Tell Me More! Silly Beginners Questions..any Help Is Welcome

Decorating By GoldenLeo Updated 22 Jun 2009 , 8:45pm by GoldenLeo

GoldenLeo Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 6:19pm
post #1 of 17

Hi to you all!
I wanted to try out fondant for years.... Unfortunately, here where I live it is huge problem to get ingredients. I still miss important ingredients but now I determent to find them! (white marshmallows, glucose, that gum for gum paste, basicly I have water, sugar and glycerin- but I will get them somehow ) icon_lol.gif
I'm determent to make my niece 8th b-day cake.
I would like it to be 2 tier simple cake, covered with fondant and with little bugs and flowers.
My head is spining from questions and all the recipes, now I'm more confused than in start.
Please help me with tips! I really want this to work and I have only 3 weeks to "mater".
First question - which fondant is easier to make/work with - MMF or that one with glucose/corn syrup and glycerin? (for beginners like me)
Second - what kind of filling I'm allowed to use in fondant cake? I think I have read somewhere that fruit is out of the question. So could you recommend me something for children?
Third - I understood that butter cream goes under the fondant, is it tasty? Maybe some good recipe?
Forth - I have read that I need "supporters" for the second tier. I'm a bit confused about that, are few straws enough or I put some kind of "plate" between the tiers?
I know I'm stupid and full of stupid questions....
But I would really, really like to learn this....
And I apologize, english is not my first language so there are lots of mistakes...
Big thank you!

16 replies
jardot22 Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 6:59pm
post #2 of 17

Hi, and welcome! As far as which fondant to use, MMF requires simple ingredients, but in my opinion, Michele Fosters fondant is easier to work with - it kneads more easily, especially when adding color. I would recommend it over MMF, but MMF would also work just fine. Second, you can pretty much use any filling you want, but keep in mind that you should put a thick "dam" around the filling to keep it from seeping out and getting into your buttercream. Also keep in mind that if are using a filling that needs refrigeration, some fondant doens't handle well in the fridge (such as MMF). Thirdly, buttercream does go under the fondant, and it is very tasty. There are tons of good recipes on here for buttercream - I personally use SugarShack's recipe and love it, but I started out using Wilton's recipe and it worked just fine and crusted well for smoothing. Fourth, the second tier should always be supported by straws, dowels, bubble tea straws, pillars, or some other type of support system that you stick into the bottom tier. Also the second tier should always be on it's own cake board or plate so that the dowels (or whatever you are using) have something to hold up. Wilton has a couple different kinds for this purpose. I hope this helps! I know how many questions I had at the beginning, so you are on the right track! Good luck!

KonfectionKonnection Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 7:06pm
post #3 of 17

Hello! I think you have very good questions, ones that most beginners ask.

1. Between MMF and Michelle Foster's (the one with glycerin and syrup, that I think you mean)--I found Michelle's to be tastier and easier to work with. They are both good--so you may just need to make the one you can find all the ingredients for. (Both were easier to make than I expected the first time.)

2. It's best not to refrigerate fondant cakes, although you can if you have to. It can make moisture form causing decorations to droop or colors to run. That's why it is best to avoid fruit for a filling, but to use something that can be left sitting out. You can use frosting as a filling, or you can get pre-made pudding at the grocery store that doesn't need refrigeration. I just usually use my icing.

3. Yes, you need to ice your cake before putting fondant on. There are a lot of good recipes for buttercream on this site. The icing "glues" the fondant on the cake.

4. Supports keep the top cake from crushing the bottom cake. Ice and cover the larger cake, then cut supports the height of the cake (heavy straws or wooden dowels) to stick in the cake. The small (top) tier sits on a cardboard circle that is the same size as the cake. This way, the supports push against cardboard, and can't work thru the top cake.

I hope this helps, and isn't confusing! Good luck!

ljdills Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 7:08pm
post #4 of 17

First let me say WELCOME !! If you want to learn you are at the right place. I have learned more on CC than any class I've ever taken.
A big advantage to MMF is that it is very inexpensive to make. If you are just practicing purchasing fondant can be expensive. I would say, however, if you have never used fondant at all then you will want to start out with purchased fondant so you will know the texture and everything to look and feel for when you do make your own.
Most importantly have fun !
Good luck !

Rylan Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 9:07pm
post #5 of 17

WELCOME TO CC!
I'm glad that after all the years, you have decided to make your very first fondant cake. I totally know how you feel, I just want to let you know that if things don't work out right, never give up because it take time and practice -- plus there are many ways to do things.

If you are not yet comfortable with scratch recipes, I would suggest you try kakeladi's original WASC recipe. It starts with a box mix and you just add a few things. It can also be done in many flavors.

1. I personally have no experience making fondant since I buy mines ( I use Satin Ice). But for future projects, I would suggest you get Jennifer Dontz's dvd to get her semi homemade fondant recipe. If you are not familiar with fondant, I would also suggest you try out ready made fondant so you can familiarize yourself with the consistency.

2. You can definitely use fruits as fillings such as strawberries. Buttercream is the most common filling I know of, it can be flavored and you can also add different things in it such as jam, cream cheese, cookies, etc. Always check which fillings require refrigeration. There are diffent types of fillings out there... from custard to ganache. Oh and don't forget to always pipe a dam.

3. Yes buttercream can be used under fondant and yummy if you have the right recipe. Try Indydebi's recipe since it is good and Crisco is usually available

4. Always use something sturdy (such as covered cardboard) in between tiers. I would also suggest you use bubble tea straws or wooden dowels. It will support the weight of the top tier.

PM me if you have any questions, we might have the same language. Also, check out youtube videos, it is a lot easier to see things visually.

Good luck.

jenng1482 Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 9:54pm
post #6 of 17

I am fairly new to this also. I saw "bubble tea straws" mentioned a few times. Pardon my ignorance, but what is that?

Rylan Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 12:04am
post #7 of 17

Bubble tea straws are the thick straws usually used in tapioca drinks and thick drinks such as milkshakes.

duckgirl Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 8:48am
post #8 of 17

Another total newbie here. I like decorating cakes, but have never used any fancy things to do it with. I'm lost with some of the terms I see used on this site, so if someone would be so kind as to tell me what these things are, I'd really appreciate it! What does "fbct" stand for? My daughter made a guess of "fondant buttercream transfer". No idea if she's right though. I don't know what gumpaste is or how it is made or used other than I see figures made from it. All of these terms are like another language, lol. I've always just used regular frosting from the store and then use Wilton colors and frosting bags and tips. I've made some cute flat characters on a regular 9 x 13 cake, but all out of the same frosting type, just colored. I'm looking at the Tinkerbell cakes here tonight seeing if I want to brave my first attempt at something a little "more" for my daughter's bday party this Sat. She turned 9 about a week & 1/2 ago.

Any help with all these initials being used around here would sure help! Thanks!!

Rylan Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 11:47am
post #9 of 17

Hi duckgirl, FBCT stands for Frozen Buttercream Transfer. She got it partially right =]. Gumpaste can be made using different recipes. There are also mixes to make it as well as ready made ones. You can also turn your fondant into gumpaste by adding tylose powder. It can be formed freehand or with different tools.

Here is a link to decode acronyms: http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-2926-.html

Good luck and I hope she enjoys her birthday.

GoldenLeo Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 12:30pm
post #10 of 17

Thank you all for the answers... It got a bit clearer! You are really wonderful people!!
So, definitely supporters and butter cream, and fruit friendly cake.

I think for probe I will try to make myself fondant and if it doesn't work, I'll buy some for the actual cake. I arranged all of my friends across the country to search for ingredients, I think I will be able to find white marshmallows and one very kind lady said she'll send me some glucose.
I hate this, here you can't find anything, and IF you find it, it is much more expensive.
I looked at your prices in USA, for example - one mold is 10-20 dollars and here is the same mold about 70-80.

Oh, I have one more technical question - when to make it all?
Is it ok to make cake day before - cool it, then cover it with butter cream- and leave it in fridge till tomorrow? And then tomorrow cover it with fondant and figurines. (On consuming day icon_smile.gif) And how long can figurines hold? Since I would like to make them few days before - I doubt I will succeed first time...

TooMuchCake Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 4:04pm
post #11 of 17

Hi!

I think you've probably already gotten the answers you need, but I would rather have Michele Foster's fondant any day of the week rather than marshmallow fondant. icon_smile.gif

I have a tutorial up on my website that shows stacking a cake with bubble tea straws and a cake board between the layers, in case you're a visual person and would be helped by seeing it:
http://www.cakedalaska.com/Caked_Alaska/Welcoming_William.html

Yes, making your cake the day before and putting the buttercream on, and then covering it in fondant the next day is fine. You may need to add a little piping gel (if you have it) to the cake before adding the fondant or a TINY spritz of water over the crusted buttercream to help the fondant adhere.

Deanna

duckgirl Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 4:33pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RylanTy

Hi duckgirl, FBCT stands for Frozen Buttercream Transfer. She got it partially right =]. Gumpaste can be made using different recipes. There are also mixes to make it as well as ready made ones. You can also turn your fondant into gumpaste by adding tylose powder. It can be formed freehand or with different tools.

Here is a link to decode acronyms: http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-2926-.html

Good luck and I hope she enjoys her birthday.




Thank you so much for the info and that link! I appreciate it! icon_biggrin.gif

terrylee Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 4:39pm
post #13 of 17

Welcome to CC Goldenleo and duckgirl......As you see, advice is always here for you.....this is why this site is so popular and addicting. Everyone is always willing to help out with hints, ideas, advise and even constructive critisim when asked.....YOU WILL LOVE THIS SITE......BE PREPARED TO BE AN ADDICT.

duckgirl Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 4:56am
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by terrylee

Welcome to CC Goldenleo and duckgirl......As you see, advice is always here for you.....this is why this site is so popular and addicting. Everyone is always willing to help out with hints, ideas, advise and even constructive critisim when asked.....YOU WILL LOVE THIS SITE......BE PREPARED TO BE AN ADDICT.




Thank you for the welcome! I have a quick question. When freezing my cake layers prior to frosting them, do they remain in the pan in which they were baked, or on a plate? Just don't want to have them end up stuck in the pan, lol!

Rylan Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 12:46pm
post #15 of 17

After baking my cakes, I let it cool completely. I then wrap it in layers of plastic wrap, then put it in a ziploc bag and foil the bigger ones. I make sure everything is sealed up before putting then in the freezer. I personally wouldn't freeze it from the pan.

duckgirl Posted 5 Jun 2009 , 2:44pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RylanTy

After baking my cakes, I let it cool completely. I then wrap it in layers of plastic wrap, then put it in a ziploc bag and foil the bigger ones. I make sure everything is sealed up before putting then in the freezer. I personally wouldn't freeze it from the pan.




I actually had thought about putting them in ziplocs, but then I was concerned they'd get stuck in there and tear the cake. Since nobody was around in the wee hours last night to answer, I had to make the call myself, and just left them in their pans and put foil over them, and into the freezer.

Next question, lol. How does one level the cake? What would I use that wouldn't make the cake uneven or tear them, from slicing off the tops?

GoldenLeo Posted 22 Jun 2009 , 8:45pm
post #17 of 17

I made it!!!!!!!!!
It turned out wonderful! I was afraid since I have never worked or saw fondant but it was amazing!!!
It was really easy to work with and it didn't cracked, didn't have air bubbles...
On photo I realized that I moved it a bit when I was putting it on plate....

I hope you like it, it is simple but it is a start!!!
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