White Chocolate Transfer Help

Decorating By Larkin121 Updated 15 Jun 2009 , 8:23am by MikeRowesHunny

Larkin121 Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 6:34pm
post #1 of 4

I've seen the white chocolate transfers on cakes and found a tutorial on it, so I decide to try it on a practice cake. It didn't work! First of all, when trying to color the chocolate (like dark chocolate with black color) it seized up. I tried again and went really slowly but it was still super thick. Second, the transfer got that look of old chocolate, like when you leave chocolate out overnight (which, duh, I guess that's what I did), but I can't figure out how it would work to serve a cake with it then unless you serve it within a few hours of making it. And third, it broke into pieces as I tried to put it on, which I'm guessing means I made it too thin.

Any tips on how to do this better next time? Can I prevent the "old" look (mottled, whitish areas)? Is there a better way to add color?

3 replies
MrsMabe Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 10:51pm
post #2 of 4

I haven't tried this, but I can explain the "old" look. It's called blooming and it's caused by heating the chocolate improperly. There's a sticky in one of the forums explaining chocolate collars which gives some good advice on handling chocolate.

momba5 Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 8:07am
post #3 of 4

would you mind posting where you found the tutorial on the white chocolate transfers?
thanks

MikeRowesHunny Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 8:23am
post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larkin121

I've seen the white chocolate transfers on cakes and found a tutorial on it, so I decide to try it on a practice cake. It didn't work! First of all, when trying to color the chocolate (like dark chocolate with black color) it seized up. I tried again and went really slowly but it was still super thick. Second, the transfer got that look of old chocolate, like when you leave chocolate out overnight (which, duh, I guess that's what I did), but I can't figure out how it would work to serve a cake with it then unless you serve it within a few hours of making it. And third, it broke into pieces as I tried to put it on, which I'm guessing means I made it too thin.

Any tips on how to do this better next time? Can I prevent the "old" look (mottled, whitish areas)? Is there a better way to add color?




Unless you are willing to invest a lot of time melting & tempering real white chocolate, just use candy melts. They will never bloom on you! I do a lot of chocolate transfer work and use candy melts to do it. If they are breaking on you, then yes, they are too thin. You want to build them up on the back to about 1/8in at least. If you are doing an item that has thin pokey out parts, build around that area with chocolate coloured the same as your icing. If you look in my gallery you will see many examples. HTH!

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