Basic Advice About Large Cakes

Decorating By kcziggy Updated 11 Jun 2009 , 11:31am by beachcakes

kcziggy Posted 11 Jun 2009 , 12:25am
post #1 of 4

I am quite new to cake decorating and am comfortable with 9" rounds, but I'm baking a large cake for the first time for my daughter's baptism in a couple weeks and could sure use some advice form the experts.

I am planning to make a 2-layer, one chocolate and one yellow, raspberry filled, french bc frosted and using italian meriengue bc to decorate.

1. Is a 16" round or sheet cake better/easier for a two layer and should I follow the cake mix chart fo a 2" layer?

2. Do I need a heating core or baking strips for either?

3 What goes on top, yellow, chocolate or doesn't matter?

4. Are the Wilton pans good quality?

Any other tips you may have will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you and happy caking!

3 replies
ptanyer Posted 11 Jun 2009 , 1:02am
post #2 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcziggy

I am quite new to cake decorating and am comfortable with 9" rounds, but I'm baking a large cake for the first time for my daughter's baptism in a couple weeks and could sure use some advice form the experts.

I am planning to make a 2-layer, one chocolate and one yellow, raspberry filled, french bc frosted and using italian meriengue bc to decorate.

1. Is a 16" round or sheet cake better/easier for a two layer and should I follow the cake mix chart fo a 2" layer?

2. Do I need a heating core or baking strips for either?

3 What goes on top, yellow, chocolate or doesn't matter?

4. Are the Wilton pans good quality?

Any other tips you may have will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you and happy caking!




So is this a one-tier cake, with two layers, one layer is chocolate and one layer is yellow? The order of the layers doesn't matter, that is a personal choice.

HOWEVER, it sounds like you are making a 2-tier cake, one tier being chocolate with one filling and one tier being yellow with it's own filling.

Are you using 16" x 2" pans? If so, you will need to use heating cores or rose nails. Some people swear by the baking strips and certainly can't hurt. I have some Wilton pans that are good and I have some Fat Daddio pans that I just love. Some people swear by Magic Line. Hard call to make. If you are baking a large pan, consider lowering your oven temp to allow for slower and lower baking. Yes, I would follow the directions for the 2" pans and make 2 - layers per tier.

How many servings are you wanting to have? Might like to take a look at the Wilton cake charts and determine how many servings and what size cake pans you need to get that many servings.

HTH's. Good luck thumbs_up.gif

Rylan Posted 11 Jun 2009 , 3:14am
post #3 of 4

1. I'm confused about this question

2. I would suggest you use them although there are people who have never used them with successful results.

3. I'm not sure what you mean. If you are going to use both "types" of cakes for ONE cake then I don't think it would matter.

4. I've never used Wilton Pans but I've heard it isn't as good as Fat Daddios or Magic Line pans.

Btw, check if a 16 inch round pan would fit in your oven. If it doesn't, try using half round pans.

Good luck.

beachcakes Posted 11 Jun 2009 , 11:31am
post #4 of 4

1. It's personal preference which is easier round/sheet. I personally find rounds easier to ice; can never get those corners square enough.
2. I never use baking strips, but always use an inverted rose nail (or 2) for anything 10" or larger.
3. Doesn't matter
4. Think about how much you'll use a 16" pan, you mentioned you're new to caking. I've used mine exactly 2 times. icon_sad.gif There is a price difference between Wilton and Magic Line (which I love!), but Wilton is perfectly fine if you lower the oven temp and use a heating core. Now, if you're doing a sheet cake, I'd say splurge and go with a better quality pan, as you'll get more use out of it.

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