elkinchahin Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 3:22am
post #1 of

does anyone knows a secret or recipe that would make your cakes moist, thats my biggest fear about baking, the moister of the cake.
Any help? thanks in advance

31 replies
Franluvsfrosting Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 4:52am
post #2 of

There are several recipes here on cake central that have a reputation for being moist. If you are okay with a doctored cake mix then you might give the WASC a try. Just go to the recipes section and browse through. There are lots there and they have a star ranking; higher the number of stars the more people have liked it. Your best option I think is to try a few recipes and see what you like. Happy baking!

madgeowens Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 5:04am
post #3 of

Many say to bake it lower like 330 instead of 350....and I found the cake extender recipe makes it moister.....also adding a package of instant pudding some say will do the trick......do not over bake........thats what dries it

lildragon Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 5:15am
post #4 of

I mostly make butter based cakes which have a tendency to be drier when it is overmixed and overbaked, so I have to be careful to time my mixing and baking to ensure they turn out right. I've tried the "doctored" cake mixes a couple of times and they to turn out moist and might be just what you're looking for.

elkinchahin Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 3:01pm
post #5 of

thanks everyone, i will try to do all of those. Thanks for ur help

indydebi Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 3:35pm
post #6 of

wrap the cake in saran and freeze it for a few hours. Freezing a cake actually adds moisture.

mandysue Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 6:19pm
post #7 of

Isn't it funny how whenever people taste cake they say "oh, it's so moist!" It cracks me up every time.

Anyway, I use mixes, but I replace the water with buttermilk and add an extra egg. I haven't tried anything else, but this seems to work for me. I always get complements and it's easy.

madgeowens Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 7:01am
post #8 of

why does that crack you up?

mandysue Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 1:11pm
post #9 of

I don't know....I guess I think it's funny because it seems to be the ONLY complimentary thing that people say about the taste of cake. It's like an automatic response.

How to eat cake:
1. Take a bite of cake
2. Say "Oh, it's so MOIST!"

I just find it amusing!

madgeowens Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 2:13pm

Have you ever had cake that was so dry you needed a glass of milk with every bite? hahaha maybe they have

2SchnauzerLady Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 2:18pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

Have you ever had cake that was so dry you needed a glass of milk with every bite? hahaha maybe they have




HaHa! That's how my mother baked - I grew up not knowing what a moist cake tasted like!

tallgood Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 2:30pm

To make my cakes moist, I do as I have learned here on CC, and that is to cool the cake in the pan the first 10 minutes on a wire rack, remove from pan, immediately wrap in Press-n-Seal, and cool to room temp. Torte then and ice. If you are going to use later, level and torte at this stage, insert waxed paper or parchment paper in between torted layers, wrap in Aluminum foil and toss in freezer.

BillaCakes Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 11:43pm

I actually posted this earlier, but if you're cake is already a little dry, you can use a sugar syrup or moistening syrup. It's basically one part sugar to one part water that is heated until boiling, pulled off the stove and covered to sit for three minutes. Then add flavoring as desired. Then brush it on or spray it on using a spray bottle (clean it out with warm water afterward or the syrup will clog it!). Usually my butter cakes are very moist, but occasionally I'll use this if it feels a little dry. I've never had a dry box mix unless I left it out for several days!

Evoir Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 11:52pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by mandysue

Isn't it funny how whenever people taste cake they say "oh, it's so moist!" It cracks me up every time.




My mother-in-law's stock phrase for tasting ANY cake or dessert I have made is "Ooooh, its very RICH..."

Like thats a crime? Its a freaking dessert, woman, its meant to be decadent!!

Don't know why her comment always frosts my butt, but it does. icon_mad.gif

kakedreamer1212 Posted 25 Jun 2009 , 11:56pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillaCakes

I actually posted this earlier, but if you're cake is already a little dry, you can use a sugar syrup or moistening syrup. It's basically one part sugar to one part water that is heated until boiling, pulled off the stove and covered to sit for three minutes. Then add flavoring as desired. Then brush it on or spray it on using a spray bottle (clean it out with warm water afterward or the syrup will clog it!). Usually my butter cakes are very moist, but occasionally I'll use this if it feels a little dry. I've never had a dry box mix unless I left it out for several days!


I also use the simple syrup method. I use it on box mixes and on cakes made from scratch and people love it. If you havent tried this, you MUST!

indydebi Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 12:07am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evoir

Quote:
Originally Posted by mandysue

Isn't it funny how whenever people taste cake they say "oh, it's so moist!" It cracks me up every time.



My mother-in-law's stock phrase for tasting ANY cake or dessert I have made is "Ooooh, its very RICH..."

Like thats a crime? Its a freaking dessert, woman, its meant to be decadent!!

Don't know why her comment always frosts my butt, but it does. icon_mad.gif




Next time, hand her the plate of cake and say, AS you hand it to her, "Yes, you're right ... it IS very rich!" icon_biggrin.gif

mandysue Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 1:19pm

"Too rich." I get that sometimes and always shake my head. For me, nothing is ever TOO RICH! The richer the better...that goes for dessert and men! Ha! Just kidding!

Cakeonista Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 1:36pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by mandysue

"Too rich." I get that sometimes and always shake my head. For me, nothing is ever TOO RICH! The richer the better...that goes for dessert and men! Ha! Just kidding!





Good one !!!! icon_lol.gif

Moniquea Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 1:40pm

LOL! icon_lol.gif

Yes, "It's so moist'... Sadly I've heard someone use that line on a friends cake then tell me how dry it was... ever since I do quality control icon_wink.gif

Well, decedance in men... a given icon_biggrin.gif in cake?

I have to say, my cakes have been so moist its been a problem I've worked on for a bit now... they crumble and unfortunately, as an american, I have become accustomed to a spongier cake...

I worked it out... no oil and only 2 eggs does the trick with the mix... I prefer that for cupcakes so the liners don't peel away with it... cakes 3 eggs or a Mix Dr. recipe and scuplted cakes - WASC all the way baby!!!

madgeowens Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 4:32am

My mother once, and i do mean once, baked a cake....I remember I was about 5 and we kept saying is the cake ready yet mom? She say not yet....then I watched her from the other room as she put her fist into the cake and said "Cakes ready kids" hahahaha I will never forget that and its well over 50 years ago haha....we liked it, and man was it dry

kakeladi Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 6:19pm

......... wrap in Aluminum foil and toss in freezer.........

Cake should never be wrapped directly in foil. Always wrap in wax paper or plastic wrap 1st.

indydebi Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 6:28pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

......... wrap in Aluminum foil and toss in freezer.........

Cake should never be wrapped directly in foil. Always wrap in wax paper or plastic wrap 1st.


Agree with this.
On the catering side, I never wrap a food directly with foil. Too many times, I've found little microscopic holes in the foil and my baked ham has nice and pretty little silver tips on it! If the pan has to go in the oven, I'll cut a piece of parchment paper to size, lay that on top of the (for example) ham, then cover in foil. If it's not going into the oven, I'll wrap the whole thing in saran, then cover in foil.

The reason I double wrap, using the foil, is that foods tend to be juicy and the foil helps hold it in the pan during transport.

madgeowens Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 6:39pm

Some people actually could mean "its very rich" as a compliment, don't you think? Mother in laws NEVER get the benefit of the doubt.....remember what goes around one day has a way of coming around......in other words you may be the mother in law.....icon_smile.gif just a wee bit of food for thought

indydebi Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 6:45pm

Madge, my Son-in-law tells all his friends that he has a great MIL! icon_biggrin.gif And they still make fun of me, and that's ok! thumbs_up.gif I can FEEL the LOVE!!!!!!! icon_lol.gif

But the poster said her MIL says it's rich Every. Single. Time. That would grate on my last nerve, too.

madgeowens Posted 28 Jun 2009 , 5:10am

I still say, maybe she means it as a compliment. I wish my MIL were still around that I could make her a cake. I am glad you are appreciated, as I think I am with my DIL, but I think many people give MIL a bad wrap unfairly, while others deservedly so haha I try not to let petty little things bother me I guess.

Evoir Posted 28 Jun 2009 , 8:58am

I get along pretty well with my MIL as it turns out. But like any person in this world, there are some little quirks that irritate.

For the record, its no compliment when she says it with that moue of despair/distaste on her face. If she had ONCE qualified it with saying "but its sooo delicious, yum!" I would give her the benefit of the doubt
icon_wink.gif

madgeowens Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 2:35am

Well Evoir if she does that, next time don't offer her any and see what she says lol....tell her with a moue, your sure its to decadent for her hahaha....yes I have to admit that,s catty of her...

Jenthecakelady Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 2:56am

In my white cake (from a mix) I replace the oil with 2oz of cream cheese and it makes a very moist cake. I've even had a few people tell me it's the best cake they've ever eaten.

pattiverde Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 3:23am

I'm no expert, but I think it's a matter of finding the right recipes. For example, for a chocolate cake, I love the moistness (and taste) of the Hershey's chocolate cake recipe. Love it!!! I'm still on my quest for the moistest white cake, and so far my favorite is Rose Beranbaum's White Velvet cake. I tried WASC and (gasp!) didn't like it. It is true, though, that mix cakes are very moist.

Now I have a question: Do scratch cakes stay moist or get moister when frozen, like mix cakes do? (When I used to make mix cakes, I always froze them because they really did get so, so moist that way. But I thought I read on here that scratch cakes dry out from freezing. Yes? No? Help!)

Another question: Does simple syrup change the taste of the cake? Does it oversweeten it?

icon_smile.gif patti

bakescakes1227 Posted 29 Jun 2009 , 3:35am

my secret to that is to doctor up some betty crocker mixes! this way it is also less dense!

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