Opinions, Please?

Decorating By percussiongrrl Updated 8 Jul 2009 , 9:14pm by Texas_Rose

percussiongrrl Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 2:03am
post #1 of 20

I'm doing a bridal shower cake for my sister for Saturday. I was given one of the plates for the shower to base my cake on. The plate is bright orange with daisy-type flowers on it, so I'm doing a 2-tier cake iced in bright orange BC with fondant flowers. I finished the flowers tonight but it's my first try with fondant flowers and I'm nervous! Do you think these look alright? If you were a bride, would you be disappointed with these on your shower cake? What can I do to make them better before I put them on the cake, or at least when I do them next time? How do I make sure they stay on the cake properly?
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19 replies
JaeRodriguez Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 2:16am
post #2 of 20

Hi! I think that your flowers look great! I might make the middle a little less... tall or bulky does that make sense? and I would take a tooth pick and make little indentions in the middle part too to make it look more life like! Those are the only two things I can think of but SERIOUSLY I haven't tried fondant flowers yet and I can only hope mine look this good! If it were my cake I'd be a happy camper!

PinkLisa Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 2:23am
post #3 of 20

I think they look really nice, but to improve on them I would thin the edges. For small daisy's I just push a ball tool on then and the petals spread out for a really nice look. If they are bigger you can just roll the ball tool around the outside of the petals (leave the center of the petal thicker for strength. I love the colors! Good luckicon_smile.gif

percussiongrrl Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 2:34am
post #4 of 20

PinkLisa, I'm not sure I'm understanding what you're suggesting. Do you have pictures of daisies with the edges thinned? Where would I get a ball tool? Would Joann or Hobby Lobby have it, or would I have to order it? I'm sorry, I'm a beginner and sometimes I just don't "get it" yet!

jaybug Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 2:46am
post #5 of 20

I think your flowers are very pretty. They will look great with the orange buttercream. thumbs_up.gif

paulstonia Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 2:59am
post #6 of 20

I love your color combo on the flowers. I think all you need is to take the ball and veining tool and run up the petal a little to give it more life. If you use the ball end to indent in the middle the petals stand up a little. I did some gerber type daisies on a cake a couple weeks ago if you want to look at the yellow cake in my pictures. I've seen a lot better than mine on here but it will give you an idea. There is also a link I will try to find for you that has a great demo. And I'm sure your cake will be lovely. I just love bright orange, it's so cheery.

Texas_Rose Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 3:16am
post #7 of 20

Your flowers look very nice. I love the colors.

You can get the ball tool at Hobby Lobby. The only one you really need at first is the white one with a ball at one end and a pointed part at the other. Set the daisy on one of those pink foam pads, run the pointed part of the tool up each petal, and then use the ball to indent the center a little bit. It's also good to dry the flowers on a curved surface...either those plastic flower formers or some mini muffin tins (dust with cornstarch first.
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paulstonia Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 3:17am
post #8 of 20

Here is the link, someone else posted this here, great info.
http://www.make-fabulous-cakes.com/gum-paste-gerbera-flower.html

PinkLisa Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 3:29am
post #9 of 20

Percussiongrrl -- TexasRose described it nicelyicon_smile.gif

4theloveofcake Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 3:48am
post #10 of 20

everyone else has such great ideas for you, but i like to add some luster dust to make mine pop a bit =) just a thought.. but you did great =)

Kenzy Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 4:00am
post #11 of 20

All the above were right ~ the edges need some thinning, otherwise they look great and I love the color combo. I've attached my flowers (as I never pass up an oppertunity to show them off) Good Luck and I look forward to seeing the finished product.

loriana Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 4:09am
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by percussiongrrl

PinkLisa, I'm not sure I'm understanding what you're suggesting. Do you have pictures of daisies with the edges thinned? Where would I get a ball tool? Would Joann or Hobby Lobby have it, or would I have to order it? I'm sorry, I'm a beginner and sometimes I just don't "get it" yet!




Hey Percussiongrrl, A toothpick will do the trick. If you make an indentation near the center on each petal (when they are still moist, so next time) you will get a realistic affect. here are some daisies below, using this technique. Also, if you thin the edges a bit and prick the center with little holes, it will look like the real center of a daisy. Hope this helps!
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loriana Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 4:09am
post #13 of 20

Sorry duplicate post
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loriana Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 4:13am
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by percussiongrrl

PinkLisa, I'm not sure I'm understanding what you're suggesting. Do you have pictures of daisies with the edges thinned? Where would I get a ball tool? Would Joann or Hobby Lobby have it, or would I have to order it? I'm sorry, I'm a beginner and sometimes I just don't "get it" yet!




Hey Percussiongrrl, A toothpick will do the trick. If you make an indentation near the center on each petal (when they are still moist, so next time) you will get a realistic affect. here are some daisies below, using this technique. Also, if you thin the edges a bit and prick the center with little holes, it will look like the real center of a daisy. Hope this helps!
LL

cylstrial Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 12:44pm
post #15 of 20

You can actually use a mesh sieve to make the center look more life like too. If you don't want to take the time to prick each one with a toothpick. It makes it go a lot faster! I think they look great. I'm sure that you sister will love the cake!

CookieD-oh Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 1:03pm
post #16 of 20

Your flowers look really nice! One thing I would do, though, would be to clean up the cut edges with an x-acto knife. (Sorry, OCD rears its ugly head once again!)

percussiongrrl Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 1:28pm
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieD-oh

Your flowers look really nice! One thing I would do, though, would be to clean up the cut edges with an x-acto knife. (Sorry, OCD rears its ugly head once again!)


Can I do this now? After they're dried?

(I have the OCD issue, too. Only problem is, I haven't learned enough about this to know how to fix what drives me nuts!)

CookieD-oh Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 2:05pm
post #18 of 20

[quote="percussiongrrl] (I have the OCD issue, too. Only problem is, I haven't learned enough about this to know how to fix what drives me nuts!)[/quote]

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I don't know for sure if it's too late (maybe someone with more experience can jump in here). If you use a really sharp blade it may be ok, but I would be afraid that the petals would snap off.

PinkLisa Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 8:50pm
post #19 of 20

To prevent that rough edge, cut the flowers on a hard surface and wiggle the cutter a bit. The flowers are probably too hard now to fix but just give one a try.

Texas_Rose Posted 8 Jul 2009 , 9:14pm
post #20 of 20

Instead of using the x-acto knife or wiggling the cutter (because that makes the flower smaller, I know...I'm the queen of OCD), make sure you're cutting the fondant on a surface that's well-dusted with cornstarch, and flip over the cutter while the flower is still in it, and run your fingers over the edges. I've noticed that I need to do that more with the wilton white daisy cutters and also with the jem 5 petal rose cutters than I do with other shapes.

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