Making 4" Sheet Cake

Decorating By maliss Updated 13 Jun 2009 , 2:33am by maliss

maliss Posted 11 Jun 2009 , 3:53pm
post #1 of 12

My question is how do you make a 4" tall quarter sheet cake or even a 12x12 square cake. My pans are only 2" tall. Do I need to separate the two with a cake board? Tried it without and it's not working! Help!

11 replies
mariela_ms Posted 11 Jun 2009 , 4:00pm
post #2 of 12

You would have to bake 2- 2 in cakes ( 2 quarter sheet cakes or 2 - 12x12 square). You just stack them as you would any other smaller cake. With the filling it will easily give you a 4in high cake. You don't need a cake board in between. I've done a 12x12 double for 2 wedding already with no problems. Why isn't it working for you? Is it the baking, or stacking?

maliss Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 3:40pm
post #3 of 12

The problem is in the stacking. I tried a 12x12 the other day and had trouble separating the cake without breaking it. I didn't have a big enough cake lifter to get between the 2 cakes. It made a big mess.

ashleyckennedy Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 3:52pm
post #4 of 12

I recently made a half sheet cake that was 2-2 in high cakes. I must say, it was challenging getting the second layer on the first. My cake broke in half, but I managed to fill it with BC and put it in the fridge for a while. It turned out ok after all. I know how you are feeling, and of you get any ideas as to how to stack them better let me know. (Maybe the cake is too soft)

maliss Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 5:38pm
post #5 of 12

I think you are right about the cake being too soft. I will try to make it a little more dense next time. I will definitely let you know if I can figure out how to do it more easily. Thanks for your advice.

indydebi Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 5:43pm
post #6 of 12

Just remember, it's a simple 2-layer cake, like you and your mama made for years, except it's a little bigger.

freezer or partially freeze your cakes and you can pick them up and place them on top of the bottom layer real easy. No lifter needed .... even if it's just partially frozen.

If using non-frozen cakes, use a cardboard to slide it into place. You may have to coat the board with p.sugar to prevent the cake from sticking.

DeeDelightful Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 5:47pm
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Just remember, it's a simple 2-layer cake, like you and your mama made for years, except it's a little bigger.

freezer or partially freeze your cakes and you can pick them up and place them on top of the bottom layer real easy. No lifter needed .... even if it's just partially frozen.

If using non-frozen cakes, use a cardboard to slide it into place. You may have to coat the board with p.sugar to prevent the cake from sticking.




I agree with using the cardboard/cakeboard to slide it onto the top of the other cake. There may be some crumbs, but it will be fine.

pattycakesnj Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 5:47pm
post #8 of 12

I use 2 of the wilton cake lifters, it works great even for huge size cakes, never broke one yet

all4cake Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 5:54pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by maliss

The problem is in the stacking. I tried a 12x12 the other day and had trouble separating the cake without breaking it. I didn't have a big enough cake lifter to get between the 2 cakes. It made a big mess.




You had trouble separating the cake? You wanted to get between 2 cakes with a lifter?

If you bake 2 layers (whatever size), allow them to cool completely (whichever cooling method you use). Place one of the layers on a prepared cake board with the bottom of the layer on board surface(giving you a flat fit). Level the top of that layer. Apply a layer of icing on top. Level the top of the 2nd layer. Invert the 2nd layer onto a cake board (1/2 sheet is large enough to accomodate a 12" layer). Slide the cake layer to the edge of the board. Position over the first layer and allow the edge of the 2nd layer to rest in position on the first layer. Holding the 2nd layer, still on the board, at a slight angle to the first layer(this will allow it to slide off a little easier when removing the board), slowly, remove the cake board as the 2nd layer is sliding off it.

sandy1 Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 5:55pm
post #10 of 12

I use cake boards to lift and separate the layers. I then slide the top layer off the cake board, starting at the edge of the bottom layer. I keep the cake board close to the lower layer so I don't crack the top layer as I'm sliding it off the cake board. You could probably use a thin board that would be stronger than a cake board, just dust it with confectionery sugar. I hope this works for you. I've had good luck using this method.
Sandy

cylstrial Posted 12 Jun 2009 , 7:30pm
post #11 of 12

I also use cake boards to transfer the cake so that the pieces don't break. I had never heard about dusting it with powdered sugar before though. Thanks for the tip!

maliss Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 2:33am
post #12 of 12

Thanks everyone for all your great tips! I knew I could find help here.

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