Painting On Fondant..?

Decorating By prncsslmndrps Updated 13 Jun 2009 , 8:02pm by sweetiesbykim

prncsslmndrps Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 2:38pm
post #1 of 8

How do you do this? Do I use the gel color as is, do I water it down? Can I use regular paint brushes or do they sell food safe ones? help??

7 replies
kansaswolf Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 3:00pm
post #2 of 8

You can either use the gel food colors as is, or thin them a bit. Water isn't always the best thing because it doesn't evaporate very quickly, but it'll do in a pinch. Most people use vodka, lemon extract or clear vanilla to mix with the colors because it evaporates quickly and doesn't leave any alcohol in the cake. I believe there are several places that sell food safe brushes as well: wilton, fondantsource.com, probably global sugar art too, but I haven't looked there. You could probably use regular brushes, but I'd clean them well. But to be on the safe side you might just go with the food safe ones! Good luck!

chellescountrycakes Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 3:59pm
post #3 of 8

great question! I have wondered too.

paste colors: is that the wilton colors that I buy? I can just use them??

tirechic Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 4:09pm
post #4 of 8

I know you can use glycerine to wilton pastes, when they get dried out, it restores the "gel like" constistancy. But im not sure if it would work to paint with. I use butter flavor or vanilla or sometimes vodka, but if you use the dusts, add more than you would think to get it like paint thickness.

chefjess819 Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 4:17pm
post #5 of 8

if you decide to go with the alcohol like vodka, try a vanilla or coconut flavored to keep the "twang" taste out of the fondant. extracts: make sure not to use imitation. the real vnilla has an alcohol level in it as well. as for brushes, at wal mart, they sell rose art children's art brushes. they have a plastic bristle that is non-toxic, since they are kid safe. and a LOT cheaper than the actual food-safe kind. just a tip! thumbs_up.gif

sweetiesbykim Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 4:18pm
post #6 of 8

Straight Americolor gel (that's in a bottle and drips, compared to Wilton thick paste color) is used for very bold solid color. Also, any luster dust mixed with alcohol, as mentioned above, works well and then you get a little shimmer with it, and it evaporates quickly and doesn't run down the fondant. I brushed a wedding cake board, covered with fondant, with super pearl luster mixed with lemon extract -Beautiful!!

prncsslmndrps Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 6:39pm
post #7 of 8

wow, thanks for all the replies ladies! I was really dumbfounded on how to do it. I'll probably just use vanilla or butter extract. Now using the dust, would you mix that into the color or paint (mixed w/extract) on after the color is painted on and dried?

sweetiesbykim Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 8:02pm
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by prncsslmndrps

wow, thanks for all the replies ladies! I was really dumbfounded on how to do it. I'll probably just use vanilla or butter extract. Now using the dust, would you mix that into the color or paint (mixed w/extract) on after the color is painted on and dried?




What look or project are you thinking of using it on? The Americolor leaves a very solid color, used straight, just like edible food-safe markers. It's already a paint-like liquid, so no need to add extract or anything to it, unless you want a really watered down look.

Mix a small amount of luster dust (start with 1/2 tsp) with a few drops of high alcohol liquid -vodka, Everclear, lemon extract, etc. I haven't used other extracts, just make sure the alcohol content is pretty high so it evaporates quickly and doesn't just sit or run on the fondant. More liquid = more opaque look.

It really depends on how you want to use it, and what effect you want to achieve (a big area of elegant pearl luster or small details for painting figurines?)icon_smile.gif

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