My First Wasc! Delicious!!!

Decorating By mellee Updated 6 Jun 2009 , 8:32pm by JanH

mellee Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 4:27pm
post #1 of 29

Well, I finally did it. I made the WASC. I'm a champion of doctoring recipes, but I never tried the WASC. Finally, I did it. AND IT WAS FAN-FREAKING-TASTIC!!!! icon_biggrin.gif Here's what I did (for half recipe):

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2322-White-Almond-Sour-Cream-Cake-WASC.html *

*cake mix (store brand)
*3 eggs (extra large)
*1 tsp almond extract (didn't want it too strong)


I mixed this up and measured it. It made 6.5 cups of batter. I put 3.25 cups in each 9 inch round cake pan. I think I baked it for around 40 minutes or so at 325 degrees. I cooled the cake in the pans for 15 minutes, then I turned them out and cooled them on a rack for 10 minutes.

Then I did another first. It was something I learned just recently in another thread (can't remember the members names, sorry!). I wrapped the cakes twice in plastic wrap while still quite warm and then twice in foil. Then I froze them for a week. I heard that freezing is supposed to make cakes moist. I worried about the cakes all week. I thawed them for several hours on the counter unwrapped and then made my cake.

Here's the filling I used:

1 15 oz container whole ricotta (smooth kind, not "deli" kind)
3/4 cup powdered sugar
2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 heaping cup mini semi-sweet chocolate chips.

This made a delicious and thick filling. I love ricotta. I frosted the cake with Indydebi's recipe using the full 1/2 cup of milk and 2 tsp vanilla, 1 tsp butter flavor, 1/2 tsp almond.

Then I did ANOTHER first. icon_biggrin.gif Well, I was never a big cake maker (until I came here, that is), so I've always just frosted and walked away. About 20 minutes after I frosted the cake, I thought, hmmmm I wonder if I can smooth it using the Melvira method? I've never done that before. Well, I didn't have a high-density foam roller, and I didn't have Viva paper towels. Then I remembered someone on here saying they just used plain old white computer/copy paper. So I did that. OMG!! It worked like a charm!! Prettiest, smoothest cake I ever made!

No, I did NOT decorate beyond that. I'm working up to that, LOL! icon_smile.gif I can honestly say that this was a dense, moist, and most delicious cake! It was simply wonderful. Thanks to EVERYONE! I am a WASC convert for LIFE. icon_smile.gif

28 replies
neelycharmed Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 4:35pm
post #2 of 29

Good to know.
I am making my 1st this weekend.
can't wait to try it!
thanks,
Jodi

dutchy1971 Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 4:51pm
post #3 of 29

I made my 1st WASC last weekend I also did the chocolate version. Covert for life now, absolutely delish. Can't wait to make some more in different flavours.

mellee Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 7:55pm
post #4 of 29

Same here, dutchy. The sky's the limit! Neely, you'll love this cake. icon_smile.gif I'm so, so glad I made it. Hmmmm.....there's quite a bit left in the fridge...... icon_biggrin.gif

JanH Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 12:12am
post #5 of 29

mellee, may I ask the source of your WASC recipe?

I only ask because lately there are so many versions appearing I can't keep up... I notice that yours uses less water than Rebecca Sutterby's, and the use of oil indicates it's not kakeladi's original.

Have you made WASC cakes using either of the above recipes? What effect did less water have on the finished cake?

Thanks for your help. icon_smile.gif

mellee Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 1:01am
post #6 of 29

Actually Jan, the source of my WASC is myself, I think. I've read so darn many WASC recipes that my head is spinning too. I think I may have meshed them together in my brain. I added oil and more of it than what most people suggest because many people say the WASC is dry, and the box mix says to add oil, right? So the oil is for the cake mix part. I figure the sour cream will help moisten up the extra sugar and flour, but you still need the oil for the cake mix part. At least that was my figuring. icon_smile.gif Plus flavor and all--the sour cream helps with that. And water? Not sure why I added only 1 cup of water. Guess it sounded like a good idea at the time. The cup of sour cream gave plenty moistness, so 1 cup of water seemed fine. And actually, it WAS a good idea to add only 1 cup because I simply cannot believe how good this cake was! icon_smile.gif I only used 3 eggs because they were extra large, but I think if I had smaller eggs I would have used 4. I should mention that this batter was just slightly thicker than what you'd get from a regular cake mix batter with no extra additions. It seemed a little "gooier" if that makes any sense, lol!

This is the only WASC I've made, Jan, so I can't compare it to others in terms of what more or less water does or any other ingredient for that matter. All I know is that it was divine. Give it a whirl and see what you think! icon_smile.gif I'll tell you one thing: This is DEFINITELY my new recipe for EVER--PERIOD. Thanks for your interest!

Rylan Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 2:01am
post #7 of 29

I love the WASC recipe as well. Jan, I think she used the original recipe with oil added.

JanH Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 2:12am
post #8 of 29

Thanks for responding, mellee. icon_smile.gif Think we'll have to start giving the WASC cake recipes Version numbers (WASC Version 1, etc.) so we can keep them all straight. icon_lol.gif

RylanTy, it sure does sound like the "original" using oil. icon_razz.gifjudge.gif

Have made Rebecca's and kakeladi's and they're both excellent. thumbs_up.gif

Will have to try mellee's version next. birthday.gif

Rylan Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 3:52am
post #9 of 29

Oh yes Jan, I would love to try it as well.

I've heard Kakeladi mentioned that it doesn't make a difference with or without oil. Anyway, I will still try.

mellee Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 10:36am
post #10 of 29

Yes, I think it is basically Kakeladi's recipe with oil. I think I doubled the oil I saw recommended elsewhere. That is, many were recommending 1/4 cup for TWO box mixes, but I used 1/4 cup for ONE box mix. I lessened the flavoring too. Also, I've seen some people say to add 1 cup of sour cream and some say 8 oz of sour cream, using the two interchangeably. While it is true that 1 cup of WATER equals 8 oz, it is not necessarily so for sour cream because it is a bit heavier. So I used 1 cup and not 8 oz. There's not THAT much difference, but there is a small difference. And who knows? It could be the difference between some people having a dry cake and some having a moist cake. Also, I used full fat sour cream. And like I said, if my eggs were regular size, I would have used 4. Jan, you can call this one "Kakeladi with a twist." icon_smile.gif I'm so grateful to Kakeladi for this recipe!

dhccster Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 10:57am
post #11 of 29

I always use kakeladi's original. I love the fact that the cake has no oil in it, that is one of the reasons why this is my favorite. I will have to try this recipe and see if there is a big difference. My cakes have never been dry, but I will experiment to see the difference! Thanks for sharing mellee.

Cake4ever Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 4:07pm
post #12 of 29

You guys are making me feel so lame. icon_cry.gif I tried it, I really did with terrible results.

Next week, I'm really going to try it again. icon_wink.gif

Questions though, why water instead of milk??

Why regular flour and not cake flour??

So that I don't screw up the recipe, I don't want to add the almond, I prefer a vanilla cake, so it's ok to sub for extra vanilla instead??

mellee Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 4:42pm
post #13 of 29

Hi Skis. Try this again. Why water instead of milk? I don't know. Box mixes call for water, so that's what I added. Why regular flour and not cake flour? I don't know. It's cheaper, though. icon_biggrin.gif Try to bake yours at a lower temperature, like maybe 325 or so. And yeah, you can substitute any flavor instead of almond. Also, as you can see above, I froze my cakes while still warm. I was told in another thread that "trick" works like a charm every time to produce a moist cake. And it did! icon_smile.gif I think from now on I will always freeze my cakes. It divides up the work too so you don't feel like you're tied to the kitchen all day. Good luck to you!

saycheese Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 4:57pm
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkisInOkinawa

You guys are making me feel so lame. icon_cry.gif I tried it, I really did with terrible results.

Next week, I'm really going to try it again. icon_wink.gif

Questions though, why water instead of milk??

Why regular flour and not cake flour??

So that I don't screw up the recipe, I don't want to add the almond, I prefer a vanilla cake, so it's ok to sub for extra vanilla instead??




cake flour is not the same as all purpose flour, more proteins or something like that...trust me, it's hard to substitute! icon_cry.gif

I've used just extra vanilla (or any flavor, butter flavor even) and it's really good. And Kakeladi says you can use any liquid:

Quote:
Quote:

*NOTES: *ANY* cake flavor can be used. Some tell me they just dump all ingredients into the bowl together others say they sift all dry ingredients together.
Match the flavoring to the cake flavor such use lemon/almond mix for lemon cake; strawberry for a strawberry cake etc, etc. For most flavors you can use a mixture of vanilla, butter, and almond which is what I do most of the time.
You can use milk, juice, thawed fzn concentrates, soda pop (ie: Coke) cream or just about anything wet for the liquid.




HTH

artscallion Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 5:03pm
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mellee

Also, I've seen some people say to add 1 cup of sour cream and some say 8 oz of sour cream, using the two interchangeably. While it is true that 1 cup of WATER equals 8 oz, it is not necessarily so for sour cream because it is a bit heavier. So I used 1 cup and not 8 oz.



FYI...
When a recipe calls for 8oz of sour cream or 8 oz of water, they are not referring to weight. They are referring to volume and should be measured in a liquid measuring cup, regardless of the weight or density.

heartofoklahoma Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 5:17pm
post #16 of 29

I keep seeing people say they made the WASC cake...........what does that stand for?

Stephi1 Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 5:22pm
post #17 of 29

White Almond Sour Cream Cake, Recipe is on here.

heartofoklahoma Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 5:41pm
post #18 of 29

o ok thank you Stepi1

CarrieBear Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 6:16pm
post #19 of 29

WASC recipe is awesome, I make any and every kind of flavor with this recipe as the base and sub in different flavors and liquids to make all different kinds, the most recent was pina colada, its pretty dang good.
and a friend just made orange dreamsicle and filled it with the ding dong filling and said it was awesome! skys the limit for flavors with this as the base.

mellee Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 11:09pm
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Quote:
Originally Posted by mellee

Also, I've seen some people say to add 1 cup of sour cream and some say 8 oz of sour cream, using the two interchangeably. While it is true that 1 cup of WATER equals 8 oz, it is not necessarily so for sour cream because it is a bit heavier. So I used 1 cup and not 8 oz.


FYI...
When a recipe calls for 8oz of sour cream or 8 oz of water, they are not referring to weight. They are referring to volume and should be measured in a liquid measuring cup, regardless of the weight or density.




Exactly artscallion. That's why I used a 1 cup measure instead of buying an 8 oz container of sour cream. Good for people to know this.

CarrieBear, don't you just LOVE it?? icon_smile.gif

CarrieBear Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 12:00am
post #21 of 29

Its great, basically any flavor or idea you can come up with you can do, there are so many flavoring oils out there like Lorann's and extracts that you can get really creative, and you can subsitute yogurt for sourcream, and just about anyother liquid for the water portion, throw in a dry pack of any flavor pudding, any extract or flavoring oil, any flavor cake mix, ect. posibilities are endless. a friend and i dream up all kinds of crazy flavors all the time and test them out... icon_biggrin.gif

~Carrie

CarrieBear Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 12:04am
post #22 of 29

Just recently made a key lime WASC for one of the cakes on a wedding cake, to die for! the groom said he doesnt even like cake but he loved it!
mmmm icon_razz.gif

Cake4ever Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 8:23am
post #23 of 29

I understand the difference between cake flour and all purpose, but was just curious as to the reason for the AP in this recipe. Has anyone subbed with cake flour instead? I always use warmed whole milk instead of water in my doctored mix recipes.

Does this cake have a flourey taste? I remember when I made mine it was like bread.

For those who get moist results, how does it taste? Is it still doctored box mix texture?

CarrieBear Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 1:57pm
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkisInOkinawa

I understand the difference between cake flour and all purpose, but was just curious as to the reason for the AP in this recipe. Has anyone subbed with cake flour instead? I always use warmed whole milk instead of water in my doctored mix recipes.

Does this cake have a flourey taste? I remember when I made mine it was like bread.

For those who get moist results, how does it taste? Is it still doctored box mix texture?





I use cake flour in my WASC's for my cakes, I have been using cakeflour in my wasc cupcakes but think I might try AP because in a cupcake they seem really heavy, and in a cupcake I would like them to be a little lighter but Cakeflour is great in wascs for a really dense cake that is great for stacking or carving.

mellee Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 1:58pm
post #25 of 29

Skis, I really don't know. I've heard some people DO use cake flour though. Use it if you want. I'll use the AP because it's cheaper, but that's just me. I'm sure warmed whole milk will be fine and will add a bit of richness to the recipe. I might try that myself next time.

As for a floury taste, well, mine wasn't like bread, but it wasn't like a box mix texture either. It was heavier and denser than a box mix, somewhat more floury I guess but not like bread. Straight box mix is very "airy" and structureless, which is fine at times if you don't mind that. Sometimes I like it myself. I just found the WASC to be richer in taste and texture. I loved the taste, and the possibilities for different flavors are endless. It's really all I'm going to use from now on. Hope this helps! icon_smile.gif

CarrieBear Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 5:57pm
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieBear

Just recently made a key lime WASC for one of the cakes on a wedding cake, to die for! the groom said he doesnt even like cake but he loved it!
mmmm icon_razz.gif





this is the recipe I used for those interested
If I am not making a large cake I cut the wasc recipes in half that call for 2 cake mixes other wise it makes a huge amount of batter
~Carrie

Key Lime (Macsmoms recipe)

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-615872-lime.html *

*I used bottled lime juice.

SharonK1973 Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 6:20pm
post #27 of 29

Thanks Carrie! I'll be giving that a try soon! Thanks for the PM too! Really appreciate it!

JanH Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 8:16pm
post #28 of 29

This reminds me of the joke that starts off...

Question: Which weighs more, a ton of bricks or a ton of feathers?

Without thinking, most would reply "bricks" because everyone knows they're heavier than feathers.

Answer: They both weigh the same because a ton is a ton!

Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion


FYI...
When a recipe calls for 8oz of sour cream or 8 oz of water, they are not referring to weight.




8 oz. is always 8 oz. and it definitely IS a measurement by weight.

U.S. manufacturers produce sour cream in 8 oz. and 16 oz. containers for the retail market as well as bulk for wholesale.

So all you need do is use one 8 oz. container or 1/2 a 16 oz. container of sour cream for this recipe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

They are referring to volume and should be measured in a liquid measuring cup, regardless of the weight or density.




This recipe also gives the alternative measurement of one cup of sour cream (8.5 oz.) which is a measurement of volume (not weight of ingredient). This option is for use by bakers who buy sour cream in bulk but don't have a scale.

If the recipe were only written: 8.5 oz. of sour cream only bakers with scales could easily portion out that amount.

Most U.S. recipes are written in volume measurements or a combination of volume and (usually convenient) weight (or even packaging portions). Since most recipes are regionalized, the weight amounts given are commonly for products that are packaged in those amounts.

In addition to the 8 oz. container of sour cream, butter is also measured by volume, weight or packaging portions in recipes, i.e., 1/2 cup, 4 oz. or 1 stick. And then there's the 3 or 8 oz. brick of cream cheese....

(Guess we're pretty laid back..)*

Since baking is a science, it's always more accurate to use weight measurements in a recipe. However, if you don't have a scale, it's fine to use the alternative volume measurement given in the recipe.

However, you can't easily convert weight measurements to volume without help. Either the recipe author will give you the equivalent or you'll need to use weight to volume conversion charts. And I don't even want to go there.

For interesting discussions of weight and volume measurments:

http://tinyurl.com/oaqbky

http://tinyurl.com/r3l7oa

* http://tinyurl.com/qvzf5t

HTH

JanH Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 8:32pm
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieBear

I use cake flour in my WASC's for my cakes, I have been using cakeflour in my wasc cupcakes but think I might try AP because in a cupcake they seem really heavy, and in a cupcake I would like them to be a little lighter




You shouldn't be substituting AP or cake flour 1:1. (A cup of AP weighs more than a cup of cake flour.)*

Handy baking ingredients substitution chart:

http://www.joyofbaking.com/IngredientSubstitution.html

(When substituting AP for cake flour, I use the substitution that includes cornstarch.)

*Sorry I can't provide the appropriate link that binder has been packed up for our move.

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