Red Food Coloring And Kids

Decorating By rexygirlcookies Updated 11 Jun 2009 , 5:02am by emlashlee

rexygirlcookies Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 2:53am
post #1 of 52

I had a client ask if it was safe to use red food coloring for her kids birthday party cake. She said at a few kids parties the moms have discussed problems with kids eating things containing red food coloring. I am new to decorating and have never been asked this before. I googled red food coloring problems and found some articles about hyperactivity in kids who eat too much red food coloring. Has anyone ever been asked about this before? We are doing a beach themed cake with all kinds of beach toys, I can avoid some red, but kinda anoying, lol! What would you do?

51 replies
scoobydid Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 3:06am
post #2 of 52

I don't think the FDA would have approved it if it wasn't safe. Now, whether or not it creates a negative reaction in children, well, it may be valid. I would take the client's sensitivity to the red into consideration when doing your design. Perhaps you can do some fondant accent pieces as opposed to a giant red crab, for example. Your job is to make a great looking and great tasting cake. You're not in business to police what these kids eat and what they shouldn't eat. If they have issues after eating products with red dye, they have parents who will just have to step up and well, parent.

A beach theme sounds like fun! So many possibilities. Enjoy.

aliciag829 Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 3:19am
post #3 of 52

I have an acquaintance who claims to have an allergy to red food coloring, so maybe this so called allergy is what causes the hyperactivity. I find it hard to believe that these parents really forbid their children from eating ANYTHING colored red. Think of how hard that would be to avoid! I don't think eating red at one party is going to hurt them! If kids can't splurge and eat junk at a party, what kind of party is that anyway? BOR-ING!! I would tell her not to worry and nothing has been scientifically proven as of yet, right? It's probably all a hypothesis.

Texas_Rose Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 3:23am
post #4 of 52

I remember when they made a big deal about it in the 80's...I remember them taking the red stripe out of Aquafresh kids toothpaste icon_biggrin.gif I thought it had been proven that it didn't really affect most kids...maybe one in 100 was sensitive to it.

I would say that eating it for a special occasion, like a cake, wouldn't be that big of a deal to most moms. Giving it to kids in the Koolaid they drink every day might do something (although my kids drink red koolaid and eat red jello and they're not any worse than usual).

Anyhow, you might avoid it for a customer's specific request...but it's not a big enough deal to quit using it all together.

rexygirlcookies Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 3:27am
post #5 of 52

I felt the same way, like really one slice of cake with a little red on it, but hey they're not my kids! And after the few articles I read red food coloring is in like EVERYTHING, but figured some of you smart cakers may have come across this before!!

funcakes Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 3:30am
post #6 of 52

I think some kids may have a sensitivity to the red food coloring. If it caused any long term effects I am sure it would not have been approved by the FDA. I guess it is more like having too much caffeine.
My grandson had a fire truck cake for his third birthday. My daughter claimed that the red frosting would cause him to go hyper and sure enough a few minutes after eating it, he just started to bounce around-and he is a really mellow kid. 20 minutes later-totally back to normal.

Christen99 Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 3:37am
post #7 of 52

It is very common for children to have issues with red food coloring, much more common than most people realize. My oldest child had several severe food allergies, and he was extremely sensitive to food colorings, high fructose corn syrup (he had a corn allergy), and food additives. My youngest didn't seem to have food allergies, but was also very sensitive to red coloring, food additivies, and corn syrup as well. Both boys ate very natural, basic foods (chicken, rice, fruits/veggies, etc.) and to this day they LOVE healthy foods.

yamber82 Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 3:48am
post #8 of 52

it's possible for a person to be allergic to just about anything really. it may not be very common but ya know, some kids are more sensitive than others etc. i would ask her if her kids already have any known allergies first. and another thing, i'm pretty sure lots of stuff has red food color. even things that arn't red since that is a primary color. like someone else said, it is pretty near impossible to avoid read food color all together. if it is a concern of hers i would just try to avoid it anyways

mcaulir Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 4:28am
post #9 of 52

I have a cousin who was very sensitive to yellow food colouring as a child, and would become very aggravated if she had eaten it. She had been medically tested and found to be sensitive to particular substances in many foods, even many fruits and veges, not just the artificial stuff.

I think unless the child has been tested and found to be sensitive, they'll probably be fine.

madgeowens Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 6:49am
post #10 of 52

Actually, a person can live to be 40 0r 50 years old and never have any allergies and then all of a sudden bang they have a reaction to something have been around all their life with no reaction. You never know what it might be, so I hardly think you can give any kind of guarantee someone will not have allergic reaction or just become hyperactive (from the sugar)shhhhhh......So basically its a crap shoot

Evoir Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 7:13am
post #11 of 52

In your shoes I would use red for several accents on the cake, eg a red and white beach ball or umbrella, and either:
a. Tell the host to remove these modeled pieces before serving, or
b. use 100% nastural food-derivved colourings, which are available most places. You might not get quite the intensity you are used to, but it could solve your problem.

Personally, I would do option a. Parental supervision and responsibility has to start somewhere!

sara91 Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 7:45am
post #12 of 52
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I can avoid some red, but kinda anoying, lol!




Not as annoying as trying to calm a hyperactive child because the decorator has thought the cake looks pretty with all the artificial colour.

My child is very sensitive to colours and a small amount will have him climbing the walls, to the point where he becomes hysterical. It really is not very pleasant.

In the UK they are phasing out by the end of this year, many of the food colours that they have proven to cause behavoural problems in children.

You can find plenty of info on the harmful effects of feeding our children colours.

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If it caused any long term effects I am sure it would not have been approved by the FDA




Americolor and other products contain ingredients that cannot be sold in many countries. They are phasing out many colours in the UK in 2009 as they have found them unsafe and NOT recommended for children. These include Yellow 6, Yellow 13, Red 3, Red 40, Yellow 5.



Bakers and decorators should be responsible in their use of food colour in regards to children and factor that into their cake decorating.

The above colours have been found to cause behavourial problems in children and we should think about what we put into their bodies.

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If they have issues after eating products with red dye, they have parents who will just have to step up and well, parent.



Yeah great advice, icon_eek.gif HOw about you just don't feed my kid crap in the first place.

Evoir you have given very good advice with decorations that can be removed. This is very sensible and is a win win situation. Natural colours can be difficult to get a nice red. I have had much luck with natural pink made from beet that gives a great vibrant pink.

khkakes Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 11:53am
post #13 of 52

I have to agree with Sara91. I have seen children who were sensitive/allergic to food dyes and additives. They are so hyper it is horrible to see and the uninformed parent will often be tempted to use ADD or ADHD drugs when just removing the additives and food dyes from their diets is more effective.

Please remember that we are talking about a children's birthday party. My son is allergic to alot of the ingredients that are in a cake and to tell him that all of the other kids can have the pretty fun cake but sorry he can't is heart breaking. He's the reason I started decorating cakes - so I didn't have to disappoint him at every party we ever went to.

So before you just carelessly say too bad let the parents be parents think about the disappointment and sadness you may cause a child.

4rays2hunny_bunnies2 Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 11:55am
post #14 of 52

I am highly allergic to the red dyes. My daughter does not get anything with red dye in it. IMO as a cake decorator we have to respect the client's wishes. Oh I know sometimes it can get very upsetting and almost aggrevating but the client does come first. I mean where would any of us be without the clients. There are actual true cases of allergies to red dye, not hyperactivity, but hives, throat swelling and the like. I am not trying to offend anyone but this is my opinion.

drakegore Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 12:08pm
post #15 of 52

my best friend's son, who is a wonderfully behaved and calm little guy, gets hyperactive and inattentive when eats food coloring, especially red. she works very hard to find him treats and good things to eat so he never feels like he's missing out on things that other kids get but it can be very difficult.

the dye is like a trigger and no amount of good parenting can overcome a physical response to the dye. he even knows he is behaving poorly and feels awful about it but he cannot calm down.
he is 6 and will refuse food he knows has dyes in it because he doesn't want to feel the way they make him feel...for a 6 year old to turn down candy and cake, tells you something about how awful it makes him feel.

funcakes Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 10:42pm
post #16 of 52

Just had to add, yes removing artificial flavorings and colors is a great thing to do, and if a child is sensitive to them it will change their behavior. Yet, many ADD people are not reacting to these, but have one of several other causes. Medication may be over used but I would hate to have parents feel bad if they have to medicate their child. Changing diets does not cure everything.

Some of the comments are a little harsh IMHO. I think it is different if the child is 3 or if the child is 13. No, I can't have cake at 3 is a little sad for the kid, but at older ages-maybe it just could build character! My daughter can not eat cake, but never felt bad for herself. "Hey, I can't have cake, big deal. At the hospital where I volunteer there is a little girl who can't eat food! She has a feeding tube." is what she always focused on.

Consideration on both sides would be great. Trying to provide food that is safe for everyone is a goal, but almost impossible these days. Not being able to eat something served and NOT making a fuss-PRICELESS!

The above comment is not directed at anyone that has posted here. It is a vent because our annual first grade picnic is cancelled. Five classes of kids can't have the event because a mom of a child with numerous food allergies made a huge fuss about every suggestion of food to be served at the picnic. She refused to send in safe food for her own son, because he would feel bad not having what his friends had. That wouldn't be FAIR to him. So, now no one has a picnic. The kids will miss a picnic, but unfortunately her son will miss a lesson on learning to be happy for others and to be generous of spirit.

cheatize Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 10:55pm
post #17 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by rexygirlcookies

I had a client ask if it was safe to use red food coloring for her kids birthday party cake. She said at a few kids parties the moms have discussed problems with kids eating things containing red food coloring. I am new to decorating and have never been asked this before. I googled red food coloring problems and found some articles about hyperactivity in kids who eat too much red food coloring. Has anyone ever been asked about this before? We are doing a beach themed cake with all kinds of beach toys, I can avoid some red, but kinda anoying, lol! What would you do?




It sounds to me like the answer to "what to do" is to discuss this further with your client. Perhaps the moms were talking in general and not about any of the children they know. If the client is uncomfortable with it, then I would find a way to not use it, use it for removable items, or use natural dye. However, if you only tell the client to remove those items, what happens if she forgets? Birthday parties can be pretty hectic for everyone.

-K8memphis Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 11:04pm
post #18 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by funcakes

Just had to add, yes removing artificial flavorings and colors is a great thing to do, and if a child is sensitive to them it will change their behavior. Yet, many ADD people are not reacting to these, but have one of several other causes. Medication may be over used but I would hate to have parents feel bad if they have to medicate their child. Changing diets does not cure everything.

Some of the comments are a little harsh IMHO. I think it is different if the child is 3 or if the child is 13. No, I can't have cake at 3 is a little sad for the kid, but at older ages-maybe it just could build character! My daughter can not eat cake, but never felt bad for herself. "Hey, I can't have cake, big deal. At the hospital where I volunteer there is a little girl who can't eat food! She has a feeding tube." is what she always focused on.

Consideration on both sides would be great. Trying to provide food that is safe for everyone is a goal, but almost impossible these days. Not being able to eat something served and NOT making a fuss-PRICELESS!

The above comment is not directed at anyone that has posted here. It is a vent because our annual first grade picnic is cancelled. Five classes of kids can't have the event because a mom of a child with numerous food allergies made a huge fuss about every suggestion of food to be served at the picnic. She refused to send in safe food for her own son, because he would feel bad not having what his friends had. That wouldn't be FAIR to him. So, now no one has a picnic. The kids will miss a picnic, but unfortunately her son will miss a lesson on learning to be happy for others and to be generous of spirit.




I had my boy, who is ADHD, on the elimination diet and he was sensitive to red dye and certain salicylates. It is very difficult. I would never even think to try to dominate anyone's menu like that for the sake of my child.

Interesting thing is he would be worse hyper the second and third days after eating enough of something 'wrong' for him. But often he could one serving and he'd be ok--if he got more, forget about it.

It's an incredible balancing act--it's very difficult but I kept his little butt off the adhd drugs and he's over 6'4"--the drugs can potentially stunt their growth. More power to all the families of adhd and it's their personal choce to use the meds or not. That was my choice.

However I quietly went insane and could use some serious long term medication. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Hey I saw a candy cane this year that used beet color for the red.

Oh and at that time there were no uncolored medications--antibiotics, cough syrup, everything for kids was colored with food dye back them.

ajjhmf Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 2:18am
post #19 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by funcakes

The above comment is not directed at anyone that has posted here. It is a vent because our annual first grade picnic is cancelled. Five classes of kids can't have the event because a mom of a child with numerous food allergies made a huge fuss about every suggestion of food to be served at the picnic. She refused to send in safe food for her own son, because he would feel bad not having what his friends had. That wouldn't be FAIR to him. So, now no one has a picnic. The kids will miss a picnic, but unfortunately her son will miss a lesson on learning to be happy for others and to be generous of spirit.




Just for some perspective on this.

My son was in a class this year with a child allergic to nuts, dairy and eggs. If he TOUCHED even the slightest amount of any of these items, he broke into a serious rash. If he had too much contact, or accidentally ate something, he went into anaphylactic shock. The teachers had to be trained to use the Epi-pen and carry it with them. We have to sign an agreement that we would avoid feeding out children allergen containing food in the clothes they were wearing to class. All the kids had their hand and faces washed when they got there.

Before I met Jacob and his family, I thought food allergies were annoying to other parents and kids. But now I realize that they are many times a case of life or death. At a five class party, I would imagine it would be very, very hard to keep a first grader away from any possible allergens. I don't think the mom was wrong at all for asking that the food at the party be allergy safe. If the school can't be bothered to keep one child safe, then they should cancel the party. JMHO

rexygirlcookies Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 5:17am
post #20 of 52

Well I talked more to the mom and her kids have no known allergies the subject of red food dye came up with a few other moms and she was more curious if I knew anything about it. I told her to google it as i did and read the research I found and gave her an overview of all of your comments. We decided to keep the red minimum to be safe for all the other kiddies coming to the party, but she still wants a few decorations that we couldn't leave the red out in, but it was her decision and she said she would be responsible for taking them off before serving the cake, they'll be made out of gumpaste and i told her that no one will really want to eat them any how. I appreciate everyones comments, I suppose it's best to play it safe with soo many allergies out there, and especially when children are involved, I was just curious if anyone else had a client ask about this before.

Evoir Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 5:32am
post #21 of 52

Good of you to check it out well in advance! You are a responsible cake decorator icon_smile.gif

Rylan Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 12:28pm
post #22 of 52

This is an interesting topic about food coloring.

Btw, my STBDH (STB=soon to be) mentioned that some red food coloring comes from beetles. I didn't believe him until I researched it online. I wonder.

Evoir Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 12:32pm
post #23 of 52

That would be cochineal. And interestingly, even though its not synthetic, there are still people who are allergic to it.

jonahsmom Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 1:03pm
post #24 of 52

I don't think it's something to change based on someone reading something somewhere that said it was bad, but if they've noticed their child climbing right up a wall after eating it I would say their child definitely has an intolerance to that food. It doesn't necessarily mean it's an allergy, but it is an intolerance.

Scoobydid....Chances are if a parent has a child with issues regarding red dye or other food intolerances they are already, well, parenting. My son is GFCF and if he eats anything with gluten or casein in it he goes batsh*t!!!! He's not allergic to gluten or casein per se, but he definitely has an intolerance for it!!!

That said, he is five and has been on the diet for about 9-10 months. He has never been bothered when other kids are eating different foods around him because he knows that this diet makes him feel better and he is better able to focus. Because it's not a life-threatening allergy (like peanuts or even strawberries are for some children) we don't have to worry as much about what the other kids are eating. I'm sure if it would cause him to have a scary reaction we would be having a different conversation right now. I've seen kids offer him candy on the playground at the park and he just says, "No, I can't have that!" He's a great kid....but I'm not giving him something he can react to because it totally changes his personality!!!

Sure, we still had to put him on Prozac for his aggressive tendencies (which are pretty much gone with the Prozac...YEAH!!!!) I think that medication is FAR overused when you can change the environment your child is in. BUT when the environmental, food, etc changes only get you so far, you have to look into a way to medically treat the issues. That's why it took us a good 2 yrs of trial and error with diet, supplements, etc before we finally broke down and put him on medication.

Funcakes....at first I was totally ticked at that mom for not even offering to send food appropriate for her child. I've done that the entire time Jo's been on the GFCF diet!!! I've had his teacher call the night before a pizza party and have made his GFCF pizza so that he can have something similar and be able to enjoy the party. But, then I decided that I could see the other side of actually having a child with severe allergy. Was it that severe of a food allergy? If so, I see why the school decided to cancel. If not, I think it should've been up to mom to take the reins so her son could enjoy the picnic and learn to cope with the cards he's been dealt. My guess is that it was NOT a life-threatening allergy or precautions would've had to be taken all year long with the other children's food as well.

sara91 Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 6:23pm
post #25 of 52

Mums have to look out for their own childrens safety. Sometimes they may seem selfish where the other children are concerned.

My children are my number one priority.

My old school a year 7 pupil died from being fed peanut butter at a school camp. Very very sad.

It can be boring making sure our food is safe. But for some parents what a nightmare it would be to make sure your child leads a normal life but stays safe.

Evoir Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 12:52am
post #26 of 52

I was thinking about this thread, and also another one about alcohol in cakes (and the idea there may be a recovering alcoholic attending a party) and was wondering whether the best solution is simply to print out a sheet with the list of ingredients on it, and let the guests or parents of guests figure it out for themselves. You can place the sheet under the cake tray, and if someone asks the host "Does this have soy lecithin/eggs/milk/nuts/whatever in it", they can answer authoritatively.

Legally, you are covering yourself completely, and it allows for every single allergy/intolerance sufferer to check for themselves whether something is safe (for them or their child) or not.

I have always done this with orders outside the family (because I know my family has no allergies etc), and while most people are surprised and say it not really necessary, they do appreciate the thorough approach.

HTH!

Doug Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 1:12am
post #27 of 52

News Flash -- YOUR kid is NOT the only kid in the world.


What a selfish momzilla to ruin the party for five classes (what about 100 students?) because she thinks her son is the ONLY ONE IN THE WHOLE FREAKIN' WORLD AND ALLLLLLLLLLL MUST ACCOMMODATE HIM!

well -- guess what, eventually, the world WON'T -- and he'll have to just MAKE DO.

she IS raising a child sure to grow up spoiled and selfish beyond dealing with.

As long as we continue to kowtow to outrageous demands for individual accommodation that brush aside and impinge upon the rights and privileges of others, we cannot complain about bridezillas, groomzillas, momzillas or nay such -zilla ilk. We have made them by bowing to their demands, worrying more about their individual self-esteem than seeing to it they toughin' up and learn to deal with it rather than being assuaged, and running -- tail between legs -- to cater to their every whim instead of standing up and letting the caterwaul all they want in response to firm NO, we won't bow to your demands.


My recent generic contract posting is but an indication of far we now have to go to say NO and make sure you CYT (cover our tookie)!


as one fighting this on a daily basis as a teacher at the high school level -- oh, the mess we're going to be in as the years progress.

sara91 Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 7:04am
post #28 of 52

Sure there are some momzillas out there who don't care for any other childrens feelings but there own. While I am protective of my own I also want them to be ready for the real world and not spoilt brats. Sometimes they just have to miss out if the food is unsuitable. Sure there are tantrums, but they will get over it. (i hate shopping with small children, sorry really off track now)


If you are having a picnic/party though you should make the food (a serving of food) suitable for your guest. If this person has allergies, intolerances, religious beliefs, ethical beliefs etc.

We don't invite vegetarians to parties and tell them to bring their own food because it would spoil everyone elses fun. We have a vegetarian option for them that is served.

What a lovely teacher making the gluten free pizza for the student!

Good idea about the list of ingredients, we all have to cover ourselves. You can also put storage and serving info on the sheet to make it more useful.

Many people don't have a clue with these last two.

khkakes Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 12:31pm
post #29 of 52

I was going to stay out of this post after my orginal reply but find myself unable to resist now.

I think the OP was simply asking if anyone had heard about this sensitivity/allergy to food dye. Yes many of us had and there were great options offered to make this less of an issue for the party host. Its our job to work with our clients to make sure we produce a product that meets the needs of the purchaser. If you can't/don't want to produce your product to the clients specifications don't do it.

I would like to add a few things for all of you to think about. What would you do if you were in a non-smoking restaurant and someone lit a cigarette? Many (not all) of you would insist that the cigarette be put out andpossibly ask that the offender be escorted from the restaurant. Why? We're concerned that the cigarette smoke will cause long term damage to our health. We're saying that our long term health is more important than that person's right to smoke. Do we go around screaming that the person that requested the cigarette to be put out is selfish or tell them to just stay home - no we call him a hero for standing up to the selfish smoker.

Now shift you focus to the parent of a child who is highly allergic to peanuts, dairy or eggs or another food. Coming into contact with these foods will cause possible death. Everyday you have to send them into an environment where you have no control over what the child next to them ate for breakfast or has in their lunch. Does it make the parent a bit nuts - absolutely but they take a deep breath and send that child every day. Do they sometimes go over board in trying to protect their child? You bet but look at the alternative they are facing - life without their child. It's not that the food in question might someday hurt their child it will absolutely cause illness and in some cases death. Will these children grow up spoiled, maybe but at least they grow up. Now think about your "right" to send a peanut butter sandwich to school with your child. Do you really think your "right" to the peanut butter sandwich is worth more than a child's life?

I know many of you won't agree with me and I'm sorry for highjacking this thread to share my opinion. I'm just suprised and confused everytime I hear people discuss this.

-K8memphis Posted 6 Jun 2009 , 1:33pm
post #30 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by khkakes

I was going to stay out of this post after my orginal reply but find myself unable to resist now.

I think the OP was simply asking if anyone had heard about this sensitivity/allergy to food dye. Yes many of us had and there were great options offered to make this less of an issue for the party host. Its our job to work with our clients to make sure we produce a product that meets the needs of the purchaser. If you can't/don't want to produce your product to the clients specifications don't do it.

I would like to add a few things for all of you to think about. What would you do if you were in a non-smoking restaurant and someone lit a cigarette? Many (not all) of you would insist that the cigarette be put out andpossibly ask that the offender be escorted from the restaurant. Why? We're concerned that the cigarette smoke will cause long term damage to our health. We're saying that our long term health is more important than that person's right to smoke. Do we go around screaming that the person that requested the cigarette to be put out is selfish or tell them to just stay home - no we call him a hero for standing up to the selfish smoker.

Now shift you focus to the parent of a child who is highly allergic to peanuts, dairy or eggs or another food. Coming into contact with these foods will cause possible death. Everyday you have to send them into an environment where you have no control over what the child next to them ate for breakfast or has in their lunch. Does it make the parent a bit nuts - absolutely but they take a deep breath and send that child every day. Do they sometimes go over board in trying to protect their child? You bet but look at the alternative they are facing - life without their child. It's not that the food in question might someday hurt their child it will absolutely cause illness and in some cases death. Will these children grow up spoiled, maybe but at least they grow up. Now think about your "right" to send a peanut butter sandwich to school with your child. Do you really think your "right" to the peanut butter sandwich is worth more than a child's life?

I know many of you won't agree with me and I'm sorry for highjacking this thread to share my opinion. I'm just suprised and confused everytime I hear people discuss this.




The majority of the allergy sufferers are not in this extreme condition.

The people that get on my nerves the most are the ones who want me to change up my ingredients to make it ok for their child. Then they can annouce, this is ____ (peanut, wheat, egg, etc. pick one) free. When I am not equipped to crown myself ____(peanut, wheat, egg, etc. pick one) free. That's a ginormous fool hearty risk for everyone. In my book it's stupid to subject a kid to that.

They say well I will be the judge of what my child can or cannot have. And I'm like sure you can but not at my expense. It can't be good enough for your peanut sensitive child without it being pure enough for the one that will die from it. I will never certify my baking to be that pure unless it is. I'll never sell peanut free unless I can make it in a laboratory under the most careful conditions.

When my child was allergic to certain foods I did not impose on anyone. I did for my kid or he did without whatver it was being offered. My point is that if my child was so allergic for it to be life threatening (and he was not thank God) I would never trust anyone to feed him anything--hello-o.

I would not push people to dance to my tune and hope that everybody complied 'cause otherwise whoopsy let's whip out the epi pen again. It is simply beyond absurd and terribly reckless to think that people can comply with someone's life and death eating allergy.

A certain population of Mom's of allergy sufferers are so over bearing about this (everybody doing it their way) that it has made me rarely take into account anyone's special needs--I just say sorry I don't do that.

And just as an aside, few if any people died on the spot from someone else smoking a cigarette--no one should be tossed out for lighting up--the whistle blower would not be my hero and I do not smoke. I don't think smokers are selfish--I think they are as free as me. I'm into personal freedom. Although I would not be happy for anyone to smoke near me inside--it's a mild infraction.

But your example I think is very weak to transfer over to the most extremely allergic and all the responsibilities therein.

Just my thoughts.

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