Droopy Fondant

Decorating By chocomama Updated 2 Jul 2009 , 9:34pm by BlakesCakes

chocomama Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:20am
post #1 of 16

I'm making a dinosaur cake and want to use fondant to make spikes down its back, but I'm worried that after the spikes sit in the cake for a few hours that they will get droopy from touching the BC. I need to deliver the cake the night before the party. Any ideas?

15 replies
crisseyann Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:26am
post #2 of 16

50/50 fondant and gumpaste should do the trick. HTH

chocomama Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:31am
post #3 of 16

Thanks!

chocomama Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:32am
post #4 of 16

Really? I've had the same problem with gumpaste, too.

crisseyann Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:38am
post #5 of 16

Hmmmmm, I don't know what else to tell you. Here's hoping someone with some experience can help you. Good luck. icon_smile.gif

Rylan Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:41am
post #6 of 16

If you are afraid of using fondant or gumpaste, try using chocolate.

Rylan Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:42am
post #7 of 16

If you are afraid of using fondant or gumpaste, try using chocolate.

gloria Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:43am
post #8 of 16

For each spike (if you do them separately) make 2 triangles. Put a toothpick between the 2 pieces and insert into cake.
If you do it all in one piece - make 2 pieces. Because it would be heavier I would use popsicle sticks.
Take a look at my "pool" cake. The fence is done with popsicle sticks.

gloria Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:46am
post #9 of 16

For each spike (if you do them separately) make 2 triangles. Put a toothpick between the 2 pieces and insert into cake.
If you do it all in one piece - make 2 pieces. Because it would be heavier I would use popsicle sticks.
Take a look at my "pool" cake. The fence is done with popsicle sticks.

gloria Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:47am
post #10 of 16

For each spike (if you do them separately) make 2 triangles. Put a toothpick between the 2 pieces and insert into cake.
If you do it all in one piece - make 2 pieces. Because it would be heavier I would use popsicle sticks.
Take a look at my "pool" cake. The fence is done with popsicle sticks.

chocomama Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 3:58am
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by RylanTy

If you are afraid of using fondant or gumpaste, try using chocolate.




I like that idea. If I melt it and spread it out on parchment, when could I cut it? If I wait till it's completely set won't it break easily?

Texas_Rose Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 4:09am
post #12 of 16

You can pipe the chocolate like you would frosting. Draw a pattern for the shapes you need and then tape a piece of waxed paper over it and pipe the designs with a round tip. Once they harden, peel them off of the waxed paper.

chocomama Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 4:31am
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

You can pipe the chocolate like you would frosting. Draw a pattern for the shapes you need and then tape a piece of waxed paper over it and pipe the designs with a round tip. Once they harden, peel them off of the waxed paper.




Will one side be flatter than the other?

Texas_Rose Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 4:36am
post #14 of 16

Yes...one side will be totally flat. You can either turn over the hardened piece and pipe on the flat side or make two mirror images and then stick the finished ones together.

LittleBigMomma Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 4:53am
post #15 of 16

I would use fondant and make the spikes a week in advance to let them dry.

BlakesCakes Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 9:34pm
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by gloria

For each spike (if you do them separately) make 2 triangles. Put a toothpick between the 2 pieces and insert into cake.




Try using dry spaghetti rather than toothpicks. If a toothpick "escapes" and someone accidentally eats it--BIG PROBLEM! In the food service world, hidden toothpicks render something technically inedible.

HTH
Rae

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