Joining A New Bakery!

Business By Bethroze Updated 29 Jun 2009 , 2:11am by Bethroze

Bethroze Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 5:18pm
post #1 of 13

I have been asked to bake and decorate for a new opening bakery/bistro. This is a new venture for this woman, and new for me as well. What do I need to know? She has asked for a cake album to show customers, and I would like to really be on an order only basis. She has a woman that will be baking Hispanic pastries, and I will be the wedding/fancy fondant person. Are there any red flags I should look for?

Thanks

12 replies
MichelleM77 Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 5:42pm
post #2 of 13

I don't have any advice for you, but congratulations and I hope it works out! Sounds like fun!

Bethroze Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 7:35pm
post #3 of 13

What about contracts, money, etc? I really know nothing about this, but I am looking forward to being legal! icon_biggrin.gif

tiggy2 Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 7:45pm
post #4 of 13

Are you going to be her employee or in business for yourself?

Bethroze Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 7:53pm
post #5 of 13

I like to think of it as being a contractor, (my husband works for the government). My guess is, she would get an order for a wedding cake, call me, and I would come in and make it at the bakery. So do I charge her just for time, and use all their ingredients? I still have a month before the place is finished to get my ducks in a row.

cylstrial Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 8:43pm
post #6 of 13

You're going to have to work out all the details between you. And please make sure that you both sign a contract. And don't do it unless you are going to be getting most of the money!

Bethroze Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 2:42pm
post #7 of 13

Cylstrial, you sound like you are speaking from experience? Should I find a lawyer to help me get something in writing? I am trying to look something like this up online to find help or examples, but no luck yet.

kandu001 Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 7:47pm
post #8 of 13

I don't have any advice, but congrats and good luck! Sounds exciting!

Unlimited Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 5:46am
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bethroze

I like to think of it as being a contractor, (my husband works for the government). My guess is, she would get an order for a wedding cake, call me, and I would come in and make it at the bakery. So do I charge her just for time, and use all their ingredients? I still have a month before the place is finished to get my ducks in a row.




When I subcontracted my services to a one-stop wedding shop, they took all the orders, they charge whatever they want to charge, and they simply pay you a percentage of the total. (whatever you both agree on, or in my case--whatever they had been paying to get it done by a decorator and I had the choice to either accept it or not.) It was a sweet deal for me though, and no deliveries!

Unlimited Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 6:54am
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unlimited

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bethroze

I like to think of it as being a contractor, (my husband works for the government). My guess is, she would get an order for a wedding cake, call me, and I would come in and make it at the bakery. So do I charge her just for time, and use all their ingredients? I still have a month before the place is finished to get my ducks in a row.



When I subcontracted my services to a one-stop wedding shop, they took all the orders, they charge whatever they want to charge, and they simply pay you a percentage of the total. (whatever you both agree on, or in my case--whatever they had been paying to get it done by a decorator and I had the choice to either accept it or not.) It was a sweet deal for me though, and no deliveries!




I just looked through my records, so I'll give you a better description. They paid me 60% to almost do nothing but decorate only. They supplied EVERYTHING. I was expected to bake (at first, anyway-but we worked out another deal on that later!).

On top of that, if they sold "extras" they let me keep 100% of that! They charged an "extra" fee for anything that wasn't white decorations on white cake. If the bride wanted some chocolate cake layers=.50 extra per serving, if the bride wanted pink roses=.50 extra per serving, if the bride wanted pink AND blue roses-now she's up to 1.00 extra per serving for two colors PLUS the .50 extra for chocolate cake-now she's up to 1.50 extra per serving (prices from years ago, but still...) 1.50 extra p/s x 150 serving cake=$225. in options alone! (for what? A little more oil in the cake, maybe an extra egg or two, and a dime worth of food coloring!!!!) It wasn't uncommon for me to be paid an extra $100-225. on top of 60% of the total cost, and I didn't have to do anything extra to get it because they took all the orders. Saaaa 'Weeet! I felt sorry for the brides, but they got away with charging for every little extra thing all the time, and yes... many times the options alone totaled more than the base price of the cake.

Keep in mind, this was an everything shop. The young owners didn't really expect to make much money on cakes, unlike your bakery. They felt like it was a convenience to offer more under one roof to get brides into the store to order their wedding gowns, etc.

Subcontractors don't typically work by the hour, it's by the job... so if you work by the hour you will most likely be considered an employee. Subcontractors are typically required to use their own tools (they supplied all tools for me, but didn't have to.) Subcontractors can choose if/when they want to work and set their own hours (which can be a disadvantage to the owner--I could never allow this at one of my other businesses or we'd never get any work done if nobody shows up to work!). They may want to hire you as an employee to have more control over your scheduled hours, but it shouldn't be a concern as long as they know you'll be available when they need you the most.

Much luck!

Bethroze Posted 28 Jun 2009 , 12:49am
post #11 of 13

Wow! Sounds great, and I can't wait to get started. I stuck my nose to the window this afternoon; paint on walls, display cases, mixers, it is so cool.

It sounds like part-time employment might be easier to figure money on, but I might get paid better by percentage. I can't wait to start.

Annabakescakes Posted 28 Jun 2009 , 1:19am
post #12 of 13

The way I do it is I decorate in a caterer's back room of his kitchen. I buy everything I need, and I find all my own business, and I give him 15% of my PROFITS. So if I do a cake for $5.00 a serving x 100 servings = $500 - $50 for ingredients = $450 profit - 15% = $67.50 to him and $382.50 to me! Yay!

Bethroze Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 2:11am
post #13 of 13

The inspector will be in to check ovens and such tomorrow, so hopefully things will move along faster now.

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