Really Stupid Torting Question

Decorating By mindywith3boys Updated 15 Jun 2009 , 12:25am by ChristaPaloma

mindywith3boys Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 12:23am
post #1 of 28

i know I should know this... icon_redface.gif But, I haven't made many cakes with fruit filling. I have a baby shower cake for this weekend and they want raspberry filling. So, I thought I would tort it rather than just have one layer of raspberry in the middle. My question is, would you then do three layers of raspberry filling, or would you put buttercream in the middle?

TIA!
~Mindy

27 replies
momg9 Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 12:42am
post #2 of 28

I've done it both ways. Usually for a wedding cake I do 3 layers of filling. I think it's just a matter of preference.

Rylan Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 9:59am
post #3 of 28

I would do buttercream in the middle. It's your preference.

ChristaPaloma Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 10:06am
post #4 of 28

For each layer, I like to "butter" the layer with a thin film of buttercream, pipe the dam and then add filling. Then I "butter" the underside of the next layer with a thin film of buttercream. This gives a really nice visual when you cut it and keeps the filling from being absorbed into the cake.

miss_sweetstory Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 10:35am
post #5 of 28

I do exactly what ChistaPaloma does. It works great and minimizes seepage of the filling to the cake.

Caths_Cakes Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 10:42am
post #6 of 28

Me too icon_smile.gif it looks very pretty when its cut into, and great to stop any spillage icon_smile.gif x

pbeckwith Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 11:49am
post #7 of 28

If you butter the underside of the next layer, how do you get it turned over onto the bottom layer without messing.
I have a real problem with anything bigger than 9". Is there a secret to getting the bigger cakes turned over and positioned?
I have a 12", 10", 8", and 6" filled and resting right now and I broke one layer of the 12" and also the 10"! Really frustrated with myself right now.

goof9j Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 11:55am
post #8 of 28

I'm with you there!!!!! It is so darn frustrating. I just patch it up as much as possible. I would also like to know the basics of getting a cake out of the pan, turning it over, leveling it. icon_cry.gif

KHalstead Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 12:06pm
post #9 of 28

goof9j, when you flip a cake out of the pan........first let it cool for about 10 min. or so.....then put your cooling rack over the pan and then hold on to both the pan and rach and flip, that way your cake is supported and doesn't break apart. As for leveling.....if you fill your pans 2/3 of the way full the cake batter will rise just slightly above the cake pan, as soon as it comes out of the oven, put a cooling rack on top of the cake and give it a push down, the sides of the pan will keep you from pushing it too far down, and then hold the rack there for a min. When you pull it off the cake will remain flat and even with the edges of the pan, and there is NO need to level the cake. It will be perfectly level. I do this with all of my cakes from sheetcakes down to 3" rounds.....it works perfectly and there is no mess of crumbs to deal with from having cut the top of the cake off!

ChristaPaloma Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 1:34pm
post #10 of 28

And to add... (for theose who don't have the agbay) for layers, I use thin plastic line like fishing line. A lifetime supply is under 10$.
Just measure the four directions (NEWS) and make an incision into the cake at each point. Hook the line into the four incisions crossing it ove in front to you. Gently pull and it slices the cake nicely even for you... I even get rid of the odd dome that way. Works like a charm!

cheatize Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 1:40pm
post #11 of 28

I'm thinking it might work even better if you put a cake board between the rack and the pan- no rack marks indenting the top of the cake.

ChristaPaloma Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 2:06pm
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

I'm thinking it might work even better if you put a cake board between the rack and the pan- no rack marks indenting the top of the cake.




Yes and I flip the cake back so the bottom is on the board because the top tends to get too moist if it is against the board...kinda mushes itself there from sweating but the bottom of the cake is crustier and doesn't do that... so many details huh ... whoda thunk cake could be so complicated lol.

ddaigle Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 2:31pm
post #13 of 28

Christa...I like the idea of "buttering" your layers first. I did a cake last week where I had a layer of Raspberry BC in between 2 layers of plain Raspberry filling. I found the layers that weren't "buttered" first to be soppy/soggy. I did not like how it soaked in. To me, I didn't find that it made it moist....I found it to be soggy. I will definately "butter" my layers first next time. Thanks for the tip!

ChristaPaloma Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 3:21pm
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddaigle

Christa...I like the idea of "buttering" your layers first. I did a cake last week where I had a layer of Raspberry BC in between 2 layers of plain Raspberry filling. I found the layers that weren't "buttered" first to be soppy/soggy. I did not like how it soaked in. To me, I didn't find that it made it moist....I found it to be soggy. I will definately "butter" my layers first next time. Thanks for the tip!




Hi Debbie.... yes I was trying to avoid telling people their cakes might be soggy lol... but there it is ... sadly soggy.... buutering really makes a difference even though it uses a lot more icing but hey..who doesn't love more of that icon_biggrin.gif

goof9j Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 4:09pm
post #15 of 28

Thank you KHalstead and all. Sometimes it is the little things that make the biggest difference.

goof9j Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 4:11pm
post #16 of 28

When you all torte, for instance, a 11 x 15, how do you handle the top layer, how do you move it so you can torte? I have broken so many cakes trying to do this. It seems everyone wants filling icon_lol.gif

Ladiesofthehouse Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 4:21pm
post #17 of 28

I sure like that idea with the fishing line and the four corners! I can't afford the Agbay at this time and the large Wilton leveler always has bad reviews, so I think I will try that tip--thank you.

I torte my 12 x 18 all the time by cutting through the 4 corners with my small Wilton leveler then finishing with a long bread knife. I then slide a flat cookie sheet between the layers and lift the top off.

After filling I carefully slide the top layer back into place, very slowly working from a short side so I can make sure it is perfectly lined up. Works great for cutting it in half, but as far as cutting onto more layers, I don't think I would try that since the layers would be so thin.

pbeckwith Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 5:56pm
post #18 of 28

I'm trying to figure out this buttering. So, you butter your bottom layer, put your fruit filling on top of that. Now's when I get confused - you butter another layer to flip over onto your fruit filling - how do you get that flipped over? Or do I have it all confused???
I love this 3 layer filling idea, I just can't figure it out.

ChristaPaloma Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 6:46pm
post #19 of 28

You just gently flip and hold with fingertips and place on top, then butter it topside wth buttercream and dam and fill... yes, it IS a little messy, lots of hand rinses, but worth the extra trouble.

JaimeAnn Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 7:44pm
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristaPaloma

And to add... (for theose who don't have the agbay) for layers, I use thin plastic line like fishing line. A lifetime supply is under 10$.
Just measure the four directions (NEWS) and make an incision into the cake at each point. Hook the line into the four incisions crossing it ove in front to you. Gently pull and it slices the cake nicely even for you... I even get rid of the odd dome that way. Works like a charm!




That's How I do it but I use Dental floss!!!!

2SchnauzerLady Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 7:50pm
post #21 of 28

I love the fishing line idea! It's like I use unwaxed dental floss to cut homemade cinnamon rolls! Saves a lot of money if you don't do a lot of cakes - I don't do enough to afford the agbay!

JaimeAnn Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 7:53pm
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbeckwith

I'm trying to figure out this buttering. So, you butter your bottom layer, put your fruit filling on top of that. Now's when I get confused - you butter another layer to flip over onto your fruit filling - how do you get that flipped over? Or do I have it all confused???
I love this 3 layer filling idea, I just can't figure it out.




It is much easier to handle your cake for torting if it is very cold (partially frozen even). I bake , then freeze overnight. Then torte , if it is a large cake cut , slide a FLAT cookie sheet between the layers and remove , lay another cookie sheet on top of that and flip over. ( Now the cut side is facing up) butter that side . then flip that over carefully onto your buttered, dammed, filled base layer.

DeeDelightful Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 7:56pm
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristaPaloma

For each layer, I like to "butter" the layer with a thin film of buttercream, pipe the dam and then add filling. Then I "butter" the underside of the next layer with a thin film of buttercream. This gives a really nice visual when you cut it and keeps the filling from being absorbed into the cake.




Me too...just occured to me to do that one day and it really turned out nicely.

PinkLisa Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 8:12pm
post #24 of 28

I torted my last cakes right from the freezer. It was very difficult to get the knife through. Should I let them thaw a bit first? I ended up smushing them a bit since I had to press so hard. It was a 10" round.

JaimeAnn Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 8:36pm
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkLisa

I torted my last cakes right from the freezer. It was very difficult to get the knife through. Should I let them thaw a bit first? I ended up smushing them a bit since I had to press so hard. It was a 10" round.




Thaw a little... Very cold, partially frozen is best for torting... Also depends on the density of the cake you are using . a fluffy cake is easier to cut when frozen, a Dense cake needs to thaw most of the way..

jenise11 Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 9:44pm
post #26 of 28

Maybe I'm confused but couldn't you just "butter", do your dam, pour your filling then pipe a thin layer of your buttercream on top of filling then place your next layer of cake on top of that?

pbeckwith Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 1:44pm
post #27 of 28

Sounds good. I've got a 10" square to do for family next week, I'm definitely trying it.

ChristaPaloma Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 12:25am
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenise11

Maybe I'm confused but couldn't you just "butter", do your dam, pour your filling then pipe a thin layer of your buttercream on top of filling then place your next layer of cake on top of that?




You could do it that way, but I would think it would be too much icing ... piping leaves a lot more icing than just a thin buttering.

If you try it, let me know how it works out for you... I'd be very interested to know.

TIA cp

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%