Sticky Cake Question With Pictures

Decorating By cakelovincrazy Updated 24 Jun 2009 , 9:07pm by indydebi

cakelovincrazy Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 6:41pm
post #1 of 9

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It seems it is not meant to be for me to make this flip flop cake. I first posted a question about it sticking to the pan, now the same cake I'm having issues with.
After the cake cooled in the pan I put it on a wire rack, left on the counter about 30 minutes and then put it in the refrigerator still on the wire rack. I hurt my neck and haven't been able to move it, so I knew I wouldn't be able to get to the cake right away.
So, today 2 days later I took the cake out and trimmed off the bottom layer to even it out where the cake stuck to the pan. When I turned it over to take the wire rack off it was VERY STICKY AND MOIST. I tried to cut off the top layer to level it but I couldn't cut it because it was so sticky.
I used the WASC recipe which she said is sometimes a little sticky, but is this amount normal? How do I level it with it being so sticky? When I go to do the crumb coat how will I do it to the top with it being so sticky? I'm tempted to just toss the cake and start over because when I was wrapping it in saran wrap the left side of the cake broke!
I think I may just crumb coat it and then let my little girls play with decorating it.
Just in case though, what did I do wrong? Do you cool on a wire rack and if so how do you keep the wire indentions off and if not what do you cool on after taking it out of the pan?


TIA

8 replies
indydebi Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 7:34pm
post #2 of 9

Based on the imprints in the cake, you're using "housewife" racks instead of real cake racks. Throw those in the trash.

Buy racks that have wires going both directions and the squares are about 1/4" to 3/8" square, like this one: http://www.shopbakersnook.com/m5_view_item.html?m5:item=1582

Second, elevate the cooling racks. Turn 4 coffee cups upside down and set the cooling rack on top of these. The reason why ..... you know when you move a cake and you have a pool of water under the cake? This is the steam that came off of the cake and was trapped under the cake that was sitting just 1/4" off of the counter. The steam had nowhere to go so it collected in a pool of hot water under the cake. This pool of hot water was still generating steam, which went right back up into the cake. Result when hot, water-laden air is infused into a cake? Wet cake.

When you elevate the rack, the steam has someplace to go, to escape to.

When the cake is just barely warm to touch, wrap it in saran and freeze it. It's easier to work with a partially frozen cake and will eliminate the sticky problem.

cakelovincrazy Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 8:03pm
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Based on the imprints in the cake, you're using "housewife" racks instead of real cake racks. Throw those in the trash.

Buy racks that have wires going both directions and the squares are about 1/4" to 3/8" square, like this one: http://www./m5_view_item.html?m5:item=1582

Second, elevate the cooling racks. Turn 4 coffee cups upside down and set the cooling rack on top of these. The reason why ..... you know when you move a cake and you have a pool of water under the cake? This is the steam that came off of the cake and was trapped under the cake that was sitting just 1/4" off of the counter. The steam had nowhere to go so it collected in a pool of hot water under the cake. This pool of hot water was still generating steam, which went right back up into the cake. Result when hot, water-laden air is infused into a cake? Wet cake.

When you elevate the rack, the steam has someplace to go, to escape to.

When the cake is just barely warm to touch, wrap it in saran and freeze it. It's easier to work with a partially frozen cake and will eliminate the sticky problem.




That makes complete sense! I can't believe I didn't think of that because there is always water under th cake when I lift it off the rack.
What is the name of the racks you were talking about? The link you inserted isn't working.
Thanks so much for the feedback. I want so badly to get good at this!

Unlimited Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 8:05pm
post #4 of 9

Aw... so sorry this happened to you.

I don't use wire cooling racks at all. Out of the oven, cool in the pan 20-30 minutes, put correct size cardboard on top of cake in pan, dump/slam or however you choose to turn all upside down, put another correct size cardboard on cake's exposed bottom and immediately flip back over to the correct orientation to cool. The bottom of the cake won't stick to the cardboard as badly as the "skinned" top will, and it won't crack during the final cooling period while it's sitting flat instead of cooling upside down on the possibly humped top.

cupcakemkr Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 8:12pm
post #5 of 9

cakelovin - the racks like this:
http://www.superprod.com/product/807400.do?cid=shopping.com_807400

you could also line your rack with wax paper to prevent sticking or spray with baking spray/cake release

indydebi Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 8:17pm
post #6 of 9

sorry that link didn't work ... try this one on the wilton site: http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E3150FD-475A-BAC0-5484F19087664877&killnav=1

DeeDelightful Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 8:22pm
post #7 of 9

Great information

marccrand Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 8:57pm
post #8 of 9

I use my "housewife" cooling racks - the 3 stackable Wilton racks - instead of the 4 coffee mugs like you mentioned. Just flip the cake onto your Wilton rack, flip again onto the professional rack, and then place the professional rack on top of the Wilton one. This works great to get the cake a little higher off the surface so the air circulates more, cooling it faster. It also makes sure that the surface of the table doesn't get too hot and warp - perfect when I have to put some of the cakes in the dining room to cool.

Having them cool on the cake bottom instead of the top also helps with the sticky and gumminess (is that a word) that I often have with WASC.

Now, if only the Wilton racks locked open and closed I'd buy a dozen more!

indydebi Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 9:07pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by marccrand

Just flip the cake onto your Wilton rack, flip again onto the professional rack, and then place the professional rack on top of the Wilton one. This works great to get the cake a little higher off the surface so the air circulates more, cooling it faster.



Yeah! I use my stackable Pamper Chef racks the same way! It's also a great way to stack cakes in the freezer. A flat rack with a big cake on the bottom; position the stackable rack over this cake, then place a big rack with a big cake on the stackable. Sure saves me surface space in the freezer!

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