Anyone Ever Bake A Large Rectangle Cheesecake???

Decorating By patticake1956 Updated 7 Jul 2009 , 12:41pm by -K8memphis

patticake1956 Posted 6 Jul 2009 , 4:54pm
post #1 of 9

I need to make a 11x15x3 cheesecake and wonder if anyone has ever done this and has a recipe that would work for that size and how it should be baked?? Water Bath?? Removable bottom pan or can I use a regular sheet cake pan lined in foil in order to remove it once cooled. I want to cover it in modeling chocolate or ganache so I can add an edible image to it. Is this possible??
Patti

8 replies
brightbrats Posted 6 Jul 2009 , 5:05pm
post #2 of 9

I found this website, in my local classifieds. She may or may not be able to or will be willing to help. But here is her site anyway.

www.cheesecakes-galore.com

Hope you find what you need.

Lisa

brightbrats Posted 6 Jul 2009 , 5:06pm
post #3 of 9

I found this website, in my local classifieds. She may or may not be able to or will be willing to help. But here is her site anyway.

www.cheesecakes-galore.com

Hope you find what you need.

Lisa

SuzyNoQ Posted 6 Jul 2009 , 5:12pm
post #4 of 9

I recently did an 11x15x2 and did it according to directiions (which were 450 for crust and 10 min, lower to 200 for 30 min) i did not use any heating cores or upside down flower nails and it turned out great.

patticake1956 Posted 7 Jul 2009 , 12:10pm
post #5 of 9

Thanks for the help guys. I appreciate it. icon_smile.gif I e-mailed the site you sent Brightbrats, hopefully, they'll answer.

patticake1956 Posted 7 Jul 2009 , 12:11pm
post #6 of 9

Thanks for the help guys. I appreciate it. icon_smile.gif I e-mailed the site you sent Brightbrats, hopefully, they'll answer.

clovely Posted 7 Jul 2009 , 12:18pm
post #7 of 9

I recently did a 14" round cheesecake in a cake pan. I used a layer of yellow cake as the crust - backed a thin layer and let it cool - mashed it down a little so it was more compact, then I took it out, relined that pan with parchment and put the cake back in and poured the batter on top. I just filled the thing till it was about to the top, the height I needed, because it's not like it's going to rise. It took TONS of cream cheese! More than I expected. (I love Costco)

I definitely used a water bath AND bake even strips, I left it in the oven an hour after it was baked, and then I refrigerated it overnight before I even tried to remove it. I lined a large board with wax paper and flipped it from the pan to that board and then to the board I wanted to keep it on - quickly while it was still cold.

That was the first time I'd ever tried a cheesecake that big! I had no clue what I was doing but read as much as I could - used every tip I could find - I think I let everything get close to room temperature and then beat it with the paddle and tried not to overbeat it.

In my photos, it's the tie-dyed cake. I didn't cover the whole thing but I did decorate it with buttercream. It was really yummy and so fun!

-K8memphis Posted 7 Jul 2009 , 12:37pm
post #8 of 9

Outside the frige, cream cheese has a four hour lifespan to stay on the safe side. So be careful about how you hold it between baking and decorating and keeping it outside the chill box.

This is a cumulative lifespan--like for example if it was in your cart for 15 minutes at the store before you checked out, then 15 minute ride home then the next day it set out for 15 minutes before you baked it. It's got three hours fifteen minutes left to be out of the box.

Just a creamed thought for you, unless it was a cheesey one.

-K8memphis Posted 7 Jul 2009 , 12:41pm
post #9 of 9

Oh and cheesecake freezes like a dream and then can be handled perfectly.

One other cheese filled puff of stuff.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%