This May Be A Stupid Question...

Decorating By tcbalgord Updated 18 Jun 2009 , 7:08pm by dee_licious

tcbalgord Posted 17 Jun 2009 , 8:43pm
post #1 of 11

Can I bake using a wax board? For example I want to market cheesecake but how do I do that if my spring form pan has a metal bottom? I am really feeling clueless on this one. TIA

10 replies
mombabytiger Posted 17 Jun 2009 , 8:45pm
post #2 of 11

I don't know but I've always wondered that too.

all4cake Posted 17 Jun 2009 , 8:48pm
post #3 of 11

I'm not sure. If not, could you simply line your spring form pan with a parchment circle (and possibly a parchment band too)?

djs328 Posted 17 Jun 2009 , 8:51pm
post #4 of 11

I would like to know as well...Hmmm...waiting for an answer from some smart person!

grama_j Posted 17 Jun 2009 , 8:52pm
post #5 of 11

I don't know why it wouldn't work....... put the board right on top of the bottom plate, then you could slide the entire thing off .... YES, NO ??? icon_lol.gif

PinkZiab Posted 17 Jun 2009 , 8:58pm
post #6 of 11

I bake my cheesecakes in a standard cake pan (line the bottom with parchment). Once it is baked and thoroughly chilled (overnight). I run a knife around the outside, hit the outside of the pan with a blowtorch (you can also dip the pan in hot water briefly) and flip the cheesecake onto a plastic wrap covered cake circle, then flip it again onto the final cake circle. I don't even own a springform.

MaryAnnPriest Posted 17 Jun 2009 , 9:05pm
post #7 of 11

I bake mine in a springform pan. When it's finished, I let it chill overnight. I use a long spatula (like for frosting) and gently coax it under the edges and around. The cake pops right off & then I slide it onto a cake board and into a box. Knock on wood, I've yet to have a problem. Good luck! icon_smile.gif

djs328 Posted 17 Jun 2009 , 9:06pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I bake my cheesecakes in a standard cake pan (line the bottom with parchment). Once it is baked and thoroughly chilled (overnight). I run a knife around the outside, hit the outside of the pan with a blowtorch (you can also dip the pan in hot water briefly) and flip the cheesecake onto a plastic wrap covered cake circle, then flip it again onto the final cake circle. I don't even own a springform.




Huh - I have done that with a frozen cheesecake - didn't think to do it with a regular cheesecake. It's firm enough to do that after being chilled, huh? Good to know! icon_smile.gif (Don't know if I'm that brave or talented, though!) icon_redface.gif

tcbalgord Posted 17 Jun 2009 , 10:53pm
post #9 of 11

I'm just affraid that the "cardboard" will start on fire! lol It does make sense that it should just slid off the metal board though. Have to give it a whril! Thank you cakers!

Gingoodies Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 1:10am
post #10 of 11

I have baked cheesecake substituting a cardboard round for the metal bottom of the pan. I usually put a piece of aluminum foil under the pan so the cardboard is not near the oven rack. Never had a problem with anything catching on fire.

dee_licious Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 7:08pm
post #11 of 11

I cook my cheesecake a standard cake pan line it with parchment paper or wax paper and cook it in a bain marie, it help prevent from cracking. I also do the same procedures as PinkZiab. Hope this helps you out.

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