How Do You Thin Icing So That It Can Be Used To 'flood?'

Decorating By AlexRose Updated 30 Jun 2009 , 2:55am by RachieRach

AlexRose Posted 30 Jun 2009 , 2:41am
post #1 of 9

I've seen somewhere where normal consistency icing has been used to outline a section and then the icing is thinned and used to 'flood' the section. I'm not sure if that's making sense, but does anyone know how to do that?

I tried on one of my cakes and thinned the icing with water. It filled the section well enough, but weird white flecks of (I think!) Crisco floated to the top...

Any ideas? Thanks in advance!

8 replies
smbegg Posted 30 Jun 2009 , 2:48am
post #2 of 9

I am not sure what recipe you are using, but usually that is Royal Icing. Then you thin it with water.

I am not sure it would work with Buttercream.

Stephanie

smbegg Posted 30 Jun 2009 , 2:49am
post #3 of 9

I am not sure what recipe you are using, but usually that is Royal Icing. Then you thin it with water.

I am not sure it would work with Buttercream.

Stephanie

smbegg Posted 30 Jun 2009 , 2:50am
post #4 of 9

I am not sure what recipe you are using, but usually that is Royal Icing. Then you thin it with water.

I am not sure it would work with Buttercream.

Stephanie

smbegg Posted 30 Jun 2009 , 2:51am
post #5 of 9

I am not sure what recipe you are using, but usually that is Royal Icing. Then you thin it with water.

I am not sure it would work with Buttercream.

Stephanie

RachieRach Posted 30 Jun 2009 , 2:52am
post #6 of 9

For buttercream icing I use milk to thin the icing but you can use water as well.

I've only used the flooding technique when decorating cookies. I outline the cookie with medium consistency icing and then flood the inside with thinner icing. But I use royal icing to decorate my cookies. To thin royal icing you use water a few drops at a time and stir.

Are you trying to "flood" a decoration on your cake? Perhaps your icing was too thin?

RachieRach Posted 30 Jun 2009 , 2:53am
post #7 of 9

For buttercream icing I use milk to thin the icing but you can use water as well.

I've only used the flooding technique when decorating cookies. I outline the cookie with medium consistency icing and then flood the inside with thinner icing. But I use royal icing to decorate my cookies. To thin royal icing you use water a few drops at a time and stir.

Are you trying to "flood" a decoration on your cake? Perhaps your icing was too thin?

RachieRach Posted 30 Jun 2009 , 2:54am
post #8 of 9

For buttercream icing I use milk to thin the icing but you can use water as well.

I've only used the flooding technique when decorating cookies. I outline the cookie with medium consistency icing and then flood the inside with thinner icing. But I use royal icing to decorate my cookies. To thin royal icing you use water a few drops at a time and stir.

Are you trying to "flood" a decoration on your cake? Perhaps your icing was too thin?

RachieRach Posted 30 Jun 2009 , 2:55am
post #9 of 9

For buttercream icing I use milk to thin the icing but you can use water as well.

I've only used the flooding technique when decorating cookies. I outline the cookie with medium consistency icing and then flood the inside with thinner icing. But I use royal icing to decorate my cookies. To thin royal icing you use water a few drops at a time and stir.

Are you trying to "flood" a decoration on your cake? Perhaps your icing was too thin?

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