Delivering A Tiered Cake

Decorating By donkeemom Updated 16 Jun 2009 , 5:35pm by __Jamie__

donkeemom Posted 16 Jun 2009 , 4:29pm
post #1 of 10

I am doing a wedding cake in September. It has been many years since I have done a tiered cake and last time I did one I transported the tiers individually, and set it up on site.
Last night I was watching Cake Boss and they were delivering 4 tiered cakes assembled completely. I am just wondering do most people do them this way? It made me a little nervous just watching.
My cake is just 3 tiers, but I will be traveling about 45 minutes with it. I would just like to hear what you think is better.

9 replies
cupcakemkr Posted 16 Jun 2009 , 4:35pm
post #2 of 10

If you use the SPS, single plate system, you can deliver your cakes all stacked with out a problem. Leahs has a tutorial on how to use SPS on the How Do I? forum. http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-603925.html

Some use dowels to stack with center dowels completely through the cake and swear it is stable enough to travel. It can be risky though.

HTH

Good Luck with your cake!

indydebi Posted 16 Jun 2009 , 4:42pm
post #3 of 10

The dowel-down-the-center isn't foolproof, but I've done a 4-tier and a 5-tier in the last 2-3 weeks and delivered both of them fully assembled.

My first and only slider cake was doweled down the center, but a post-mortem autopsy indicated I had too much raspberry filling, which contributed to the problem. The dumba$$ in front of me who slammed on his brakes didn't help much, either! icon_rolleyes.gif

I do it both ways. It depends on the design, how heavy my schedule is that day, and sometimes, just what mood I'm in! icon_lol.gif

sadsmile Posted 16 Jun 2009 , 4:49pm
post #4 of 10

Oh dear Debi! There is no such thing as too much rasberry except in the cake. I lurv me some fruit filling! Just call it coulie and pour it on my plate man! I think I may try fruit pastes to add into BC instead of the sleave fillings next. Might make it more stable and who can argue with cream and fruit filling. Yumma yummow!

donkeemom Posted 16 Jun 2009 , 4:58pm
post #5 of 10

Oh my gosh Debi you poor thing! Were you able to save that cake? That is always a big fear when heading out on the road with a cake.

indydebi Posted 16 Jun 2009 , 5:12pm
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by donkeemom

Oh my gosh Debi you poor thing! Were you able to save that cake? That is always a big fear when heading out on the road with a cake.


It worked out so well! Here's the whole story: http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-579207-slider.html

Loucinda Posted 16 Jun 2009 , 5:20pm
post #7 of 10

My only issue with delivering one already stacked is the weight. There are times I am by myself and that is NOT a good thing. If you have help to carry it - your options are whatever you choose to do! Good luck - you will do fine. icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 16 Jun 2009 , 5:32pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

My only issue with delivering one already stacked is the weight. There are times I am by myself and that is NOT a good thing. If you have help to carry it - your options are whatever you choose to do! Good luck - you will do fine. icon_smile.gif


Excellent point. When I did the 5-tier, it HAD to be pre-assembled. I kept picking it up during the decorating process to make sure I could still lift it. Had hubby on stand-by in case I needed help.

donkeemom Posted 16 Jun 2009 , 5:34pm
post #9 of 10

ahhhh.....yes, very good point.

__Jamie__ Posted 16 Jun 2009 , 5:35pm
post #10 of 10

Man oh man, a three tier I did once was so flipping heavy, with the fondant and the wooden base...I barely could carry it.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%