Help! Cake Is Sweating!!

Decorating By yvette131 Updated 20 Jun 2009 , 6:59pm by Katie-Bug

yvette131 Posted 19 Jun 2009 , 4:59pm
post #1 of 14

Left the Buttercream Cake already done overnight in the freezer and now it is sweating . Is it going to dry? Is it ruined? Help pick up is in an hour any advice?

13 replies
Katie-Bug Posted 19 Jun 2009 , 5:04pm
post #2 of 14

Everyone has different opionins on this, but mine sweat when the humidity is so high. I just try to keep the cake cool as I can, sweating is ok...melting is not. Where is the party, how much longer is it?

yvette131 Posted 19 Jun 2009 , 5:31pm
post #3 of 14

the party is for tomorrow but they are picking up in an hour. I'm just scared of how its going to look if it dries. will it have bloctches because some of the buttercream is pink?

Katie-Bug Posted 19 Jun 2009 , 5:52pm
post #4 of 14

Is it fondant or buttercream? - Nevermind I see- it is buttercream

I use mostly cream cheese frosting, but when it sweats it usually just dries shiny. I try really hard to not touch it, the least little thing will really show.
Maybe put it in the fridge instead of just being room temp.
I don't normally freeze fully decorated cakes, but I do tell brides to bring them from freezer, to fridge, to counter when eating the anniversary cake.

cakesdivine Posted 19 Jun 2009 , 6:09pm
post #5 of 14

If you airbrushed the color then you will have a problem, if the color is mixed and consistant throughout then it should dry just fine. Don't worry.

okred Posted 19 Jun 2009 , 7:16pm
post #6 of 14

I put the cake in a room with a fan, ceiling fan on low or a floor fan on low (not blowing directly on cake) and it dries nicely. Hope that helps.

yvette131 Posted 19 Jun 2009 , 7:39pm
post #7 of 14

yes i used an airbrush icon_cry.gif . it doesnt look so bad but you see the drops of sweat that are not going away, its now 2 hrs later. the customer is picking up a little later i was told but shouldnt it had dried by now?

cakesdivine Posted 19 Jun 2009 , 9:03pm
post #8 of 14

Depends, if it is a stacked tiered large cake it could still be defrosting and hence still causing sweating. If a sheet cake it should have been dry by now. Is it raining or humid where you are? If so, it will take much longer. And if airbrushed the condensation can drip down the side of the cake causing streaks and spots after drying.

sophia971 Posted 20 Jun 2009 , 1:25pm
post #9 of 14

Hi there,

I hope this isn't redundant, but I have a question about this, too! icon_smile.gif

I made two 12x18 sheet cakes frosted and filled with chocolate butter cream for a gathering at my church last night. I live in NY and it's been raining for like 40 days (j/k), so the humidity was pretty high. The cakes had been stored in the walk-in for most of the day, and were brought out a few hours before cutting time. When we all gathered to sing, etc., I noticed that the cakes were pretty sweaty. All the decoration was fine (there was just flowers and inscription), but it looked pretty damp.

Is this relatively normal? Is there anything I can do to help prevent this? Will this be the fate of al my NY summer cakes? icon_smile.gif

Thanks for helping me out!

Sophia

Katie-Bug Posted 20 Jun 2009 , 2:03pm
post #10 of 14

I bake an freeze my cakes. I then pull them from freezer to crumb coat, put in fridge to rest, an then pull for my final coat.

If the cake doesn't thaw really good at room temp. before the crumb coat it sweats. I have tried to let it thaw after I had the crumb coat, bad idea! Icing tries to run off. icon_redface.gif

During the winter, it's not that big of a deal for me it if thaws before the crumb coat because it's so cold/no humidity. It ends up thawing slowly in the fridge. If I do this when it's really hot, my cakes sweat.

I, by no means, am a expert, but sweating is pretty common for me. I'm sure those who never freeze their cakes don't have as much problem with it, though. Maybe someone people can come in an help.

- Katie icon_smile.gif

Katie-Bug Posted 20 Jun 2009 , 2:08pm
post #11 of 14

I bake an freeze my cakes. I then pull them from freezer to crumb coat, put in fridge to rest, an then pull for my final coat.

If the cake doesn't thaw really good at room temp. before the crumb coat it sweats. I have tried to let it thaw after I had the crumb coat, bad idea! Icing tries to run off. icon_redface.gif

During the winter, it's not that big of a deal for me it if thaws before the crumb coat because it's so cold/no humidity. It ends up thawing slowly in the fridge. If I do this when it's really hot, my cakes sweat.

I, by no means, am a expert, but sweating is pretty common for me. I'm sure those who never freeze their cakes don't have as much problem with it, though. Maybe someone people can come in an help.

- Katie icon_smile.gif

artscallion Posted 20 Jun 2009 , 2:17pm
post #12 of 14

I hate the term sweating, because it tends to make people think of moisture coming out of the cake itself, like the cake is actually sweating. Being the big culinary science geek that I am, I'll just copy/paste another post I just did in another thread on condensation...

"If you defrost a cake wrapped, condensation will not get on the cake to begin with.
Condensation does not come from the cake. It comes from moisture in the air in the room around the cake. Moisture in the warmer air of the room is drawn to the cooler object (the cake) where it will gather and condense on its surface. If a cake is wrapped, the moisture from the air will condense on the outside of the wrapping. If a cake is uncovered, the moisture from the air will condense on the cake itself."


Condensation has to do with temperature and dew points. Moisture in the air is in a gaseous form. This gas has a dew point temperature at which this gas will change from gas to liquid. When this gas in the room comes into contact with the cold, thawing cake, it cools to below its dewpoint and turns into liquid on the surface of the cake (or wrapper, if its wrapped)

Kiddiekakes Posted 20 Jun 2009 , 3:01pm
post #13 of 14

Airbrushing will leave droplets of color when the cake starts to thaw..that is what you are seeing..unfortunately there is nothing you can do about that.The solid colors shouldn't sweat or bleed though...

Katie-Bug Posted 20 Jun 2009 , 6:59pm
post #14 of 14

Sorry for using the wrong term, it does sound kinda gross, but it just seems to be the most common.

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