Trouble With Bc Roses On Flower Nail

Decorating By sugarspice Updated 28 Jun 2009 , 3:00am by Unlimited

sugarspice Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 2:55am
post #1 of 9

I have a cake order coming up that will involve BC roses. I make them on a flower nail & then set aside to dry a bit (usually not completely thru). Then I transfer them onto the cake.
The problem I am having is when I get them positioned & lightly press down on them-to attach to the dab of icing on the cake, the tips of the petals shatter quite often. I am using Crisco/ C&H sugar in a 1:1 ratio with flavorings & milk. What am I doing wrong?? Thanks!!

8 replies
poohsmomma Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 12:57pm
post #2 of 9

I have yet to master the BC rose, so I'm no help...but here's a bump.

Kiddiekakes Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 1:13pm
post #3 of 9

It sounds like your icing recipe is a bit dry.If you add just a touch more water or milk or whatever you use it should soften up...Ragged edges are from dry icing!

Unlimited Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 2:59am
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarspice

I have a cake order coming up that will involve BC roses. I make them on a flower nail & then set aside to dry a bit (usually not completely thru). Then I transfer them onto the cake.
The problem I am having is when I get them positioned & lightly press down on them-to attach to the dab of icing on the cake, the tips of the petals shatter quite often. I am using Crisco/ C&H sugar in a 1:1 ratio with flavorings & milk. What am I doing wrong?? Thanks!!




You answered your own question when you stated that you don't dry them completely through... they should be dried all the way, so you can pick them up and place them without damaging them. Be sure you make them at least 3 days ahead of time. Depending on your humidity, it may take longer to dry.

indydebi Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 3:21am
post #5 of 9

Agree....they have to air dry. Air drying removes the moisture from the rose, making it firm and making it lighter in weight. Freezing it to solidity merely slows the molecules down ... once it hits room temp, the rose thaws and the same molecules can move faster and the rose melts, wilts and wont' hold its shape. (Think back to your science class when they explained molecule speed in ice, water and steam.)

I make my roses one day, let them dry overnight and they are great to work wtih. Most of the time, I can make them in the morning and they are ok to work with by the afternoon, but letting them sit overnight, uncovered, on the counter is best.

sugarspice Posted 28 Jun 2009 , 2:22am
post #6 of 9

Ok, I will tray that. I guess I still thing the tips of the petals will break-even if they're dried through. Is it ok to lightly push them into place?

sugarspice Posted 28 Jun 2009 , 2:26am
post #7 of 9

Ok, I will tray that. I guess I still thing the tips of the petals will break-even if they're dried through. Is it ok to lightly push them into place?

indydebi Posted 28 Jun 2009 , 2:43am
post #8 of 9

Well you can't bang 'em into place with a hammer, icon_biggrin.gif but when they are air dried, you'll be amazed at how easy they are to work with and to put in place.

Unlimited Posted 28 Jun 2009 , 3:00am
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Well you can't bang 'em into place with a hammer, icon_biggrin.gif




I LOLed ha ha ha ha ha!

If you want to use them immediately, while they're still wet, you can for the top surfaces of cakes (might have to keep them where they fall though!) If you want to use them on the sides of a cake, let 'em dry 3 days or longer and you'll be able to handle them easier. Consider pressing on the center part of the rose coil rather than the exposed outer petals. Good luck!

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