Someone Hired A Lab To Test Frostings

Decorating By matthewkyrankelly Updated 10 Jun 2009 , 3:25pm by -K8memphis

matthewkyrankelly Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 6:00am
post #1 of 7

Many moons ago I was hopping around online and saw that someone hired an actual microbiologist to test how long certain frosting recipes could remain out at room temp. Was it here at CC? Does anyone remember that or was it somewhere else? It was very good info. It tested all sorts of BC, and cream cheese frostings etc. Anyone?

6 replies
Rylan Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 6:09am
post #2 of 7

Hmmm I wonder.

Anntee Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 2:20pm
post #3 of 7

Sounds interesting.

-K8memphis Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 2:33pm
post #4 of 7

It was on egullet and it was Sarah Phillips of Baking 911 fame. Sarah is awesome.

-K8memphis Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 2:34pm
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

It was on egullet and it was of fame. Sarah is awesome.




edited to say-- hmm guess we can't say certain trademarks here.

mixinvixen Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 3:05pm
post #6 of 7

when i took my food safety class from the university of tennessee, the gentleman hosting the class said they will do free testing on icings if they are sent to them packed correctly (dry ice and cooler). he said if htey get too many requests, then the rules might change, but for now, they were free...maybe you could try your local dept of agriculture.

the water content of a product is what gets you in trouble...the more water, the more bacterial growth. cream cheese icing and european bc's are the worst offenders, and the ones they want to check the most.

-K8memphis Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 3:25pm
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by mixinvixen

when i took my food safety class from the university of tennessee, the gentleman hosting the class said they will do free testing on icings if they are sent to them packed correctly (dry ice and cooler). he said if htey get too many requests, then the rules might change, but for now, they were free...maybe you could try your local dept of agriculture.

the water content of a product is what gets you in trouble...the more water, the more bacterial growth. cream cheese icing and european bc's are the worst offenders, and the ones they want to check the most.




And there's so much (extra) water in butter nowadays--lots more than before.

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