Help With Offset Stacking -When Tier Overhangs Another..

Decorating By cupcakemkr Updated 10 Jun 2009 , 3:28pm by cupcakemkr

cupcakemkr Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 6:53pm
post #1 of 13

Can someone help me understand how to stack this offset cake? Is it as difficult as my mind has made it seem?



http://www.barharborinn.com/weddingcakes/wedding_cakes_blue_shell.htm

Thanks!

12 replies
2SchnauzerLady Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 7:02pm
post #2 of 13

That's something I would like to know, too! It's beautiful!

bakery_chick Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 7:04pm
post #3 of 13

I don't think it is all that difficult. I have only ever stacked the cake so that the back of each tier lined up. It looks like this one is going every other side. It also looks like the tier hangs off the side just a smidge. I would cover my cake in whatever medium you are planning to use. I would then lightly trace a circle of the same size of my next tier on the top of the last tier in the position I want it. (I usually use a cake pan to help me visualize where I want the tier.) Then dowel as normal. As long as the cake is well doweled and balanced, it should be very steady.

nesweetcake Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 7:09pm
post #4 of 13

Try googe stressfreecakesupports I hope this goes though or weddingcakesupports. There is a gal who makes a support that should work great for this and I believe she is in Scotland, South Dakota. There was a cake a few years back with a bride on top and groom climbing a rope to the bottom done in this type of stacking. If this doesn't work, pm me and I'll get you the tele and the web address. LOL

matthewkyrankelly Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 7:09pm
post #5 of 13

Think of it as two 2-tier cakes. The bottom two and the top two are exactly the same... just off-set tiers.
The trick looks to be the second tier from the top. That layer would definitely have a round under neath for support of the layer. Most likely all layers will need the added structure. As you are stacking, picture the top tier making a column. Its outside edge should be lined up with the edge of the third tier down. The only portion of cake not supported is that second tier down "ledge".

With a good doweling and cake round plan, you should be good.

nesweetcake Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 7:11pm
post #6 of 13

opps, previous post I said the groom was climbing the rope to the bottom, I meant the top. Kathy Finholt I believe did the cake. sorry.lol

tonedna Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 7:59pm
post #7 of 13

All you need is a good cake board support. Like a foam core or maybe a few cake boards glued together. They would be hidden underneath the buutercream or fondant.
You support your cake the same way as your typicall cake and the put a few dowels to hold all the layers together.
Other ways to do it is having a center dowel. And slide all the cakes through it, but still, tou need to put support on each layer..
Hope I explain this well.
Edna icon_smile.gif

cupcakemkr Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 8:18pm
post #8 of 13

Thanks so mch for all of your replies!

So just dowel regularly and put 2 dowels right down the center?

Do you think that if I used the sps a smaller plate would be used for the overhanging tier? Like if that tier was a 10 inch you should use an 8 inch or 6 inch plate and pillar set?

tonedna Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 8:21pm
post #9 of 13

Yes, 2 dowels. You need to put them a the strongest point of the cake so they are not on the edge of any of the tiers. And dont forget every tier has it's support just like a regular cake. I don't know how SPS would work on this, since is hanging on one side.
Maybe you can PM leah ans see what she thinks.
Edna icon_smile.gif

cupcakemkr Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 8:39pm
post #10 of 13

Thanks Edna!

BREN28 Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 2:54pm
post #11 of 13

this design look kinda like the one made by tulip27f,under "round wedding cakes" from dec 2007,called "white clematis". the tiers are offset,but she uses small round "wedges" or foam core between the tiers.really pretty!

txnonnie Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 3:26pm
post #12 of 13

You can go to Earlene's website for the support system. Also there is another thread on this subject and someone, Doug, did a diagram showing how to do it with dowels.

cupcakemkr Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 3:28pm
post #13 of 13

Thanks Bren and Nonnie!

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