Modeling Chocolate

Decorating By amanda_16_2003 Updated 4 Jul 2009 , 7:14pm by HipnotiqGlamour

amanda_16_2003 Posted 22 Jun 2009 , 11:23pm
post #1 of 15

Is this only used to make flower, figures and such...or could you use to cover the whole cake with instead of the nasty tasting fondant... Or what are other options besides buttercream and fondant, to get very smooth finish...and I will need something to make zebra print with come this december....thanks to Cake Boss on TLC now I have a friend who wants bday cake, zebra and hot pink...LOL! Please any suggestions

14 replies
noyhoward Posted 22 Jun 2009 , 11:29pm
post #2 of 15

bump

dorie67 Posted 22 Jun 2009 , 11:31pm
post #3 of 15

I've only seen it used to make things never to completely cover anything. icon_smile.gif

pattycakesnj Posted 22 Jun 2009 , 11:34pm
post #4 of 15

yes you can use it to cover cakes in place of fondant. I have never done it but know those who have and swear by it.

Annabakescakes Posted 23 Jun 2009 , 12:34am
post #5 of 15

If you get satin ice or make some mmf it doesn't have to be nasty.

Andy383240 Posted 23 Jun 2009 , 12:47am
post #6 of 15

You could try Choco-Pan, which is chcolate fondant. I got some from Gobal Sugar Art. It comes in colors or you can color and add flavor yourself to the white chocolate. It tastes good. I haven't tried to work with yet, but the package claims that you can roll it out thinly without cracking. Just an idea for you. Hope it helps.

chatty Posted 4 Jul 2009 , 7:17am
post #7 of 15

You can totally use it to cover cakes. Because it does not stretch like fondant though, I do it in two pieces. I do a disc for the top and a band for the sides. Then you just do a little piping to cover the top seam. It works great and tastes much better than fondant but hardens super fast on top of cold buttercream.
I am using it on a wedding cake tomorrow in fact.

djs328 Posted 4 Jul 2009 , 3:48pm
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by chatty

You can totally use it to cover cakes. Because it does not stretch like fondant though, I do it in two pieces. I do a disc for the top and a band for the sides. Then you just do a little piping to cover the top seam. It works great and tastes much better than fondant but hardens super fast on top of cold buttercream.
I am using it on a wedding cake tomorrow in fact.




chatty: when you say "hardens" just how firm does it get? Is it firmer than fondant? Just curious...not a fondant fan myself (I know...GASP! The horror!) but hey - who doesn't LOVE chocolate? May try this...I do love the idea of doing it in 2 pieces - you make it seem possible! icon_smile.gif

PattyT Posted 4 Jul 2009 , 4:04pm
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by djs328

Quote:
Originally Posted by chatty

You can totally use it to cover cakes. Because it does not stretch like fondant though, I do it in two pieces. I do a disc for the top and a band for the sides. Then you just do a little piping to cover the top seam. It works great and tastes much better than fondant but hardens super fast on top of cold buttercream.
I am using it on a wedding cake tomorrow in fact.



chatty: when you say "hardens" just how firm does it get? Is it firmer than fondant? Just curious...not a fondant fan myself (I know...GASP! The horror!) but hey - who doesn't LOVE chocolate? May try this...I do love the idea of doing it in 2 pieces - you make it seem possible! icon_smile.gif




Bump 'cause I'm interested too. Seems like Buddy on Cake Boss uses it for everything. I understand that it's chocolate and corn syrup, no? Do you have the quantities?

Thanks in advance.

chatty Posted 4 Jul 2009 , 4:17pm
post #10 of 15

it firms up maybe like a firm tootsie roll if you can imagine that, only thin, does that make sense? It's still pliable and workable though. I am using my pasta roller attachment on my kitchen aid to roll the long sheets for the side and it is working great!

drakegore Posted 4 Jul 2009 , 5:19pm
post #11 of 15

hello and happy fourth of july!

check out this website; not only does she make almost all her decorations out of chocolate clay, she covers many of her cakes in it.

http://dessertworks.net/weddinghome2.html

diane

HipnotiqGlamour Posted 4 Jul 2009 , 5:44pm
post #12 of 15

I have a question to go along with this thread. I know you can use chocolate or white chocolate morsels with the syrup to make the modeling chocolate but can you use mint or butterscotch flavored morsels to make the modeling chocolate too??

djs328 Posted 4 Jul 2009 , 5:49pm
post #13 of 15

That's a great question about the flavored chocolate...wondering that myself...

And OMG - that website is AMAZING...her cakes are just gorgeous!!!! Thanks, drakegore for sharing that...Def bookmarking that one!!! icon_smile.gif

drakegore Posted 4 Jul 2009 , 6:20pm
post #14 of 15

djs - you're most welcome icon_smile.gif

HipnotiqGlamour - i would think it would probably be possible, but i think the thing to be concerned about is the amount of fat. check the fat content against semi-sweet, if the same, it should work out (i would think, i have not done it). if it has higher fat content, then you are probably going to have to decrease the corn syrup a bit or blot the fat...and still the clay will most likely be a bit softer. that said, there are lots of people who use the same amount of corn syrup for white and semi-sweet even though white has more fat in it than semi-sweet. you may have to make it once to figure out what works best for you and how you plan to use it.

you can also put a couple drops of lorann oil into your semi-sweet or white chocolate to flavor and that might be the safest and easiest way to go.

diane

HipnotiqGlamour Posted 4 Jul 2009 , 7:14pm
post #15 of 15

Thank you for your reply ill give it a try

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