Quick Question For 20 Qt. Mixer Owners

Decorating By handymama Updated 10 Jun 2009 , 5:22am by handymama

handymama Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 1:22am
post #1 of 17

I use Duncan Hines mixes. How many can I do at once in my 20 qt. mixer?

16 replies
handymama Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 1:59am
post #2 of 17

Anyone?

handymama Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 2:00am
post #3 of 17

Anyone?

CherryLane Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 2:10am
post #4 of 17

10 is the max for thw WASC receipe. 11 and you have a mess on the floor! Don't ask me how I know. LOL

Put your liquid in first and then the dry in stages.

Hope that helps!

jlsheik Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 2:13am
post #5 of 17

Hi!!
I just got my 20 quart a week ago....I I tripled my WASC recipe and that is extended and has 6 cake mixes going in it.

I did my chocolate times 4 it has extra pudding and sour cream...it handled all that very well.

Good luck....I say trial and error....you will figure it out!
Heck I am, and if I can, anyone can!!

indydebi Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 2:30am
post #6 of 17

I mixed 12 betty crocker's last week .... it was pretty full, but I still had room. Had to be REAL careful when adding the oil, tho.

handymama Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 10:44am
post #7 of 17

Debi--12 is what I was wanting to do. I've only used it a few times. but have had "lump" issues each time. Today I thought I'd try using the whip in stead of the paddle to see if it goes better. In what order do you add your ingredients?

Mike1394 Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 12:08pm
post #8 of 17

20QTs. worth Hehehehe sorry just had to.

Mike

handymama Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 1:34pm
post #9 of 17

icon_lol.gif

indydebi Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 1:42pm
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by handymama

Debi--12 is what I was wanting to do. I've only used it a few times. but have had "lump" issues each time. Today I thought I'd try using the whip in stead of the paddle to see if it goes better. In what order do you add your ingredients?




Sift the cake mixes. You'll be AMAZED at what a difference this makes! I also add the oil after the batter is mixed up (mix, eggs, water, and I add an envelope of dream whip).

Here's my unscientific logic: Water and oil don't mix, so if you mix the oil in the beginning, when the water is still "water", then I'd get lumps. I found that if I mix the water up and the water becomes part of the "batter", then while oil and water don't mix, oil and BATTER mixes just fine! I did this even before I discovered that sifting trick and it made a big difference.

PinkZiab Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 2:08pm
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Here's my unscientific logic: Water and oil don't mix, so if you mix the oil in the beginning, when the water is still "water", then I'd get lumps. I found that if I mix the water up and the water becomes part of the "batter", then while oil and water don't mix, oil and BATTER mixes just fine! I did this even before I discovered that sifting trick and it made a big difference.




Well Debi, your "unscientific" logic is right on the mark! Cake mixes contain emulsifiers, and while oil and water don't "mix," you can bring them together with an emulsifier (such as egg in a salad dressing or a butter-based sauce), so when you first blend the water into the cake mix (that contains those emulsifiers) and then add the oil later, it's no surprise that it all comes together more easily!

indydebi Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 2:16pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

Well Debi, your "unscientific" logic is right on the mark!



Well dang! Sometimes I guess I AM smarter than I look! dunce.gif

handymama Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 10:48pm
post #13 of 17

Debi--what sifter do you use? I bought a big one and could have stood there cranking that thing all day without finishing. I used the whip instead of the paddle, but it was still pretty lumpy. It appears that the whip/paddle isn't coming anywhere near the bottom of the bowl; wonder if there's an adjustment. Also had some major cracking on my 14" round cakes--I think by the time I got everything mixed in (more or less) the batter had been over-worked, even though I tried hard not to. Anyway, I just finished baking 18 cakes and I'm tired. Gonna fix dinner, sit a minute, and get back at it.

indydebi Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 12:08am
post #14 of 17

I use a wire colander ..... a mesh basket with a large handle that you'd strain pasta with over the sink. Pour the cake mix in there and shake-shake-shake. Sometimes toward the end, you may have to push the mix thru the mesh (I use a gloved hand or a rubber scraper).

PinkZiab Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 12:46am
post #15 of 17

You could also get yourself a tamis sieve (also called a drum sieve). it basically looks like a round cake pan except the bottom is fine mesh and they come in a variety of sizes:

Image

indydebi Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 1:17am
post #16 of 17

Ah, man, Pink, I WANT those!!!

handymama Posted 10 Jun 2009 , 5:22am
post #17 of 17

I love the tamis sieves but every time I look at them they're very pricey. I also wonder if they'd clog with cake mix since it has a bit of a moist clumpy feel. Most of my 18 cakes are now filled and stacked. I'd used two smaller cooling racks under the 16" square, and when I tried to lift it that sucker cracked clean in two! icon_eek.gif I'd frozen it to make it easier to set on top of the first layer. Well--not hard at all when you do it in two pieces. Everything seems fine. Hope so.

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