How Do They Get The Layers So Thick?

Decorating By sister340 Updated 12 Jun 2009 , 6:07am by madgeowens

sister340 Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 10:12pm
post #1 of 40

I have 3" pans but they are not deep enough for the cakes I'm getting requests for. Tiered square, etc. How do you get the layers thick enough for this "chunky" look?

39 replies
tonedna Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 10:17pm
post #2 of 40

If you mean cakes that are 4 inches high, is basically 2 cakes 2 inch in height stacked together..You can fill your 3 inch pan less or you can cut your cake so is not excessively high..
Edna icon_smile.gif

rharris524 Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 10:18pm
post #3 of 40

The deepest pans I've ever seen (but I'm not an expert) are 4 inches. I think that they must just be stacking more layers...

tonedna Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 10:23pm
post #4 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by rharris524

The deepest pans I've ever seen (but I'm not an expert) are 4 inches. I think that they must just be stacking more layers...





Baking 4 inches of batter is more difficult since it can lead to undercooking on the center and over cooking on the top. Not to say it can't be achieved, but as for me I prefer to stay between 2 or 3 inches high. And yes is all stacking layers..
Edna icon_smile.gif

mcdonald Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 10:29pm
post #5 of 40

I have very tall layers (I think so anyway..compared to what I have seen from others)... I use 2" pans but I fill those puppies 3/4 full usually.. depending on if it is chocolate or white almond, etc..... They usually rise above the pan...

Then I take it and tump it over and "squish" it down by setting something on top of the cake pan. Do this until it is somewhat cooled... then you have a perfectly level cake, top and bottom... works everytime!!! And I have two nice, tall layers to put together. Sometimes I think it is too tall!!

(Did you like all my technical terms??!!)

tonedna Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 10:32pm
post #6 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdonald

I have very tall layers (I think so anyway..compared to what I have seen from others)... I use 2" pans but I fill those puppies 3/4 full usually.. depending on if it is chocolate or white almond, etc..... They usually rise above the pan...

Then I take it and tump it over and "squish" it down by setting something on top of the cake pan. Do this until it is somewhat cooled... then you have a perfectly level cake, top and bottom... works everytime!!! And I have two nice, tall layers to put together. Sometimes I think it is too tall!!

(Did you like all my technical terms??!!)




My favorite part is the "squish"..lol..but then again..i see your name and makes me wanna eat a hamburguer..I have no idea why! icon_redface.gificon_lol.gif
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

diane Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 10:37pm
post #7 of 40

but then again..i see your name and makes me wanna eat a hamburguer..I have no idea why! icon_redface.gificon_lol.gif
Edna icon_biggrin.gif[/quote]

baaaah icon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
i just choked on my sandwich!!!!!!!!!!!!! icon_biggrin.gif

jlynnw Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 10:49pm
post #8 of 40

I generally bake the cakes in a 2 inch pan and "squish" like McDonald says as well. I then cut that layer in half and fill. Using 2 cakes like this make for a rather tall cake. If I use buttercream, the filling layer is thin compared to a rich mousse, pastry cream, or fruit filling which is a bit thicker. I, however, would listen to anything tonedna suggests, she is awsome!

tonedna Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 12:22am
post #9 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by diane

but then again..i see your name and makes me wanna eat a hamburguer..I have no idea why! icon_redface.gificon_lol.gif
Edna icon_biggrin.gif




baaaah icon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
i just choked on my sandwich!!!!!!!!!!!!! icon_biggrin.gif[/quote]


Now you make me wonder if you were eating a hamburger and thats why you choke icon_confused.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
Edna icon_smile.gif

diane Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 12:26am
post #10 of 40

exactly!!!!

what a coincidence!!! icon_lol.gif

tonedna Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 12:28am
post #11 of 40

icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
Edna

PinkZiab Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 1:08am
post #12 of 40

I use 3" deep pans almost all the time and by the time I torte, fill, frost, and fondant, my tiers are well over 4" tall... if I need a taller tier than that, then I just bake more cake and add layers to the tier icon_wink.gif

txnonnie Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 1:13am
post #13 of 40

I use 2" pans and overfill them so they will rise above the pan. Once baked I cut them even with the pan and that makes them level.

mustang1964 Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 1:15am
post #14 of 40

When you squish the cakes what temperature are they? Do they fluff back up at all?

jlynnw Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 1:52am
post #15 of 40

When I pull mine out of the oven, I put a grid style cooling rack on it and squish it level with the pan. I wait 10 - 15 minutes and invert. My cake ends up firm and there is very little waste and the cake is level. Works good for me.

mustang1964 Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 4:24am
post #16 of 40

I'll have to try it, thanks.

__Jamie__ Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 4:30am
post #17 of 40

And to make mine even taller than the 4 inches, I use foam core base boards under each tier...love it!

mellee Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 10:26am
post #18 of 40

OK, for anyone who is "squishing" the cake....I'm not sure if I understand. You're keeping the cake in the pan, turning it upside down, and putting a weight on it? For how long? And doesn't the top of the hot cake stick to whatever surface it's squished against? Thanks for any help and clarification anyone can give. icon_smile.gif

newnancy Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 11:31am
post #19 of 40

I can't squish my cakes. I have to fill so the tops are high.....then trim,,,,,hubby wants to eat the tops..lol & he's skinny as a rail. I watch him eat & I gain the weight.

txnonnie Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 1:34pm
post #20 of 40

Does the 'squishing' method make the cake dense and dry? Mine are light and fluffy.

cakelady48 Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 2:07pm
post #21 of 40

I don't mean to offend all you "squishers" out there but this is not something I would recommend,I would not want to eat a cake that was squished, this will ruin the light texture of the cake. (when people eat your cake they don't want to be eating this nice fluffy cake and then all of a sudden they come upon a bite or 2 of compacted dense hunk of cake) *at least I wouldn't* and cakes should not be cooled in the pans because this can cause them to sweat. If you don't want big humps on your cakes then I recommend a couple things,,bake your cakes at a temp. of 325 and/or use bake even strips ,either bought or homemade from old towels. if you do end up with a hump then level it off when the cake has cooled. Most of the time my tiers are made up of 2 - 2" high layers ,or 3- 1 1/2" layers ,And I agree with Edna about baking 4" deep layers,,these usually have raw centers ,you would have to bake these using a heating core in the center.Better to bake shorter layers and stack them to create your tiers.
Kathy

umgrzfn Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 2:10pm
post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdonald

I have very tall layers (I think so anyway..compared to what I have seen from others)... I use 2" pans but I fill those puppies 3/4 full usually.. depending on if it is chocolate or white almond, etc..... They usually rise above the pan...

Then I take it and tump it over and "squish" it down by setting something on top of the cake pan. Do this until it is somewhat cooled... then you have a perfectly level cake, top and bottom... works everytime!!! And I have two nice, tall layers to put together. Sometimes I think it is too tall!!

(Did you like all my technical terms??!!)



My favorite part is the "squish"..lol..but then again..i see your name and makes me wanna eat a hamburguer..I have no idea why! icon_redface.gificon_lol.gif
Edna icon_biggrin.gif



That's funny Edna!! thumbs_up.gif Me too!!!!!

umgrzfn Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 2:13pm
post #23 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by newnancy

I can't squish my cakes. I have to fill so the tops are high.....then trim,,,,,hubby wants to eat the tops..lol & he's skinny as a rail. I watch him eat & I gain the weight.



I know.....what's up with that?! My hubby is the same way. I do tell people that I'm allergic to chocolate though. It's quite funny. I grab one butt cheek/hip and say "I swell here" and then I grab the other and say "and I swell here". icon_biggrin.gif

jlynnw Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 2:51pm
post #24 of 40

the amount that is squished does not change the texture so much as to notice it. Most of my cakes are firm enough to carve and stack. They are baked at a low temp to allow for even baking and they do not have a "hump" just slight risen over the edge. The cakes have never had an issue with sweating. I have never had a complaint on my cakes that have been done this way, on the contrary, I do receive compliments on just about every cake. I guess it is just what each person prefers and works for them.

pinkflower1212 Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 3:24pm
post #25 of 40

I think I will have to try this "squishing" method. After the cake cools (in the pan) I cut the cake level with the top of the pan. My kids love the extra cake, and tell me what they think of the flavor (esp if trying a new one). So what do you use for a weight? Is a phone book heavy enough or do I need to go buy a brick?

jlynnw Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 3:50pm
post #26 of 40

My cakes don't crown but just rise with the pan, maybe 1/4 inch. I have a cooling GRID that I just push down on the cake. The grid itself is heavy enough to "squish" that little bit of cake. I use a firm cake but have even tried it with white cake. It has not ever effected the taste or quality of my cakes. If I had a large crown, bump or overage, I would trim the cake first.

butterfly831915 Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 4:12pm
post #27 of 40

I tried the "squishing" method on a chocolate cake and I would have to say it didn't really change it that much, a little less light but not much.

kakeladi Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 4:26pm
post #28 of 40

The 'squishing' method has been around for yearsicon_smile.gif I don't usually have to do it because I bake at 300 degrees and the cakes bake up nice and level with the top of the pan.
What I found in using that method is often the edge of the cake (what is in the pan at the 'joint' where the top and sides meet) gets cracks; don't like that at all.

Learning how much batter to put in your pan and baking at a lower temp with or without a heating core/nail & bake even strips will result in a perfectly baked cake that does NOT NEED any squishing icon_smile.gif

L_Collins Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 4:28pm
post #29 of 40

You can also try taking your potholders and squishing the cake level. Then.,after the cake has cooled for about 10 minutes, trim the excess cake level with the pan. I then place my cakes on a cooling rack with Mason jar lids under the rack to provide adequate ventilation. I know it's a little redneck, but I'm from Arkansas and that's how we roll down here...

__Jamie__ Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 4:32pm
post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by L_Collins

I know it's a little redneck, but I'm from Arkansas and that's how we roll down here...




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