Is Freezing Cake That Important For Stacking?

Decorating By ZlatkaT Updated 15 Jun 2009 , 3:16am by Sweetcakes23

ZlatkaT Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 1:49pm
post #1 of 18

I read in many post, that many bakers are freezing cakes. I don't have that big freezer, so how important is freezing cake? I am going to make my first tiered and wedding cake soon, and don't want to run to disaster, because I won't freeze it. Would refrigerating overnight the crumb-coated cake be OK? Would that be the same as freezing? Please help!
14" WASC with Bavarian creme
10" chocolate with strawberries
6" Rd velvet
all Cream cheese, no fondant.
Thank you

17 replies
shelbur10 Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 1:53pm
post #2 of 18

If you've got a nice dense cake, you should be fine without freezing. There are a lot of pros out there who never do it. I would not refrigerate, I've heard that the fridge will dry out your cake.

Texas_Rose Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 1:55pm
post #3 of 18

I never freeze my cakes. The most important thing when you stack a cake is making sure you've got enough dowels or whatever you're using for supports.

Some people freeze the cake to make it more moist or if they're going to carve it.

ConnieSue Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 2:07pm
post #4 of 18

I prefer to freeze them slightly, but I will stack them either way. No worries it will be fine either way! It makes handling the cakes easier, and helps maintain the moist texture in my opinion.

ZlatkaT Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 2:37pm
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by shelbur10

If you've got a nice dense cake, you should be fine without freezing. There are a lot of pros out there who never do it. I would not refrigerate, I've heard that the fridge will dry out your cake.




I did not know, that refrigerating cakes will dry out the cake! I need to refrigerate because of the icing and filling. It will be in the fridge for 2 days, before delivery. I probably cannot cover the cake as well, as the icing will be Cream cheese, and that could destroy the finish look.

shelbur10 Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 3:38pm
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZlatkaT

Quote:
Originally Posted by shelbur10

If you've got a nice dense cake, you should be fine without freezing. There are a lot of pros out there who never do it. I would not refrigerate, I've heard that the fridge will dry out your cake.



I did not know, that refrigerating cakes will dry out the cake! I need to refrigerate because of the icing and filling. It will be in the fridge for 2 days, before delivery. I probably cannot cover the cake as well, as the icing will be Cream cheese, and that could destroy the finish look.




You know, I never thought of that because I don't do refrigerated frosting/fillings. Maybe the drying out only occurs if you fridge it before it's 'protected' by the frosting? Maybe someone who knows more about it can give you some more complete information.

ZlatkaT Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 5:13pm
post #7 of 18

You know, I never thought of that because I don't do refrigerated frosting/fillings. Maybe the drying out only occurs if you fridge it before it's 'protected' by the frosting? Maybe someone who knows more about it can give you some more complete information.[/quote]

That would make sense, if the cake is all frosted, the actual cake should be protected from drying.

Loucinda Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 5:15pm
post #8 of 18

I have never frozen a cake - and I have never had a problem stacking. The important thing is (as TR said above) is making sure you have a good support system. You could stack a jello cake if you have a good support system! icon_wink.gif

bakingatthebeach Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 10:43pm
post #9 of 18

I only freeze a larger cake so I can handle it easier when placing it on a bottom layer so I dont break or crack it. But if I make the cakes ahead of time, I freeze them. They dont dry out at all but then they arent in the freezer for weeks either.

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 10:47pm
post #10 of 18

I agree that an unfrosted cake may dry out if left unfrosted for an extended period of time. Mostly because now adays, we have "frost free" refrigerators. They actually do dry out uncovered food - ever seen Jell-O left uncovered? EW!

But once covered, it should last for ages.

indydebi Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 11:49pm
post #11 of 18

I learned it here on CC and I believe the person sited Cooks Illustrated as the source ....

The process that causes a cake to go stale is halted when the cake is frozen. It's accelerated when the cake is refrigerated. So under that assumption, putting a cake in the refrigerator will cause it to go stale faster.

I freeze to add moisture and for ease of handling. Are you sure your cream cheese icing needs refrigerated? Not all do. The only time I had a problem with my icing was because I put a cream cheese icing cake in the 'frig because everyone on CC said you HAD to refrigerate it. NEver again will I go thru that. I do not refrigerate.

ZlatkaT Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 1:30am
post #12 of 18

Are you sure your cream cheese icing needs refrigerated? Not all do. The only time I had a problem with my icing was because I put a cream cheese icing cake in the 'frig because everyone on CC said you HAD to refrigerate it. NEver again will I go thru that. I do not refrigerate.[/quote]

May I ask what king of trouble did you had? Just to avoid mine icon_confused.gif
And Yes, I had to refrigerate the cake, as I use Bavarian creme (yolks, heavy cream), and I think the cream cheese has to be always refrigerated, they sell it cold at the store - it is dairy - my thinking icon_cool.gif

indydebi Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 2:12am
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZlatkaT

and I think the cream cheese has to be always refrigerated, they sell it cold at the store - it is dairy - my thinking icon_cool.gif


Milk is dairy and they sell it cold, but my icing does not have to be refrigerated because the sugar and milk stablize each other.

When I put the cream cheese iced cakes in the 'frig, and then removed them, the cake developed condensation (normal when moving something cold into a room temp environment); the icing started to "melt" (the first time I'd EVER had to deal with that!) and I was genuinely concerned about it holding up at the wedding. Had a small birthday cake with roses on the edge and had the problem of the roses sliding off. Never had that either.

But I have not refrigerated it since and I've had zero problems.

SharonK1973 Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 2:39am
post #14 of 18

Indydebi.... Love your buttercream recipe! May I ask what recipe you use for your cream cheese icing? I have a cake coming up this weekend with cream cheese filling and have been stressing over the referigeration part because I DO NOT want to referigerate it if I don't have to. Thanks!

indydebi Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 2:45am
post #15 of 18

sharonK, I take my regular icing, remove some of the crisco and add some cream cheese. I can't tell you how much ..... "until it tastes right".

SharonK1973 Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 2:52am
post #16 of 18

Thanks Indy! I'll give that a try! I go into a panic if I don't have the ingredients for your buttercream on hand! Thanks again - so much!

CanadianCakin Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 2:58am
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

sharonK, I take my regular icing, remove some of the crisco and add some cream cheese. I can't tell you how much ..... "until it tastes right".


Thanks debi!!! I'm in love with your recipes!

Sweetcakes23 Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 3:16am
post #18 of 18

I'm just going to back up the theory that refrigerating cakes DOES dry them out. We were taught that in Pastry school. Freezing is best. Now, with that said...I do place crumb coated and iced cakes in for short periods of time while decorating. And I do place fondant covered cakes in refrig. overnight before delivery. they are fine! Buttercream will keep it sealed and fresh for overnight, but FONDANT, now that will keep it fresh for a week in refrigerator! I did a test one time!

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