ever for the same reasons of some other posters. Foil and plastic wrap can easily tear while cutting and end up in the cake. It doesnt look professional either to see the cake board all torn up and in shreads. Id rather see a greasy board than pick foil out of my cake. This is something I was taught by many professionals so I stick with it.

momg9 Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 2:29pm
post #25 of 28

Now, if the cardboards are wax covered, you can wipe those off with clear alcohol, a mild bleach solution, etc.--in fact, that's what I do with the foamcore boards that I cut.

What kind of alcohol or solution do you use to sanitize them?

BlakesCakes Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 6:36pm
post #26 of 28

I've wiped boards with gin, vodka, white rum, lemon extract, & clear vanilla extract--anything that's edible or drinkable that has a high alcohol content.

You can mix a minute amount of bleach--maybe a 1/4th tsp???--in a quart of water.

Rae

Temptations Posted 9 Jul 2009 , 9:57pm
post #27 of 28

I don't wrap either and I've used both cardboard and foam core.

LillyLou Posted 10 Jul 2009 , 4:54am
post #28 of 28

BlakesCakes, thanks for the tip on cleaning foamcore board with liquids using a high alcohol content. This will make things easier!!

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