Users Of "indydebi Bc Recipe"

Decorating By lrlt2000 Updated 15 Jun 2009 , 7:00am by JanH

lrlt2000 Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 2:26pm
post #1 of 26

I just made my first batch! Can I use this for everything? Crumb coat, finish ice, fillings, AND tip deco??? Will it hold up for flowers and stuff (I do not do intricate flowers like roses, etc.)?

25 replies
2txmedics Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 2:39pm
post #2 of 26

I'd also like to know, I now use Becca's b/c...its a recipe she said she has used for sometime now, and her customers love, holds up in any weather and easy to work with...am wondering if its near this one your talking about....gonna have to go check it out.

2SchnauzerLady Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 2:43pm
post #3 of 26

I've used Indydebi's BC in my Wilton class - had to give the recipe to my instructor and the rest of the class as they all liked the taste and it worked well for class flowers and borders.

lrlt2000 Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 3:01pm
post #4 of 26

GREAT! Thank you. Do you alter the recipe at all for deco?? I used the minimum required milk, so I assumed that I'd use this stiffness for channeling for fillings, and then thin it as I need to for other things.

How much would you say you thinned it for flowers, rosettes, stars, etc.? Or is it trial and error icon_rolleyes.gif ?

Thanks! thumbs_up.gif

lrlt2000 Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 3:04pm
post #5 of 26

OH, one more important question. . .

As I mixed and even now after I am done, I noticed it still has that grainy look I was mentioning in another post of mine about wedding cake finishes. How can I get this Indydebi recipe to look really smooth for my finish layer?

Is there anything I can add or do to it to get it smoother? Or would you recommend using a different recipe for just that thin finish layer (I'm using the Indydebi recipe for crumb coating)? This bride is not interested in fondant thumbsdown.gif .

mclaren Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 3:41pm
post #6 of 26

i normally get air bubbles with debi's BC, but nothing that a viva towel can't smooth out icon_smile.gif

i freaked out the first time, but after 'vivaing' the icing, the cake was smooth as a baby's butt, so the next time i get bubbles, i didn't worry anymore.

cylstrial Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 7:15pm
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrlt2000

GREAT! Thank you. Do you alter the recipe at all for deco?? I used the minimum required milk, so I assumed that I'd use this stiffness for channeling for fillings, and then thin it as I need to for other things.

How much would you say you thinned it for flowers, rosettes, stars, etc.? Or is it trial and error icon_rolleyes.gif ?

Thanks! thumbs_up.gif




I love IndyDebi's icing. It's so good! I thin mine a little bit for stars. But I haven't made flowers with it. It's probably just going to be trial and error for you. I would just use whatever consistency each flower says to use and see if that works.

CanadianCakin Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 12:09am
post #8 of 26

I've done everything with it it's the only BC I use!!!!!!
For crumb coat and icing I make it really smooth with extra milk and for flowers i make it more stiff (less milk extra icing sugar) It's very versatile this way!

Rylan Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 9:30am
post #9 of 26

You can use with with everything, you can thin it with milk or thicken it with more powdered sugar.

yummy Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 4:52pm
post #10 of 26

I'll be trying this recipe for a cake due on the 20th. How much clear vanilla are you all using; have any of you added butter flavor in place of some of the vanilla, how much and what was the results? How much milk for a good icing consistency? Could I sub the milk for heavy cream?

Rylan Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 5:36pm
post #11 of 26

-I use 2 tablespoon of vanilla and 1 tablespoon of butter flavoring.

-I like the results, you can always adjust it to your preference.

-It depends on what kind of consistency you want.

-Of course you can sub heavy cream.

lrlt2000 Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 5:56pm
post #12 of 26

HELP!!!!! I just iced all 3 tiers and not only am I struggling with smoothing, but it seems to be 'breaking down' or melting!!! I don't feel like I thinned it too much, but I did a little so I could ice easily/smoothly.

Is there anything I should add to my next batch to get it to crust better?? It seems like it's not crusting stiffly enough to either hold up or to smooth with Viva or paper/cardboard, etc.

Any thoughts?? I did have a weak spot on the bottom tier, that I 'glued on'--maybe that's why it's sliding a bit on one side. But even the other two tiers seems to be 'melty'. icon_sad.gif

lrlt2000 Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 5:57pm
post #13 of 26

Further, would you definitely refrigerate a wedding cake?? Would this help with rigidity? Would it really melt badly if it was chilled first?? There is no fondant.

mareg Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 6:19pm
post #14 of 26

Was your cake warm when you iced it? Id give it more time to crust and pop in in the fridge too.

CanadianCakin Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 6:43pm
post #15 of 26

If it's warm where you are icing it takes longer to crust. It's been very hot here so I pop it in the fridge to get it to crust faster.

I find if you sift your icing sugar before adding it stops the graininess.

I use 1 tbsp vanilla and 1 tbsp butter flavour and it is to die for!

dldbrou Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 6:52pm
post #16 of 26

Just curious, why don't you just pm Indeydebi with your questions? It seems like she would be able to answer all questions concerning her recipe? Just a thought.

artscallion Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 7:17pm
post #17 of 26

I just used this recipe for the first time today. I generally don't have a need for a crusting Butter cream because I normally finish a cake in fondant. But today I had a special circumstance.

I've got a few cakes in the works for orders this week so didn't really want to add one for my in-laws' anniversary tomorrow. But today I decided to make a quick "babycake" just for the two of them that wouldn't take much work. I thought it would be a good chance to test this recipe I've heard so much about. Plus it's always good to have a good recipe for a crusting butter cream that stands up to the heat.

So I took a couple of 6"ers out of the freezer, torted, filled and frosted them, all with indydeb's butter cream. Then I slapped some of those Pepperidge Farms rolled wafers around the sides, unwrapped some Ferrero Hazelnut Rocher and filled in the top, tied a ribbon around it to hold it all in place for the 2 hour trip to NH tomorrow.

It's sitting out now (83° and humid) It'll be riding in the car for two hours tomorrow, then probably sitting out on M-I-L's table til dinner. If that ain't a butter cream test, I don't know what is.

I don't normally do cakes like this, using pre-made components, but it was simple and really looks nice, I think. I may keep this in my back pocket for future last minute cakes. I'll post in my pics in a bit.

lrlt2000 Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 7:33pm
post #18 of 26

I think I need to order some high ratio shortening. After more reading, I think this is the problem. I cannot find it anywhere around here!

STRAWBERRY1390 Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 7:46pm
post #19 of 26

I just used Indydebi's recipe for the first time myself and that is the only thing that did NOT go wrong with my day. However I didnt use crisco because I use sweetex hi ratio in my buttercreams and I replaced milk with heavy cream since I used hi ratio i was able to add 1/2 cup of cream and a 1/4 cup grand marnier and 2 Tbls of vanilla extract. delicious.

Good luck and happy caking,
Stacy

lrlt2000 Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 1:52am
post #20 of 26

Thank you! I think that was the problem. I just ordered some, but I will not have time to 'practice' again!!!! Hopefully, it will make the difference and things will turn out better with the real one this week! icon_surprised.gif

lrlt2000 Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 2:05am
post #21 of 26
mellee Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 11:54am
post #22 of 26

I use Indydebi's recipe all the time, and I love it! I use the regular WalMart vegetable shortening and the full 1/2 cup of milk. One time I forgot to use the Dream Whip and it still came out great, but I do think the Dream Whip adds a certain "something." I have no problems with her recipe at all, and I have no intention of going through the expense of high ratio shortening when the WalMart stuff is working fine.

Irlt2000, can you remember exactly how you made it? Exactly how much liquid especially, etc.? I'm certainly no expert and am just here to learn myself, but maybe someone who IS an expert can help you out if you give exact measurements, temperature of cake when frosted, room temperature, etc. Hope this will help. icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 5:28pm
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrlt2000

HELP!!!!! I just iced all 3 tiers and not only am I struggling with smoothing, but it seems to be 'breaking down' or melting!!! I don't feel like I thinned it too much, but I did a little so I could ice easily/smoothly.

Is there anything I should add to my next batch to get it to crust better?? It seems like it's not crusting stiffly enough to either hold up or to smooth with Viva or paper/cardboard, etc.

Any thoughts?? I did have a weak spot on the bottom tier, that I 'glued on'--maybe that's why it's sliding a bit on one side. But even the other two tiers seems to be 'melty'. icon_sad.gif



Crusting is a ratio of fat to sugar. More sugar .... more crusting. More fat ... less crusting. If I want to thin it, I thin it with milk, not with more fat.

HEre's my SO scientific test to get the right consistency. While it's in the mixer, raise the beater. Poke the icing gently with your finger. If your finger comes back clean, it's too thick .... add more milk. If your finger comes back with lots of gooey icing, it's too thin ... add more sugar. If your finger comes back with a hint of icing, then it's just fine.

I dont' thin it to get it to ice smooth. That is taken care off when I Melvira it. It's should be thin enough to spread easily. Not so thick that it falls off (FALLS off .... not SLIDES off).

If you have sliding or melting, I'm guessing you have too much fat and it's not crusting properly. Or if you're taking it in and out of the refrigerator, you're not giving it a chance to air-dry. When you remove something from a cold environment to a room-temp environment, it will start to "melt" and condensation will occur. When condensation is on the cake, it takes longer to crust because the icing is constantly wet .... it needs to air dry for a proper crusting.

How long to crust? 5 minutes or less. I'll ice one cake and set it aside. Then ice another cake. Then pull the first cake over and Melvira it. Then immediately Melvira the 2nd one. It's that fast. Sometimes I can Melvira it as soon as I lay down my icing spatula from icing it.

So if yours isn't crusting that fast, double check your fat/sugar ratio or how cold the cake is.

Quote:
Quote:

Further, would you definitely refrigerate a wedding cake?? Would this help with rigidity? Would it really melt badly if it was chilled first?? There is no fondant.


I never refrigerate my cakes. I did twice because everyone on here swore you had to refrigerate cream cheese icing ... so I put them in the refrigerator and it's the only time I've ever had an icing problem. So never again.....no refrigeration.

JanH Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 5:41pm
post #24 of 26

Everything you ever wanted to know to make, decorate and assemble tiered/stacked/layer cakes:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188.html

Above superthread has popular CC recipes for American b/c's (using Crisco or hi-ratio), fondant and doctored cake mix (WASC). Also has links to illustrated common cake support systems w/complete directions.

Helpful info on Melvira and other methods and so much more.

Additional sticky by Leahs on SPS:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-603925.html

HTH

lrlt2000 Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 9:20pm
post #25 of 26

Okay:

Mellee--I made it exactly to the recipe, but I did add a tad of milk to get it easier to spread. Maybe I should not have done that.

Indydebi--Thanks for jumping in! I think you may be right on adding too much liquid. Although I did follow your recipe exactly, it did fall off the test cupcake I made (meaning it was too thick, right?) so I added a tad of milk to get an easier spreading consistency. Maybe I thinned too much.

As far as refrigerating, I only did that because it started to melt a little and I thought it would firm up! I looked at the frosting and it started to look a bit 'wet' and although it sat for a good 30 minutes, it still wasn't firm enough to Viva or anything like that. It was sticking to the paper. It did crust, but the crust layer was too thin. What would that mean? Too thin or need more or less fat content? I thought the high ratio shortening was high fat and Crisco was too little fat--but that makes me think fat is a good thing, not a bad thing.

Seriously, this is a science!

JanH Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 7:00am
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrlt2000

I thought the high ratio shortening was high fat and Crisco was too little fat--but that makes me think fat is a good thing, not a bad thing.

Seriously, this is a science!




All shortening is 100% fat. icon_smile.gif

However, some shortenings contain transfat while others don't.

Crisco (no transfat) and hi-ratio (with or without transfat) also differ in the amount of stabilizers in their formulas.

History of animal and vegetable shortening (including Crisco):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shortening

Here's a product description of Sweetex from TheBakersKitchen:

http://www.thebakerskitchen.net/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=266

HTH

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