Cake Boss And Charm City Cakes

Decorating By rcopeland Updated 10 Jun 2009 , 9:10pm by tonedna

rcopeland Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 4:23am
post #1 of 24

Hi Everyone!
When watching these shows, I notice they always (for the most part) deliver their cakes already stacked and assembled. Stack a bunch in the van and off they go! How do they get the cakes to travel like that without falling over?! Most decorators I've asked wouldn 't dare stack more than 2 tiers.

23 replies
Rylan Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 4:48am
post #2 of 24

Most decorators I know travel their cakes stacked. Proper driving and a good support system is the key.

rcopeland Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 4:56am
post #3 of 24

Really . . . really? Do you use wooden dowels? I haven't found any longer than 12" yet. Will one do? Or do I use something else? Any input here would be greatly appreciated.

PinkZiab Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 5:18am
post #4 of 24

I deliver all of my cakes stacked. I use wooden dowels (I get them at the hardware/home improvement store) and masonite boards throughout (no cardboard), with a center dowel that is anchored to the baseboard, which makes for a very sturdy cake. Some decorators also swear by the SPS support system.

Honestly, I had never heard of anyone assembling their cakes onsite before I came to cake central.

brea1026 Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 5:28am
post #5 of 24

I have always assembled on site, even though I use the sps system. I live in az where it is obviously very dry and worry about the satin ice cracking. So far I have never had a problem with that as long as the boards are sturdy and dont bend.

I think I am going to bit the bullet and try to stack before I leave next time.

rcopeland Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 5:34am
post #6 of 24

I feel stupid now, but what is the SPS system?

cakes22 Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 12:10pm
post #7 of 24

there is a sticky at the top of this forum with everything you need to know about SPS.


http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-603925.html

txnonnie Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 2:12pm
post #8 of 24

PinkZiab -- Did you make the system yourself? If I'm understanding you must make a hole in the center of each layer to fit on the support???

PinkZiab Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 2:39pm
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by txnonnie

PinkZiab -- Did you make the system yourself? If I'm understanding you must make a hole in the center of each layer to fit on the support???




I didn't invent this stacking system.. it's used by a lot of professional pastry chefs/cake designers. I do pre-drill the masonite circles with holes, obviously, but I don't make holes in the cakes ahead of time. I just lower the cake down over the dowel using the hole in the masonite as a guide and let it poke itself through the cake. Unless it's a cake with very large construction and I have to use a large center post (such as a PVC pipe)... in that case I would make a hole in the center of the cake to accommodate the pipe.

txnonnie Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 3:04pm
post #10 of 24

Oh, instead of separater plates or cardboard you are using the masonite. I dowel from top to bottom for support when transporting. You would not be able to do that with your method, correct?

PinkZiab Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 3:18pm
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by txnonnie

Oh, instead of separater plates or cardboard you are using the masonite. I dowel from top to bottom for support when transporting. You would not be able to do that with your method, correct?




Yes I use masonite under every tier--no separator plates or cardboard. I do have a center dowel, but it's fixed to the base board first and the tiers are lowered onto it (as opposed to stacking the cake and then hammering a dowel down through the tiers) and the bottom tier also gets hot-glued down to the larger base/presentation board, and of course every tier is doweled for support as well. I prefer this method because the center post is fixed firmly in place, and also there's no mark on the top tier to cover up where the dowel went through. It makes for a VERY sturdy cake, and I haven't had one collapse yet.

Win Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 3:25pm
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

Quote:
Originally Posted by txnonnie

Oh, instead of separater plates or cardboard you are using the masonite. I dowel from top to bottom for support when transporting. You would not be able to do that with your method, correct?



Yes I use masonite under every tier--no separator plates or cardboard. I do have a center dowel, but it's fixed to the base board first and the tiers are lowered onto it (as opposed to stacking the cake and then hammering a dowel down through the tiers) and the bottom tier also gets hot-glued down to the larger base/presentation board, and of course every tier is doweled for support as well. I prefer this method because the center post is fixed firmly in place, and also there's no mark on the top tier to cover up where the dowel went through. It makes for a VERY sturdy cake, and I haven't had one collapse yet.




PinkZ: Do you use a particular circumference for your center dowel?

Chef_Stef Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 3:26pm
post #13 of 24

I also never assemble on site. I use logicpic's support system from logicpic .com, and my cakes shifting is the last thing I worry about; they are so sturdy!

rcopeland Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 4:55pm
post #14 of 24

am also wondering about the circumference of the center dowel and also who do you attach the center dowel to the baseboard?

Bellatheball Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 5:38pm
post #15 of 24

Are the masonite boards food safe or do you cover them?

tonedna Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 5:45pm
post #16 of 24

I use cake drums, cardboard and I have driven up to 6 tiers properly stacked.
Is a matter of being careful.. I know some people love the SPS but where I work they
dont buy them so I do well with this..
This is how I do it..



Edna icon_smile.gif

Kitagrl Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 5:47pm
post #17 of 24

To me, weight is an issue....I try to transport stacked but at times it becomes too heavy. Just depends on the design. I don't like assembling on site though, so I try to avoid it.

tonedna Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 6:22pm
post #18 of 24

It does get really heavy..
Edna icon_smile.gif

taxlady1 Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 6:44pm
post #19 of 24

Heavy can be a problem thats where DH comes in handy!!!

I too am wondering if masonite is food safe??

taxlady1 Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 6:48pm
post #20 of 24

icon_redface.gif sorry duplicate post

rcopeland Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 7:10pm
post #21 of 24

Edna, thank you soooo much for the link to the video. I love your videos! They are very helpful. You are so talented!

cylstrial Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 8:24pm
post #22 of 24

I'm pretty sure that masonite is food safe. I get mine from cake stores. Some big name companies use it all the time.

tonedna Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 9:09pm
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

I'm pretty sure that masonite is food safe. I get mine from cake stores. Some big name companies use it all the time.





I would cover it anyways..Wood does soak grease too..
Edna icon_smile.gif

tonedna Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 9:10pm
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcopeland

Edna, thank you soooo much for the link to the video. I love your videos! They are very helpful. You are so talented!






Thanks!
Edna icon_smile.gif

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