Sorry, Another Ganache Question...

Decorating By CakeMommy3 Updated 21 Jul 2009 , 2:57pm by Bella-cakes

CakeMommy3 Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 11:47pm
post #1 of 13

Okay, I just read the massive 15 page ganache thread until my eyes started bleeding, and I still have a question!

Is the difference between pouring ganache and the one that you spread just the ratio? So a 3:1 or 2:1 ratio is for spreading and a 1:1 ratio is for pouring?

Or is it the temperature? Pour when it's hot, spread when it's cold?

Or is it a completely different recipe altogether??

Uggh, someone please help me, my head hurts.

12 replies
niccicola Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 11:54pm
post #2 of 13

I don't know what this other thread talked about but this is what I do, this may or may not work for you.

I always use a 1:1 ratio when making ganache. If i want it spreadable for frosting, I wait until it cools enough for my liking. Sorry, i can't give you an estimate, but it's like thick, runny fudge.

For pouring over a cake, I let it cool less than spreading consistency. So, it might look like runny fudge. Does that make sense?

I have heard that if you want it thinner, for pouring, do the 3:1 ratio, for frosting like consistency, 2:1 ratio. It's all an experiment-find out what YOU prefer.

Evoir Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 12:02am
post #3 of 13

I tend to use the same ratios too - its just a matter of temperature as to how/when you use it.

The only point of difference is that white chocolate ganache is 3:1 ratio, dark/milk is 2:1.

BillaCakes Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 3:15am
post #4 of 13

It's the ratios, not the temperature. Basically the more whipping cream you add, the thinner the ganache will be. Add more chocolate and you're closer to making to truffles. The only thing temperature will do is change the level of ease with which you apply it, ie the hotter it is the easier it is to pour. I have successfully used a 1:1 for spreading though; you simply wait until it cools some (say 10 minutes), then whip the hell out of it until it's gets a thick consistency for spreading (it will get lighter in color, be advised). The whipping adds air which increases the volume and makes it easier for icing a cake as opposed to pouring it on.

For a great resource on the ratios, try to find Alton Brown's episode on ganache, I believe it was called Art of Darkness III. He actually talks briefly about the different ratios and his method is way super easy (simply microwaving the WC for a couple of minutes as opposed to double broiler/bain marie). Hope that helps!

Bluehue Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 3:27am
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evoir

I tend to use the same ratios too - its just a matter of temperature as to how/when you use it.

The only point of difference is that white chocolate ganache is 3:1 ratio, dark/milk is 2:1.




Have to agree with the comment above.
(waves hello to Evoir icon_smile.gif )

If i want to pour my ganache i allow it to cool slightly - then stand my naked cake on a wire cake rack with a tray underneath - then slowly pour...pop ganached cake in fridge for about 30 minutes - take out - gently zap ganache till runny consistancey again - then pour 2nd coat on.
Refridgerate until required - or freeze.

Any ganache i have left over - i put into a container and pop into the freezer. If i want to pipe with it - i just zap it again at 15 second intervals until i have the right consistancey...spoon into piping back - and pipe away.....
Alls good - tooooo easy.

Bluehue icon_smile.gif

nelikate Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 11:34pm
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue


Refridgerate until required - or freeze. Any ganache i have left over - i put into a container and pop into the freezer.
Bluehue icon_smile.gif




Do you freeze a cake when it is torted and covered in ganache? If I take it out of the freezer the night before I need to cover in fondant will it be okay?

thanks
Nel

Peridot Posted 19 Jul 2009 , 11:53pm
post #7 of 13

I am going to have to find the Alton Brown episode!

BillaCakes Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 2:53am
post #8 of 13

Nelikate, I haven't ever had any issues with freezing ganache so long as it is in an airtight container, so I would guess that as long as your cakes are wrapped all nice and tight, you'd probably be ok with freezing them (although I am not a fan of freezing cakes, so if you don't have to, I wouldn't!).

I did refrigerate a cake with ganache once and the only thing was that it caused the ganache to be a bit darker but it wasn't an issue.

If you have time, I say give it a test run and see how it goes and then let us know!

Rylan Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 4:12am
post #9 of 13

I use the 2:1 ratio and 3:1 for white chocolate.

You can pour it if it hasn't set and when it has set, you spread it.

There are many recipes for ganache but you can also use the 2:1 ratio for pouring ganache.

Bluehue Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 4:42am
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelikate

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue


Refridgerate until required - or freeze. Any ganache i have left over - i put into a container and pop into the freezer.
Bluehue icon_smile.gif



Do you freeze a cake when it is torted and covered in ganache? nelikate - Yes, you can do that.
As mentioned by another CC memeber - just wrap it sercurly in a few layers of glad wrap (saran wrap) and it will be fine.

If I take it out of the freezer the night before I need to cover in fondant will it be okay? Yes, just put it on your Kitchen Bench and it will be fine to leave there overnight -
Bh icon_smile.gif

thanks
Nel


Bluehue Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 4:43am
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelikate

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue


Refridgerate until required - or freeze. Any ganache i have left over - i put into a container and pop into the freezer.
Bluehue icon_smile.gif



Do you freeze a cake when it is torted and covered in ganache? nelikate - Yes, you can do that.
As mentioned by another CC memeber - just wrap it sercurly in a few layers of glad wrap (saran wrap) and it will be fine.

If I take it out of the freezer the night before I need to cover in fondant will it be okay? Yes, just put it on your Kitchen Bench and it will be fine to leave there overnight -
Bh icon_smile.gif

thanks
Nel


nelikate Posted 20 Jul 2009 , 4:49am
post #12 of 13

thanks Bluehue!

Bella-cakes Posted 21 Jul 2009 , 2:57pm
post #13 of 13

I'm alittle confused, I want to use Ganache on a cake then cover it with fondant... do I have to whip the ganache or just let it sit a while then spread it like frosting? If anyone can help!! Thanks

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