Diff Between Shortning And Hi-Ratio Shortning?

Decorating By madras650 Updated 6 Jul 2009 , 2:53pm by BREN28

madras650 Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 1:13am
post #1 of 9

What is the difference?

8 replies
kellertur Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 2:50am
post #2 of 9

Hi. I recently switched over and I've noticed a BIG difference on texture and stability.

http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-34464.html

Hope that helps. icon_smile.gif

BREN28 Posted 2 Jul 2009 , 1:38pm
post #3 of 9

have question about the amount you would use. in my normal recipe i would use 2 cups shortening to 2 lb ps, in that thread, i read that you would use 1 cup high ratio to 2 lb ps. one person in that thread said she used 1 cup high ratio and 1 cup butter, so if i wanted to use a recipe with half high ratio and half butter, is that what i should use or should i use 1/2 cup high ratio and 1/2 cup butter? just wondering,because i didnt want to ruin a batch of buttercream because i used to much or not enough of it.
thanks for your help!

kellertur Posted 3 Jul 2009 , 12:59am
post #4 of 9

I use Sugarshack's recipe ~ I believe it's a 1 to 1 ratio. I don't use butter, so I'm not sure. icon_redface.gif Hopefully, someone else can answer this question.

woodruffbn Posted 3 Jul 2009 , 2:48am
post #5 of 9

From what i understand, it doesn't matter what type of 'fat' you are using, your ratio for a crusting BC should be approx 1 C fat to 1Lb of sugar. So, regardless of whether you are using hi-ratio, regular shortening, or butter, it should still be one to one. So say you want to use your half butter half shortening recipe... It would be 1/2 C butter, 1/2 C shortening, and 1 LB of sugar. BTW hi ratio and regular shortening are interchangable. They are they same product, but hi ratio is formulated specifically for icings whereas regular shortening is not.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong. icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 3 Jul 2009 , 3:44am
post #6 of 9

I have no idea what the correct ratio is, but the more fat the less crusting. More sugar, more crusting. I finally figured out a way to remember which way was which: Fat is slippery so more fat will cause the icing to slide off of the cake which is what I never want to happen, so I never want "more fat" in the mix. icon_biggrin.gif

I use about 1-1/3 cups per 2 lbs of psugar.

Frankyola Posted 3 Jul 2009 , 4:05am
post #7 of 9

It is one hundred percent fat with added emulsifiers, white in color and does not contain any added salt or water. The difference between it and regular shortening is that it contains microemulsifiers that allow a batter to hold more sugar and liquid. It also gives a finer and smoother texture to cakes and help keep them moist, as well as keeps icings more stable with a less greasy mouth feel.

Hope this can help thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

Frankyola Posted 3 Jul 2009 , 4:08am
post #8 of 9

It is one hundred percent fat with added emulsifiers, white in color and does not contain any added salt or water. The difference between it and regular shortening is that it contains microemulsifiers that allow a batter to hold more sugar and liquid. It also gives a finer and smoother texture to cakes and help keep them moist, as well as keeps icings more stable with a less greasy mouth feel.

Hope this can help thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

BREN28 Posted 6 Jul 2009 , 2:53pm
post #9 of 9

thanks for the help everybody!! thumbs_up.gif

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