How Do You Prepare Cakes For Freezing? For How Long?

Decorating By mareg Updated 31 Jul 2009 , 3:57am by auntiecake

mareg Posted 22 Jun 2009 , 3:42pm
post #1 of 25

I have some cakes coming up that I will have to make ahead. I'd like to know the best way to do that.

24 replies
Rylan Posted 22 Jun 2009 , 3:48pm
post #2 of 25

bake
leave in the pan for 10 minutes
cool completely in a rack
wrap in layers of plastic wrap (cling/saran) making sure it is sealed
put in a bread bag or freezer bag (use foil for bigger cakes)
pop in the fridge

I do this most of the time with no problems. Everything stays fresh and moist.

mareg Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 3:40am
post #3 of 25

anybody else?

chrissy410 Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 3:51am
post #4 of 25

I let my cakes completely cool and then wrap them in cling wrap a few times. Then I place the wrapped cake back in the pan and pop it in the freezer. I know this sounds wierd but I started doing this after I would place cakes in the freezer and they would lose their shape because someone would place something on top of it or it would get shoved. That is my own fanatic thing that I do but it works for me. I've frozen cakes about 4-5 days ahead and they come out moist and perfect. Much easier to handle too!

Peridot Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 1:02pm
post #5 of 25

I cool my cakes for 5-10 minutes take them out of the pan, wrap in plastic warp, then wrap in foil and put in a box (the kind that you get reams of paper in that has the cover) and put that in my chest freezer in the basement. I have frozen cakes for almost a month and have had no problems with freezer burn, dryness or odor of any kind or being smashed or squashed.

My cakes are just as good as the day I bake them. Great flavor, moist and in perfect condition. I like the box (you could use any clean box) over putting them in a plastic or paper bag after wrapping as this protects them from damage. My DH doesn't think when he puts things in the freezer or removes stuff.

indydebi Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 1:23pm
post #6 of 25

I have my cakes trimmed (leveled) and out of the pan within 2 minutes. I let them cool just enough that I can touch them (they will still feel slightly warm). wrap in saran (not that crappy stuff you get at the grocery ... get the commercial stuff at Sam's!) and throw in the freezer. I use just a single wrap of saran .... but again, I use the good stuff, not the crappy grocery store stuff they stick housewives with.

ktbug Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 2:47pm
post #7 of 25

How do you go about thawing the cake? Just take it out of the freezer and let it thaw completly? How long does that take? Thanks!

indydebi Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 3:11pm
post #8 of 25

To thaw, just throw 'em on the counter. Leave them wrapped. Unlike hamburger or chicken, which takes all day to thaw, a cake can be ready to work with in about 15 to 60 minutes, depending on the size. I start working with them while they are partially frozen ... easier to handle.

Peridot Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 3:14pm
post #9 of 25

Indy..

Do you cut the cakes before you freeze if you are going to torte?

indydebi Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 3:39pm
post #10 of 25

Nope. Easier to tort when they are partially frozen.

quietude Posted 24 Jun 2009 , 3:47pm
post #11 of 25

Thanks guys, I had the same question. Do you do it this way for cupcakes too?

ktbug Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 2:10pm
post #12 of 25

Thanks for all your help! So if i freeze my cakes for a couple days take them out ice, torte and decorate do they need to be kept in the refrig?

indydebi Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 2:20pm
post #13 of 25

I never refrigerate my cakes. Refrigerating them actually makes them go staler faster.

MrsMabe Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 3:23pm
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Nope. Easier to tort when they are partially frozen.




Oh, what a good point. Less of a chance of it falling to pieces if it's frozen. I may just start freezing my cakes just for that.

HelenM2002 Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 3:26pm
post #15 of 25

Quietude, when I freeze cupcakes, I put them in a single layer in a large freezer bag, and then stack the bags inside a box so they don't get squished.

I also let my cakes cool completely, then wrap in plastic, then in foil & then in a plastic bag. My husband never uses our spare freezer, so I don't worry about stuff getting squished.

klallen21 Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 6:49pm
post #16 of 25

good info!

CarrieBear Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 11:22pm
post #17 of 25

after taking cakes out of oven I use the 20 minute rule.
keep them in the pan then flip them out so they dont fall apart, let them cool, seal tight in plastic wrap, then good cover with foil and I freeze upto a week before I need to use them.

anjaligg Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 12:34am
post #18 of 25

what is the 20 minute rule??

auntiecake Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 7:39am
post #19 of 25

I have heard 10 minutes before you remove them from the pan. I don't always do it, but the cake is more set and doesn't crack or crumble as easy. They are also easier to handle. If you level them in the pan then when you take them out of the pan they wont crack as easily also. I always use enough batter to make sure they rise a little above or even w/the pan. Leveling w/ the pan works great! Then I cover them w/the Sam's plastic and freeze for a week or less. I agree that works great as Indydebi said.

kjskid Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 12:26pm
post #20 of 25

Do you all ice them frozen or wait until they're thawed? Someone suggested I ice frozen, but when I tried that, it wept and them buttercream became too sticky to smooth done. Good thing it was just a practice cake!

indydebi Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 12:40pm
post #21 of 25

I crumb coat while partially frozen. I like them to sit and be complete thawed before I ice. If the cakes are cold or partially frozen, it inhibits the crusting process for me. I've read that many ice a cake while frozen with good results.

auntiecake Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 4:41pm
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I crumb coat while partially frozen. I like them to sit and be complete thawed before I ice. If the cakes are cold or partially frozen, it inhibits the crusting process for me. I've read that many ice a cake while frozen with good results.


I agree w/ indydebi! I have frosted when they are frozen and sometimes they get cracks in the icing from the expansion process when thawing. I have also found that if you use colored icing it will fade the icing color due to the moisture.

CarrieBear Posted 31 Jul 2009 , 12:50am
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by anjaligg

what is the 20 minute rule??




leave them in the pan for 20 min after baking before flipping them out so they have time to set and dont fall apart.
always seems to work for me. saw this suggestion some where out there on the net or you tube and seems to work so i use it.

sugarspice Posted 31 Jul 2009 , 1:21am
post #24 of 25

I just used a cake today from the freezer that had been in for 3 mos! It was wrapped in saran & then a ziploc freezer bag. I tasted it (sure it would be awful) and it was moist, no freezer burn. I filled it & used it for free samples-everyone thought it was great.

auntiecake Posted 31 Jul 2009 , 3:57am
post #25 of 25

I've always heard it was 10 minutes after baking before flipping them out! When did they add the other 10 minutes? 10 works great for me! By 20 minutes isn't it getting
SOMEWHAT cooled down. I guess it would depend on how you treated you pan before baking!

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