High Fructose Corn Syrup?

Decorating By Anntee Updated 15 Jun 2009 , 1:13am by costumeczar

Anntee Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 3:55pm
post #1 of 12

Can anyone explain to me what all the hoopla is about high fructose corn syrup? icon_sad.gif

11 replies
CakeForte Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 9:07pm
post #2 of 12

in regards to what? cake? icing? calories?

Anntee Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 2:37pm
post #3 of 12

There have been a number of TV ads implying it's OK to use it. And I've noticed on some products "No Fructose Corn Syrup." ??????

Anntee Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 2:44pm
post #4 of 12

Never mind - I just googled the subject and find it's just marketing ploys and politics! Nothing wrong with HFCS - aka High Fructose corn syrup. Safe to use according to FDA. icon_smile.gif

Mike1394 Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 3:33pm
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anntee

Never mind - I just googled the subject and find it's just marketing ploys and politics! Nothing wrong with HFCS - aka High Fructose corn syrup. Safe to use according to FDA. icon_smile.gif




It's also one of the reasons the US is fat.

Mike

saberger Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 3:40pm
post #6 of 12

The whole thing about HFCS is that it is not in its natural form, so it is harder for the body to process it. Therefore it is unhealthier. As is most of everything else people eat icon_wink.gif

CakeForte Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 8:53pm
post #7 of 12

People are fat because they consume more calories than they use, and think giant portions are better. Not because of one product. A calorie is a calorie is a calorie. If you eat 5000 cals every day, and only use 2000 cals every day.....well you will be gaining weight.

That's another topic though.....

maryjsgirl Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 9:56pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeForte

People are fat because they consume more calories than they use, and think giant portions are better. Not because of one product. A calorie is a calorie is a calorie. If you eat 5000 cals every day, and only use 2000 cals every day.....well you will be gaining weight.

That's another topic though.....




Not if you eat low carb.

costumeczar Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 10:52pm
post #9 of 12

The issue is that it's a cheap source of sweetening, so food manufacturers have switched over to using it instead of straight white sugar. Because its cheap, it's easy to slip it into things that really don't need it, so it's become a staple in foods that never had it before, like tomato sauces. It's a hidden source of calories, and it's everywhere.

Sugar is sugar, a calorie of HFCS is the same as a calorie of white sugar. Your body doesn't know the difference. The problem is that we're eating more sweeteners because they're using HFCS more than ever. More calories= more fat, like Mike said.

If you want to read an interesting book about food, get The Omnivore's Dilemma. The first section is about corn and how the U.S. food supply is pretty much hogtied to corn at this point (even if you eat low carb! icon_rolleyes.gif )

Steffen74 Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 12:36am
post #10 of 12

Hm. Seems to me I read in Omnivore's Dilemma (just saw Pollan speak here in KC btw - awesome) that the issue with HFCS is that it doesn't trigger the satiety chemical in your brain so that as you're consuming it your body doesn't take notice of all the calories you've consumed and you don't start to feel full. Which means that you are likely to consume more. Which means that no, it is not the same as sugar at all.

Perhaps that wasn't in OD...could've been in the South Beach books perhaps? Anyone else know what I'm talking about?

Pollan's next book - In Defense of Food - is also a very good read. And a much quicker read that Omnivore's Dilemma, in case you're interested.

Steffen74 Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 12:41am
post #11 of 12

http://www.womentowomen.com/healthyweight/highfructosecornsyrup.aspx

Here's an interesting article on the subject. There are conflicting studies, of course, but it's always smart to look at who funded what study.

costumeczar Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 1:13am
post #12 of 12

I don't remember that (about feeling satiated), but it could be true. I just heard some doctor talking about foods that don't trigger the fuullness response, and the example he used were potato chips. That's why you can eat a whole bag of chips and you don't feel full (well, maybe not the WHOLE bag), but you can eat one orange and not need to eat ten more oranges. There are some foods that don't trigger the feeling of being full, so maybe corn syrup does act like that.

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